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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been enjoying experimenting with tofu lately. Unfortunately it seems that I am slightly sensitive/allergic to it (???) It is strange as I drink soy milk and eat soy yogurts - never had an issue. What happens is that as soon as I eat it my tummy bloats up and I have gastric juice noise/cramps. I tried eliminating it for a few days and for sure that is what was causing it. I am a little disappointed because I like it WAY better than Tempeh (haven't tried Seitan yet).<br><br>
I have only tried one type of tofu, from one brand. Do you guys think it is worth me trying some different ones?
 

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Maybe it's the fermentation that you are intolerant to. I doubt it would be the soy itself.<br><br>
You could try another brand and see. I can't cause any harm to try.
 

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Soy is the 4th most common allergy in the world, it sucks but it is actually pretty normal to not be able to digest soy comfortably. I am in the same boat as you except im not too fond of tofu to begin with.<br><br>
maybe trying other brands might help a little, or try taking some digestive enzymes to help you digest it better (natural digestive enzymes are in pineapples and papaya).<br><br>
Do you rely on tofu much as a staple in your diet? I figured out early on in being vegan that I cant eat tofu and most soy products, so I did not rely too much on it, however I know many vegans eat a lot of tofu.
 

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If you think your allergic you should go to the doctor <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
If you are allergic, that sucks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> I have oral allergy syndrome, which isn't a food allergy, but I do get allergic reactions to some foods including soya milk and yogurt but not icecream or tofu. I was really gutted because I miss soya yogurt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think you are right Diana, it feel like the fermentation is happening in my stomach!<br><br>
I have some mild food allergies to fruits which I cannot eat raw or my throat swells up a little or itches, nothing major. But this feels different, it's a digestive thing.<br><br>
I do like tofu a lot because it is something I am rather comfortable with. Now that I think of it I have been eating miso soup with it for years, so maybe it is this particular brand? I have to locate some different ones. I remember once I got a reaction to a soy milk too. Weird how it depends on brand etc.<br><br>
I will try the papaya what a great idea, and it is delicious!<br><br>
I would also be gutted not to be able to eat soy milk and yogurt - those are my faves!
 

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Maybe try making it yourself? I don't know, but could it be the coagulant used that isn't agreeing with you? If you could figure out which coagulant was being used and avoid that, it might help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
how can you make tofu??? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"><br><br>
I think I will start by trying different brands. This one is a Bio/Organic one - ingredients: water, soy beans, nigari
 

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As far as I know nigari is an anti-allergen, but it's not inconceivable that you could have an allergy to it.<br><br>
Tofu is easy; basically heat soy milk in a pot with a coagulant (nigari or magnesium chloride or other things, lemon apparently works for dessert tofu), then strain and pack down the solid bits in cheesecloth.
 

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I love tofu, and soy in general. It must be awful not to get to enjoy it as often as you'd like. I hope you find something that works for you (different brand, etc.).
 

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Tofu is basically soymilk that has a coagulant added-no fermentation or aging. Tempeh is fermented.<br>
So, if you can drink soymilk, I can't see why tofu should bother you unless it's the coagulant. Try a different one.<br>
BTW, I've made tofu from dry, organic beans and never again. The soymilk making was easy, the straining and pressing was not. You save more money making soymilk than tofu anyway, and the remaining ground, simmered beans(okara) are great in recipes.
 

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Since you can digest other soy products alright, it doesn't sound like an allergy. You could always see your doctor for peace of mind, especially since soy is such a huge part of the traditional veg*n diet. It could be the coagulant, as a couple people have said. Check out the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofu" target="_blank">Wikipedia link for tofu</a> and go to the section entitled "Production" -- it'll tell you about the different kinds of coagulants used in tofu production. It might also be the way you're preparing it. My boyfriend and I made a tofu-based stir-fry one time, and we undercooked it and suffered some consequential digestive problems that evening. :/ Make sure to cook it thoroughly, and yeah, I'd try some different brands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh thanx guys! I had no idea that tofu was not fermented. I have no issues with tempeh (I just like it less as it is too 'stuffy'). I got a couple new brands which I will try out.<br><br>
Is there a way to know if it is cooked well? The last time I cooked it it wasn't very long now that I think of it. I added it in the end with a stir fry.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>SwissMiss</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2826152"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
how can you make tofu??? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"><br><br>
I think I will start by trying different brands. This one is a Bio/Organic one - ingredients: water, soy beans, nigari</div>
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My friend and I made tofu a few years back. It was a lengthy process that I don't think I'd do again! <a href="http://megatarian.blogspot.com/2008/10/homemade-tofu-photo-diary.html" target="_blank">http://megatarian.blogspot.com/2008/...oto-diary.html</a><br><br>
Wildwood (?) makes a Sprouted Tofu that is supposed to be easier to digest. Sometimes tofu makes me gassy, sometimes it doesn't. Just a risk I have to take!
 

