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I just don't know how. It seems every time I want to try, someone wants to sabotage me.<br><br><br><br>
The other problem I have is I don't know HOW to eat right. Every book contradicts the other. "Only eat peas" "peas are bad for you" (Okay, that is extreme, but you know what I mean.)<br><br><br><br>
I need help with all this and I just need some support.....<br><br><br><br>
Sorry if this sounds whiny....<br><br><br><br>
Anni
 

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Annikat, read "Becoming Vegan" or "Becoming Vegetarian." They are wonderful primers on nutrition. They are not "diet" books but they will teach you the basics and get you on the right track.
 

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AnniKat,<br><br><br><br>
You've brought up a complicated subject. Sometimes it's easy to be confused about the myths we hear about foods. You should try to get 'back to basics' when it comes to foods. Don't think of foods in terms of 'good' or 'bad'. People will say peas are bad, bananas will make you fat, etc. Ignore that. Ignore the fads - they just don't work. You need to burn off more calories than you are eating in order to lose weight. Eat smaller portions (using smaller plates helps!) and exercise more (just walking is fine - do whatever you are capable of doing).<br><br><br><br>
Focus on a whole foods approach to eating. Eat whole grains, fruits and vegetables, legumes, etc that are minimally processed (if at all - frozen foods are ok as long as they aren't highly processed: for example, frozen corn is just as nutritious as fresh corn). Check out <a href="http://www.mypyramid.gov/" target="_blank">MyPyramid</a> to find out how much and what kinds of foods you should be eating. In general, there are very few plant based foods that you need to worry about limiting. Avocadoes and nuts are higher in fat and should be used sparingly if you are trying to lose weight. Don't add a lot of cooking oil when preparing foods. Watch simple sugars (soda, baked goods, etc). Don't deny yourself the less nutritious foods you enjoy, just eat them less often. (A good rule of thumb is to limit the 'extra' calories to 150 calories a day).<br><br><br><br>
Depending on your circumstances, a visit with a registered dietitian may be covered by your health care system or insurance. If you are overweight, your doctor can provide you with a referral. They can help you set goals for yourself that are realistic and feasible. Don't try to do everything at once. Make small changes. Don't think of it as a 'diet', but as a lifestyle change. A diet usually ends once the weight is lost, and the person goes back to their old habits and puts the weight back on. You have to be willing to make these changes for life. But you don't have to deprive yourself. Many people, including myself, are at a very healthy weight and enjoy foods such as cupcakes, pies, cookies, and chocolates on a regular basis.<br><br><br><br>
I've given you some really basic advice. I guess my number one piece of advice here for you is if you have access to a dietitian, take advantage of the opportunity. A good dietitian can guide you on your quest to healthier eating. (And yes, I am biased <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"> )
 

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I agree with meatless's book recommendations. Keep in mind that "diet" books aren't the best places to get a basic knowledge of nutrition, as they make their money by claiming to have a "new", "different", "amazing" method for weight loss, which they can't sell if they are just reminding readers of common sense and basic nutrition concepts.<br><br><br><br>
There's a lot less "disagreement" among nutritionists than there is among diet authors!<br><br><br><br>
Here are some basic points that are widely accepted as pertinent to healthy eating:<br><br><br><br>
1. Less than 30% of your calories should come from fat, and 10%-15% should come from protein; carbohydrates constitute the remainder.<br><br><br><br>
2. For fats, use "good fats" like olive oil, nuts, and avocados. Avoid saturated fats (solid at room temperature), and especially trans fats.<br><br><br><br>
3. For carbs, whole grains (brown rice, whole wheat breads, corn flour, millet, quinoa, etc.) are better than processed grains (white rice, white bread).<br><br><br><br>
4. Cooking from scratch is better than buying processed foods. This automatically helps with #2 and #3!<br><br><br><br>
5. Fiber is good. Whole grains and vegetables help here.<br><br><br><br>
6. Be moderate in your consumption of processed sugar, salt, and alcohol.<br><br><br><br>
Vegetarians have a built-in advantage right down this list!<br><br><br><br>
Regarding weight loss, there is one and only one basic concept:<br><br><br><br><b><i>To lose weight, you must burn more calories through exercise than you consume by eating.</i></b><br><br><br><br>
Diets succeed or fail depending on whether they can get this to happen. Since people differ in biochemistry, psychology, and social environment, different diets are more effective for different people.<br><br><br><br>
For example, I lose weight if I reduce my fat intake. (A gram of fat has more than twice the calories of a gram of carbs, so fatty food is more calorie-rich than an equal amount of low-fat food.) For others, foods with high glycemic index are the problem - they mess with your insulin levels and encourage over-eating.<br><br><br><br>
Psychologically, it's easier for some people to eliminate certain categories of foods, while for others, reducing portion size is more effective. Few people have the diligence to count calories (or carbs, or grams of fat, or whatever). Also, few people can stick with a diet that denies them familiar comfort foods.<br><br><br><br>
Some folks like the guidance of following a diet with definite rules and meal plans; others like a more do-it-yourself approach.<br><br><br><br>
However you approach it, keep in mind that any change in eating habits takes a few weeks to get used to. Be patient. Also, don't try to lose too fast. Most nutritionists say 1-2 lbs per week is a healthy rate.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck!
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/broccoli.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":bobo:"> Yes, Fyvel and I are part of a conspiracy.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Seusomon</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/broccoli.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":bobo:"> Yes, Fyvel and I are part of a conspiracy.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/deal2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":deal:"><br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lipsrsealed2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":sealed:"> Don't tell anyone!
 

