VeggieBoards banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been going strong for about 4 weeks and am super proud of myself! But lately my hands have become extremely dry and my lips are starting to peel and crack -- both my hands and lips are starting to hurt from being so dry. My hands have always gotten dry in the past, but never this bad. I did some Google searches and most everything points to me needing more fat which I just realized is currently almost non-existent. The USDA recommends 30-35% of your calories come from fat, that currently sounds impossible to me!

Up until 3 weeks ago I was eating cheese which made it really easy to get fats, but I stopped eating dairy once I finished whatever I had left in my fridge. Every morning I blend half a tablespoon of flax seed and mix it in with my oatmeal but I still need more fat. I know I can supplement and I just finished buying fish oil since I'm already eating flax seed, but I would really like to learn how to incorporate more fats into my diet without supplementing or depending on any animal based product. Besides raw nuts and avocados, are their any fruits/veggies that I should start eating? I am avoiding all processed foods and am trying to keep my diet at least 50% raw.

Part of the frustration is that if you search for "fat vegan recipes" all you get is fat free vegan recipes or websites about fat vegans. If anyone has any recipes that are fatty, vegan and natural I would really really really appreciate it!

Thanks for all your help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,693 Posts
Any coconut milk based curry using full fat coconut milk will be relatively high in fat, especially if the recipe includes nuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts
Add seed and nuts to your oatmeal. Have nut spreads on toast for snacks. Add avocadoes and olives to salads. Make salad dressings with EVO and other healthy oils. Drizzle oil onto your steamed vegetables and grains. Make bean dips with nut butter and/or with oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
seconding (thirding?) the above responses, but also wanted to add - you can pick up a tin of Bag Balm (it's in a squarish green container) and a pair of cotton gloves or an old pair of socks... gloop the Bag Balm over your hands really good and put on the gloves/socks (it'll be messy either way but less so with the covering), and leave them on overnight if possible. my hands and lower lip crack and bleed from being dry in the winter, and it's one of the only things that help them.

vitamin E tabs might help too, just poke a hole in them and smear it on your hands and lips... that way you had a little bit of help in the meantime while you're upping your fat intake?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks nomad and shyvas! coconut milk and EVO sounds like some great ideas! I was adding tomatoes, olives, cucumbers, etc to keep my salads moist but I should start adding dressing, it sounds like an easy place to add fat. I am already adding hemp granola to my oatmeal to help get some more fat but I think I might need to start adding a small portion as a side to every meal.

Rachel I'll have to try that out, I've been putting lotion on my hands every morning/night and there are super soft and yet peeling... totally bizarre IMO!
 

·
Not such a Beginner ;)
Joined
·
8,394 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

Add seed and nuts to your oatmeal. Have nut spreads on toast for snacks. Add avocadoes and olives to salads. Make salad dressings with EVO and other healthy oils. Drizzle oil onto your steamed vegetables and grains. Make bean dips with nut butter and/or with oil.
I want you to cook for me! I always get hungry when reading your food talk!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,245 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggle View Post

The USDA recommends 30-35% of your calories come from fat, that currently sounds impossible to me!
It's too high, and the reason it is set at those values is completely political.

I find that when my lips start to chap it is a sign of dehydration. Try drinking more water. Your need for water may be higher than other peoples', if you think you are already drinking enough.
 

·
Arrrg! Me mateys.
Joined
·
5,591 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by a Balloon a Balloon View Post

Peeeeaaannnuuutttttt buttttteeeeerrrrr!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Echo that! I once ate a whole jar in one day. No regrets, but the next day I realized I couldn't make the peanut noodles or vegan reeces I wanted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

It's too high, and the reason it is set at those values is completely political.

I find that when my lips start to chap it is a sign of dehydration. Try drinking more water. Your need for water may be higher than other peoples', if you think you are already drinking enough.
I drink a lot of water every day so I don't think it's dehydration. Is there a general consensus on the recommended fat and protein consumption for vegetarians/vegans? What's your goal?

Ballon, after graduating from college, I thought PB&J's were gonna be part of my past, I may need to reconsider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,456 Posts
Coconut oil is a good fat too. You can cook with it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,245 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggle View Post

I drink a lot of water every day so I don't think it's dehydration. Is there a general consensus on the recommended fat and protein consumption for vegetarians/vegans? What's your goal?
No there isn't really a consensus amongst vegetarians and vegans. There is a pro-fat crowd and a pro-carbohydrate crowd. There are studies that show that people can thrive on diets in which about 5 to 6% of their calories come from fats and 5 to 6% of their calories come from protein, but experts feel this won't be accepted by most people, so they recommend 10% of total calories from fat and 10% of total calories from protein, given that you are consuming enough total calories a day to maintain your weight and energy requirements.

