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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
if i drink the water left , will i get any or all of the vitamins that may have leeked out , if this is yes does it matter how long i cook them for , ???/?//
 

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This question made me laugh.<br><br><br><br>
If you're worried about your veggies losing their nutrients in water you could just steam them.
 

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Yuck <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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Steaming veggies you lose very little nutrients to the water. if you boil them its much worse. use very little water, and you will be fine (just do not burn your pot, lol.)
 

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veggielove "Steaming veggies you lose very little nutrients to the water. if you boil them its much worse. use very little water, and you will be fine"<br><br><br><br>
Not so. You lose almost as much nutrients from steaming, assuming you do it for the same amount of time, as you do from boiling. There is a difference, but it is not such a big differenc, and you lose lots of nutrients to the water, either way . The amount of time you cook, has a greater affect than whether the vegetable is surrounded by boiling water, or surrounded by steam. The advantage of steaming is there is less water used to cook the same amount of vegetables, much much less, so even tho the amount of nutrients lost from the vegetables is only slightly less, because there is less water, the percentage of nutrients in the water is much much higher, than in water used for boiling, it is much more concentrated, and you can use that water in recipes, soups and stews. The amount of water left over from boiling -- you won't find a use for it. It is just too much, and the nutrients in it are too dilute to make using it worthwhile. You'd have to take in way too much water into your body, to get a small amount of nutrients.<br><br><br><br>
I think that some micronutrients go into the water in larger amounts than other micronutrients. But it is about the same for each whether you boil or steam. Just slightly less for steaming.<br><br><br><br>
One reason people do better on raw diets - they are comparing their raw diet to a cooked diet where they throw away the water, instead of eating it, rather than to a cook diet where the water is eaten.<br><br><br><br>
There are some exceptions: you don't want to use the water that you steamed or boiled artichokes in. You don't want to use the water that acorns have been boiled in. By the way, the fact that the water becomes unpalatable but the artichokes become palatable, supports my hypothesis that more of some micronutrients go into the water than stay in the solid veg. It seems obvious that more of the thing in artichokes that taste bad, ends up in the water, than in the artichoke. It is tannic acid, by the way, that has the bad taste.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>laurie15</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I use that for veggie stock.</div>
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I was just going to suggest that. I've done it myself. Most of the time I steam however, and don't save the water.
 

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Add me to the "blech" category.<br><br><br><br>
sm...where did you find this information? Everything I've seen, from the USDA, etc. suggests steaming is better. Also, I find that steaming actually does take less time than boiling, for hard vegetables at least.
 

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Steaming is definitly better. But the main reason it is better is that it produces only a small amount of water, in which there are very concentrated nutrients -- an amount of water that is easy to put in food or drink. Trying to drink all the water that you boiled something in, in order to get all the nutrients that are in it, is impractical. Too much water.
 

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"What about sticking the veggies in a foil pouch and shoving them into the oven?"<br><br><br><br>
Well, I think this is a good idea, but it has its disadvantages. Some of the water may leave the veggies, stick to the foil, and completely evaporate, leaving a thin film of dry nutrient "paint" or "varnish" adhering to the foil.<br><br><br><br>
Since this is usually done with aluminum foil, soaking the foil in water to reclaim the varnish is probably a really bad idea, as you will have aluminum compounds forming between the varnish and the nutrients, and aluminum is thought to cause alzheimers, and you will probably be able to taste it, as well. That said, if you avoid cutting the veggies into many small pieces, probably less water will leave them, than if you had steamed veggie pieces; more of the water, with its dissolved nutrients, will stay within the pieces of vegetable. However I don't like aluminum in contact with my food. While the risk of alzheimers is not proven, I think the chances are too high that aluminum in one's food is not a good idea, and that al coolware and foil, should generally be avoided.<br><br><br><br>
Also, simply placing food on top of a layer of foil, would have less foil-to food contact, than completely wrapping it. Completely wrapping the food in foil would allow moisture to contact the foil, react with it, dissolve some of the aluminum into it, then drip back onto the food pieces. I don't think the amount is as much as cooking in an aluminum pot. Personally, I do this occasionally -- wrap a 1/2 squash or something in foil -- to bake it without charring it. But I feel a bit worried about getting aluminum into my body that way. I only do it occasionally. I could be wrong. But I feel safer steaming my vegetables in stainless steel cookware than oven-steaming it, wrapped in foil, even tho I do think there is less nutrient loss from the veg pieces, using the oven-foil method. I just <b>use</b> all the water that I've steamed things in. Consume it, one way or another. For example the other day I steamed brussels sprouts. Then I mixed some olive oil, garlic, salt, Tobasco sauce, into the few tablespoons of water that I had left after I was done steaming (if nece adjust the amt of water down by boiling it a few minutes longer), heated this just to boiling, then let it cool for a minute, and added a tiny amount of sesame tahini. I had a very nice sauce to pour over my brussel sprouts. I cut the sprouts in half and let them soak up the sauce.
 

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I usually just line the bottom of the pan with like, 1.5 inches of water and then put a lid on top with a little crack. This way, you only get like, 1/2 a cup of water (it would take way more to boil) and its easier to drink. I sometimes would drink it down. Was it nasty? Yes. But I felt an inner sense of hope, thinking that maybe I was getting extra nutrients.
 

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I steam pretty much the same way mslinzyann. Stuties show it makes little difference if you raise the veggies above the steaming water, or simply put them right in the steaming water. Either way, the steaming water takes out about the same amt of matter from the vegetables.<br><br><br><br>
I find my steaming water generally tastes good. If it tastes bad, I don't use it. The water from artichokes tastes awful. It is full of tannic acid. It should be discarded. The water from red beans tastes awful. Same reason. Actually, that is why I use only white beans, and not red black or brown beans -- tannic acid makes red bean water unpalatable, and irritating to stomach. Water that white beans are cooked in is delicious.<br><br><br><br>
My rule of thumb is if the water doesn't taste awful, I must consume it. All cruciferous vegetables, the water is delicious. Asparagus: good. Potatoes: delicious. Celery: good. Carrots: good. Peas: good. Tan chik peas: good. Green and yellow peas (split peas) - you may want to cook em long enough so that there is no distinction between the cooking water and the veggie -- you just have a gruel, paste, or soup.
 

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If you're worried about losing water-soluble nutrients, why not try a dry cooking method like roasting or sauteing? It makes lots of vegetables extra-yummy as well as preventing nutrient loss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
whats sauteing (sorry not up with cooking)<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>specialK12</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
whats sauteing (sorry not up with cooking)<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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Sauté = cooking in a frying pan.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>jeezycreezy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Sauté = cooking in a frying pan.</div>
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Yeah, it's basically a fancy word for frying. Technically, saute usually suggest you're using less oil, moving the pieces of food around more, and cooking at a higher heat, but most people use the two words pretty much interchangeably.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>specialK12</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
if i drink the water left , will i get any or all of the vitamins that may have leeked out , if this is yes does it matter how long i cook them for , ???/?//</div>
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As Soilman said, it doesn't matter whether you steam or cook, the heat destroys the vitamins to a certain extent (which might even be 100%). But electrolytes like potassion, manganese, calcium and so on leek out and they might be saved with the cooking water.<br><br>
If I cook I try to steam for only a short time.
 
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