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great posts fyvel and seusomon!<br><br><br><br>
I probably sound like a broken record, but I think the key to long-term, healthy weight loss is to focus on being healthy, and nourishing your body. A diet that's low on calories AND nutrients might help you lose weight initially, but it's not a lifestyle that can be sustained.<br><br><br><br>
I hate "diets."
 

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I've said this to others, and I'll say it again--the only way you'll maintain a healthy weight for the rest of your life (no yo-yo-ing) is to change your mindset from "I want to lose weight" to "I want to be healthy." Don't read any diet books or "go on a diet." Try to do the following:<br><br><br><br>
1. Exercise regularly. Find activities that you like to do and make them part of your routine, like brushing your teeth or taking a shower.<br><br>
2. Eat mostly whole foods. That means a diet rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, etc. If you're ovo-lacto, keep eggs and dairy to a minimum. If you don't cook much, find some recipes in books or online that sound appealing to you and start to cook more. The more you cook healthful dishes that you like, the less you'll be tempted by junk food.<br><br>
3. Portion control. Start to pay more attention to your body and when it's full. Try to eat smaller portions and snacks throughout the day rather than eating until you're "stuffed."<br><br><br><br>
That is the eggplant "diet" plan that has worked for me for four years now. Don't worry so much about each new news item you hear about what's good and what's bad for you. Eat a wide variety of whole foods in moderation and it'll all be good for you...
 

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"To lose weight, you must burn more calories through exercise than you consume by eating."<br><br><br><br>
That's not true!<br><br><br><br>
The human body burns calories all on its own, just to keep the heart pumping, the organs working, the muscles maintaining themselves..even food takes calories to digest. This is called Basal Metabolic Rate (aka BMR).<br><br><br><br>
I think what you meant to say is that to lose weight, you must burn more calories OVERALL (exercise + lifestyle + BMR) than you consume.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>bluewisdom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
"To lose weight, you must burn more calories through exercise than you consume by eating."<br><br><br><br>
That's not true!<br><br><br><br>
The human body burns calories all on its own, just to keep the heart pumping, the organs working, the muscles maintaining themselves..even food takes calories to digest. This is called Basal Metabolic Rate (aka BMR).<br><br><br><br>
I think what you meant to say is that to lose weight, you must burn more calories OVERALL (exercise + lifestyle + BMR) than you consume.</div>
</div>
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Yes, that is correct. I was lumping the basal energy expenditure into that statement. For people with a problem losing weight, exercise is generally the way to burn more calories than you eat, and is more desirable than restricting foods (unless there is a contraindication to exercise).
 