The reason the government recommends 30% and over is because in order to reduce total fat intake to optimal levels, people would have to cut out animal products. The meat and dairy lobbies put pressure on them to raise the percentage.

My own goal is to shoot for 10% of my calories from fat. There are people who feel you won't be harmed by eating more, but as someone who lost 120 pounds and reversed my diabetes without medication by reducing total fat to 10% or less of my total caloric intake, it is my opinion that you will not be harmed by eating less than 30% of your calories from fat.

Another one of my goals is to drink two quarts of water first thing in the morning, before I eat anything, and a couple more quarts throughout the day. That's why I wonder if you might need more water than you think.

Oh and your carbohydrates should come from whole foods, not processed sugars. I think it is a shame that most of the time when people refer to "carbs" as the real reason for poor health, they are referring to processed junk foods, not whole grains and fruits.
 

·
Ankle Biter
Joined
·
9,333 Posts
I'll share my tummy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
922 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by LedBoots View Post

I want you to cook for me! I always get hungry when reading your food talk!
I have always wanted to be a personal chef ( just like Sting's who only works a few hours a day for $$$$) and being able to use my creativity.


My rates are very competative and my only quirk would be ; no screaming boss
 

·
Not such a Beginner ;)
Joined
·
8,394 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shyvas View Post

I have always wanted to be a personal chef ( just like Sting's who only works a few hours a day for $$$$) and being able to use my creativity.


My rates are very competative and my only quirk would be ; no screaming boss
I never scream when being fed yummy vegan food.


That would be a cool job, wouldn't it, cooking for a rich vegan?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,693 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggle View Post

Is there a general consensus on the recommended fat and protein consumption for vegetarians/vegans?
Consensus is not a word you're likely to see in nutrition science for another 200 years or so. Most of the theories people toss around, both widely accepted and trendy, are fairly new and extremely difficult to test in a manner that would be considered good science.

The longest average lifespan in the world for men goes to Iceland, where they traditionally have a fairly high fat diet consisting of fish, sheep, and dairy. Okinawa pumps out centenarians (people who live past 100) like crazy with a diet relatively low in fat, and traditionally high in rice and fish with moderate amounts of tofu. The 7th Adventists have a lot of vegetarians in their ranks who also eat a generally low fat diet and tend to have lifespans significantly longer than average.

The only connection I see when I analyze all the various diets in the world, various centenarian studies, etc., and the overall affect diet does or does not have on health, is sheer volume. Those who get all the crucial nutrients but otherwise consume just enough to get by tend to live longer. Those who fill themselves to the brim at every meal tend to die younger regardless of what it is they're stuffing themselves with.

I personally tend to get 3,000 calories per day minimum with 40% to 50% of my calories from fat (and that's after cutting down recently), and this goes up to as much as 4,000 calories per day with an even higher percentage of fat during periods of increased activity. Statistically speaking, I am not likely to break any records with my lifespan. But I'm an extremely active person, and I find that when I cut back I crash, and I can't accept that. Nonetheless, I have never had any problems with weight, and I've never had so much as a "you might want to keep an eye on that" from a blood test. As far as any tests can tell, my health (aside from a minor injury received during my last deployment) is flawless.

Amidst all the conflicting information out there, I am a firm believer in two concepts regarding nutrition:
1: Humans are extremely adaptable. There is no single healthiest diet. We can thrive under a wide variety of circumstances.
2: Everyone is different, some very different. My metabolism is through the roof, and I do very well on a high fat, moderate protein, moderate carbohydrate diet. Apparently, this is not the case for everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

The reason the government recommends 30% and over is because in order to reduce total fat intake to optimal levels, people would have to cut out animal products. The meat and dairy lobbies put pressure on them to raise the percentage.
What about potato chips and french fries? What about salad dressing? If you eat whole foods and consume 3 servings of animal products each day, it is actually difficult get reach 30% of calories from fat. I crunched some numbers in Cronometer and got 70/15/16 ratio of carb/fat/protein from a diet that included 3 servings of 90/10 ground beef and the rest brown rice and boiled vegetables. Most added fats are not animal fats, but fats in dressings, cooking oils, etc. Most of the fat clogging people's arteries are the "heart healthy" vegetable oils: corn, soybean, canola (rapeseed), etc.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top