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The soymilk part of making tofu was easy without a maker.<br>
For anyone wanting to make tofu, or just soymilk, this recipe for okara was amazingly good-<br><a href="http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2006/07/okara-crab-cakes.html" target="_blank">http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2006/07...rab-cakes.html</a><br>
You can sub tofu for the okara, but I really liked the texture it gave. I thougth they were very much like reg. crab cakes, but much better. I didn't use any dulse or nori either.
 

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Yeah, tofu is raw soy and it is really hard to digest. I pretty much avoid it. It has something called phytates which block mineral absorption. It also has enzyme blockers, meaning it blocks your body producing the enzymes you need to break down protein. That is where the gas and bloating come from.<br><br><a href="http://drbenkim.com/soy-health.htm" target="_blank">http://drbenkim.com/soy-health.htm</a><br><br>
If you want to eat it now and then, take some enzyme pills with it. It should help with the gas and bloating. Tempeh is really a much healthier alternative for more regular use. To make tempeh taste better try boiling it for 10 minutes and then putting it directly in a marinade. Like BBQ sauce or whatever. Let it sit an hour. Then bake, fry or grill it. It tastes really delicious this way.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>zombiesprinkles</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2830812"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yeah, tofu is raw soy and it is really hard to digest. I pretty much avoid it. It has something called phytates which block mineral absorption. It also has enzyme blockers, meaning it blocks your body producing the enzymes you need to break down protein. That is where the gas and bloating come from.<br><br><a href="http://drbenkim.com/soy-health.htm" target="_blank">http://drbenkim.com/soy-health.htm</a><br><br>
If you want to eat it now and then, take some enzyme pills with it. It should help with the gas and bloating. Tempeh is really a much healthier alternative for more regular use. To make tempeh taste better try boiling it for 10 minutes and then putting it directly in a marinade. Like BBQ sauce or whatever. Let it sit an hour. Then bake, fry or grill it. It tastes really delicious this way.</div>
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First off, tofu is cooked. I looked at the link provided and all he really says is that fermented tofu is better, and to watch out for soy isolates. That's not tofu, or the majority of soymilks. In fact, here's where he speaks about overuse of soy products:<br><br><b>"Note from Ben Kim:</b> Eating large amounts of unfermented soy products on a regular basis is likely harmful to human health for a variety of reasons, including high phytate content and possible contamination with Aluminum.<br>
Some in the anti-soy camp point to the potential that soy has to be an "endocrine disruptor," while others in this camp believe that the phytoestrogen content of soy can increase one's risk of developing breast cancer.<br>
To the best of my knowledge, there are no definitive studies in the peer-reviewed, indexed body of literature that offer conclusive proof to back up these anti-soy claims. I find some of these claims to be in the alarmism zone - for example, to say that any food is an "endocrine disruptor" is a generalization that doesn't mean anything to me, as every food that we eat and every thought that we think technically disrupts our endocrine systems.<br>
As I mentioned in this interview with Josh Day, I feel that it is prudent to eat foods - including soy - in moderation. And I do feel that it's better for human health to eat fermented forms of soy over unfermented varieties.<br>
The bottom line for me is that I know enough healthy Korean and Chinese folks in their 80's and even their 90's who have long enjoyed den jang (miso) and tofu to believe that including some soy in one's diet is fine for most people. If you enjoy soy, my advice is to eat the best varieties available to you in moderation, and to be filled with peace and compassion as you eat it."<br><br>
Phytates are found in most all grains, beans, legumes, nuts and seeds. While they somewhat disrupt mineral absorption, they also provide anti-inflammentory properties.<br>
The most info against phytates is by the meat and dairy industries, such as Weston Price foundation.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>silva</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2830840"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
The most info against phytates is by the meat and dairy industries, such as Weston Price foundation.</div>
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Yep, and they - and others quoting them - rarely mention, if ever, what you point out about phytates being in all kinds of other foods, including ones that people consume in far larger quantities than they do soy. As far as I'm concerned, the WPF is a complete joke, and no one should take anything they say seriously. Get the facts from credible scientific organizations. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
Mmm, all this talk about tempeh. Our stores don't sell it, but picked some up in Quebec awhile ago, to try for the first time, and quite like it. I wasn't sure about it the first bite, but it grew on me by the third or fourth. It just wasn't what I was expecting at all. Wish I had some now...
 
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