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I'm going to St. Petersburg and Moscow in a month and I'm really scared about what I'm going to eat.

I've already decided to take my own stash of pb, dried fruit, soup mixes, nuts and cliff bars, but even cliff bars lose their appeal after a couple of days.

I've looked up the vegan friendly restaurants in these two cities and there appears to be a dearth of them.

What I'd like are some suggestions of Russian dishes I can choose in regular restaurants that are vegan.

No, I don't speak Russian. Communications will be difficult, I know.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I don't know much about Russia, sorry. But I used google and came up with this.

Russian (phonetic)

-Yah nye yem meeyasa. (I don't eat meat)

-Yah nye yem rihbu. (I don't eat fish)

-Yah nye pyooh mahlahko eeee yah nye yem sihr. (I don't drink milk and I don't eat cheese)

-Yah lyublyu gihvahtnihh poehtahmuh yah nye yem eeh (I love animals, so I don't eat them)

Uhm... Yeah. And I saw a thread a little while ago with some other translation sites on it. I can't seem to find it. Good luck, and have fun on your trip!
 

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I found more!

Russian (phonetic)

-Ya ve-ge-ta-ri-aa-nyets/ve-ge-ta-ri-aanka - I am vegetarian (male/female)

-Ya bi kho-tyel/kho-tye-la chto nibud' byez myasa, ribi ili pti-tsi. - I would like something without meat, fish or poultry.

-Yah nye yem meeyasa. - I don't eat meat

-Ya ni lyublyoo myaso - I don't like meat

-Yah nye yem rihbu. - I don't eat fish

-Ya nye yem ni myasa, ni ribi, ni pti-tsi. - I don't eat meat, fish, poultry,

-Yetot sup na myas-nom bul'onye? - Is there meat broth in this soup?

-Ya mogu yest' sir i yaitsa i pit' moloko. - I can eat cheese and eggs and drink milk.

-Ya nye yem sir i yaitsa i nye p'yu mo-lo-ko. - I can not eat cheese and eggs and drink milk.

-Yah nye pyooh mahlahko eeee yah nye yem sihr. - I don't drink milk and I don't eat cheese

-Kofye bez mo-lo-ka, po-zha-lui-sta. - Coffee without milk, please.

-Yah lyublyu gihvahtnihh poehtahmuh yah nye yem eeh - I love animals, so I don't eat them

I still can't find that other thread, and it's bothering me. Anyways, good luck again, hope this helps a bit.
 

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The sad part is even a fluent russian speaker will have a hard time getting a vegan meal in the Moscow but its not impossible.

When I was there a few years ago I did just as you are doing: brought a lot of my own food. What is nice is the local bakeries make the most amazing breads so you won't have a problem there. Also, check out the little old ladies selling pickles and home grown vegetables by Metro stations. The best pickles I've ever had came from them. And there are 'western' supermarkets that are quite expensive but cater to ex-pats and will have a lot of food to eat, including nuts and crackers and potato chips and the like. The trick is to keep some food in your bag you carry with you and snack all day.

For restaurants the old tricks apply. Italian restaurants or pizza places will give you a veg pizza without cheese. learn how to say 'without cheese' in Russian - get yourself a phrase book/russian-english dictionary and point to the words if need be. Also, there are a number of Indian restaurants that will be able to serve you a vegan meal if you can explain it to them effectively. And don't forget about Lebanese/Middle Eastern restaurants for falafel hummous and the like.

And according to Uncle Pasha, there are a few vegetarian restaurants in Moscow as well as a number of vegetarian friendly places. http://www.unclepasha.com/veg/vegeta...estaurants.htm

And as St Petersburg is more studenty than Moscow you'll fare even better there. Look, a number of veggie places: http://www.vegetarian-restaurants.net/Europe/Russia.htm That Troitski Bridge looks great!

Get your phrase book and russian/english dictionary NOW and start studying. Be sure to get a dictionary that has lots of food items so you can use it to read menus. And don't forget the most important Russian phrase to say 'Spasibo' (pronounced 'spa see bo') which is Russian for 'thank you'.
 
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