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So how can I get the protein I need by being vegetarian? I did the whole vegetarian thing for 8 months, and I was sick the entire time.. It was awful! I finally figured out that it was the soy. Any help would be appreciated!!!
 

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A lot of vegetarians are able to stay vegetarian if they are allergic to soy.<br><br><br><br>
The first thing to keep in mind is that fake meats aren't a necessity.<br><br><br><br>
The second thing to keep in mind is that soy milk isn't the only non-dairy milk available on the market. There is also rice milk and almond milk.<br><br><br><br>
For protein, you should be fine. Beans, lentils, nuts, whole grains, and several vegetables have plenty of protein. If you're not vegan, then there is also dairy products and/or eggs.<br><br><br><br>
You'll need to get in the habit of reading labels on everything and cooking more from scratch. Soy crops up where you least expect it. Vegetable oil, for example, often times is soybean oil. Convenience foods will also often have soy protein in them, too.<br><br><br><br>
It's definitely doable. It will take some getting used to, but you can do it.
 

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Try rice or oat milks?<br><br><br><br>
As far as meat analogues go, most do contain soya, but some are made from wheat, like seitan and may be worth trying.<br><br><br><br>
Protein is difficult to be deficient in, you can get it from nuts, seeds, grains, quinoa, lentils, beans and other legumes.<br><br>
If you are just lacto-ovo and not vegan then eggs and dairy too.
 

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Yep you have some great advice here, besides which protein while important is highly over important-asized (yes, I like making up my own words <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> ). I too can't tolerate soy except in itty bitty amounts (like a teaspoon of soy sauce spread over an entire dinner won't hurt much but anything more and I'm in agony). I used seitan a bit the first couple of weeks of moving across but now I'm not keen on it's meaty texture but you can use it in place of tofu in many recipes. I don't mind it stir fried but that's about it. As for milks, I'm cooking with rice milk and drinking almond milk and using almond on my brekkie when I have it which I make myself cause i like it really thick and milky. It also makes a great chockie milk.<br><br><br><br>
Lentils are awesome and I cook them in so many ways and quinoa is a wonderful source of protein too and is yummy and versatile. I had the exact same questions as you before but there are alternatives, they're just generally not ready made like a lot of soy subs are.<br><br><br><br>
I have a few recipes for non soy sour cream subs and stuff you can get off the net too!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>tearhsong2</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Beans, lentils, nuts, whole grains, and several vegetables have plenty of protein.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Whole grains are definitely under-emphasized as a source of protein. The label on my pita bread says that there are 8 grams per pita! That's pretty good. Same with some of my cereals.
 

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You don't need soy to be vegetarian <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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