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Hi Annikat,<br><br>
I'm going through the same thing right now. I have gained and lost, lost and gained.<br><br><br><br>
What I have learned is this cardinal rule, which is almost confusing-you need to burn more calories then you consume.<br><br><br><br>
How do you do this? Right, how do you? What I'm doing-and it's working! I'm consiously counting calories, keeping what I eat down to a mild roar. I eat a lot of vegetables, whole grains, no soda. I drink a lot of water, lots of fiber to feel more full. And if I want to eat, and I know I'd be eating too much, I chew some gum, and I'm not craving anymore. I generally consume about 1600-1700 calories a day, and I can just about fit into a smaller pair of pants now!<br><br><br><br>
I don't fry stuff, I keep the oil to a minimum. I do use Splenda in my tea with real lemon.<br><br><br><br>
If you need support, we're all here.
 

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You say that people try to sabotage you. Yes, they'll do that, intentionally or not, but ultimately YOU decide what goes into your mouth. I had a hard time losing weight until I acknowledged that since I already had the knowledge, my problem was with staying the course and not getting discouraged if results are slow. I only lost 2-3 lb a month. But the months have been flying by! I examined my competing priorities ie partying with my friends and trying trendy new restaurants vs exercising and eating healthy. I simply moved healthy eating and exercise higher up the list and reminded myself I was looking at a lifestyle change and not a "diet." Are you ready to change your lifestyle to succeed?
 

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Track your calories and your activity. I use fitday.com, and it works well for me. Others like <a href="http://www.calorie-count.com" target="_blank">www.calorie-count.com</a>.<br><br><br><br>
I eat 3 meals and 2-3 snacks every day, choosing foods that are filling but low in calories - like a salad with a lot of beans. Or a veggie wrap at subway. Or veg stew. Or pita pizza. Or a lentil dish. Rice and pasta are okay, but in small portions only. They're so high in calories and aren't as filling as other foods. In other words, I pick foods that give me more bang for my caloric buck, so to speak.<br><br><br><br>
I'd rather eat a slice of high-fiber, high-protein bread with a tablespoon of peanut butter on it (about 200 calories) than a cup of calrose white rice (about 240 calories). The former keeps me fuller, longer. And is better for me.<br><br><br><br>
I don't pay attention to fat content - just calories - and it works for me. If something's high in fat, it's going to be high in calories as well. But something low in fat can be high in calories.<br><br><br><br>
I exercise 3-4 times a week, for 45-60 minutes at a time. I run and lift weights. I listen to music when I do so and use that time to reflect on work and figure out how to resolve some of the issues i'm facing.
 

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for weightloss if u do 8mins of vigorous exercise at top speed like to your fullest capacity constantly for 8 mins so nething like skipping really fast or cycling or running or swimming, then u lose mor weight than doing an hour of solid exercise a day but having said that doing an hour a day is a lot more beneficial for your health in the long term
 

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Besides, building some lean muscle mass will help you to burn more calories than just doing some cardio. An extra 10 pounds of lean muscle will burn approximately 3500 kcal (equivalent to a pound of fat) every week.
 

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I know I sound like a broken record, but, as long as you are making healthy food choices, then all you need to do is EAT less and Exercise MORE. I have low blood pressure and at times I find myself with little or no energy, all it takes is for me to kick myself in the ass, get off the couch have a healthy snack and go outside and start doing something, anything and before I know it my blood pressure is up and I feel full of energy and those few pesky ass pounds start to melt away. But if I start to feel sorry for myself, munch a little too much,and laze around, those pesky ass pounds will come right back. So eat smart and exercise smartly. But most of all BE HAPPY.
 

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ok well thast what i heard but i wasnt comparing liek an hour of vigorous activity to 8 mins of vigorous activity of course the hour will burn more i meant liek an hour of walking to 8mins top speed on an xercise bike but if its not true then ok lol i havent tried it its just what i was told.
 

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If I run for 8 minutes as hard as I can (about 7 mph), I'll burn maybe 100 calories. Maybe. That is, if I don't pass out first. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"><br><br><br><br>
If I run for an hour at my normal distance pace (about 5.5 mph), I'll burn about 550-600 calories.<br><br><br><br>
This goes for about anything, unless you're comparing vigorous running for 8 minutes (and why 8 minutes) with, say, gardening. Then maybe you're right.<br><br><br><br>
But in general, you were misinformed, sorry.<br><br><br><br>
Anyway, I fear we've strayed OT.
 
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