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I've been a vegetarian for two years now, and ever since my grandma found out just over a year ago, she's convinced I have an eating disorder. I suppose I'd better start at the beginning; when I was an omni I was the junk food queen. I literally lived off hotdogs, microwaved mac & cheese and beef lasagne, and chocolate, so naturally I was quite chubby. However, after going veg I ditched the junk and convenience food, and switched to cooking my food from scratch, and introduced fruit and veg in my diet. I stopped snacking on chocolate and crisps late at night, and made sure my evening meal was my last meal of the day. Instantly the change was amazing. I had more energy and just felt better about myself in general, and slowly I've lost my 'chubbyness' and now I'm round about average sized, whether that's because my diet's a lot better or simply because I've finally lost my baby fat, I don't know. But my grandma seems to think that because I refuse to eat any of her processed ready meals and fast food that I'm 'damaging myself' and 'going to die'. So because I eat healthy, that means I'm going to die <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:">. And some of the things she says are so stupid too, like a few months ago we were out shopping and she stopped at McDonald's (I haven't eaten at McDonald's in years) and asked if I wanted a burger, and when I told her that I'd already told my mum I'd be cooking dinner that night, she completley flipped, lecturing me about if I didn't start eating 'properly' soon then my body would just give up on me. So basically because I don't eat McDonald's I'm going to die <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rolleyes:">. It's driving me crazy. She's even begun lecturing my mum about getting me to see a doctor because I'm getting 'thinner', but my mum just shrugs her off. My parents know that I don't have an eating disorder, they know I don't starve myself, but my grandma just can't seem to grasp that idea.<br><br><br><br>
I'm 15 years old, female, 5'1 and weigh just under 8½ stone or 105 pounds. Does that sound okay?
 

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Invite your grandma or better cook for her.
 

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Some of your friends and family members will need A LOT of time to adjust. My dad asked me "Are you still a vegetarian?" every time I saw him for about 10 years.
 

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<a href="http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Result.aspx?&dob=5/25/1991&dom=1/20/2007&age=188&ht=61&wt=105&gender=2&method=0&inchtext=0&wttext=0" target="_blank">http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Res...ext=0&wttext=0</a><br><br><br><br>
your bmi is 19.8 and your in the 44th percentile, your perfectly healthly. also try getting your grandmother some literature about why meat is bad. the only 2 i can suggest are "the china study" and "eat to live" as those are the only books ive read
 

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Sorry that you're dealing with this. My grandparents thought the same thing when I when veg. I cut out most of the crappy food also, so I lost some weight. They freaked out.<br><br><br><br>
My advice to you is to ignore it and continue to eat healthy. You're doing fine. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Someone suggested that going vegan is a 'type' of eating disorder when I first switched over from eating meat/eggs/dairy...there are some people who are not going to listen to anything you say to try and tell them otherwise. I agree with what everyone else has said. Continue to eat a healthy diet. At least your parents are on your side. As far as grandma goes, just try to keep on reassuring her and educating her on the healthy benefits of a vegetarian diet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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That happened to me when I became vegan. As a l-o vegetarian I managed to eat a lot of junk, but veganism encouraged me to start cooking more, trying more veg etc, and also cut out a lot of junk. I lost a little bit of weight, so my family decided I was anorexic.<br><br><br><br>
Once they realised I was eating three times a day + snacks they noticed I...wasn't.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineVigneault</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Some of your friends and family members will need A LOT of time to adjust. My dad asked me "Are you still a vegetarian?" every time I saw him for about 10 years.</div>
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Yes I can't wait until I get over the "it's-just-a-phase" period and they stop asking.<br><br><br><br>
I'm sry about your grandparents.. I'd say make them some tastey veg food and show them that you still do eat.
 

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My aunt thought I was anorexic back when I was an omni.<br><br>
I can only imagine what she's going to think when she finds out I'm a vegetarian...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/brood.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":brood:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>VeggiePaella</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br><br><br>
I'm 15 years old, female, 5'1 and weigh just under 8½ stone or 105 pounds. Does that sound okay?</div>
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I do not think that you are too thin at all, and it is great that you lost your chubbiness! People are just used to seeing you at a heavier weight. Keep in mind that if you carry excess fat around the waistline it is considered a health risk. In 'Eat to Live', Dr. Fuhrman suggests that on average the ideal weight for women is 95 pounds for the first 5 feet of height, and another 4 pounds for each additional inch. Its just an average that will vary by body type, but the best way to assess for each individual is to see whether or not there is excess fat around the waistline. I think it is best to be at the low end of the normal BMI, because the thinnest 10% of the population are the ones who have the greatest longevity. One thing I don't like about the BMI scales is that they are age biased. As a 48 year old adult, I'm allowed to weigh a lot more and have it still considered normal than if I was 15, and the same height. I don't like this assumption that I'm automatically expected to get fatter just because I'm getting older. It may be the reality of what tends to happen in our society, but I don't necessarily consider it 'normal'. In my case, I actually weigh less right now than I did in high school, and I'm quite pleased about that!<br><br><br><br>
BTW, Dr. Fuhrman's recommendations are a bit lower than that of many other doctors, but then again he is also trimmer and more physically fit himself than most doctors I've seen. He is a former world class athlete who was once ranked 3rd in the world in pairs ice skating. When my husband and I were watching the olympics on TV, my husband was thinking that Dr. F.'s weight recommendations wouldn't work for those olympic gymnasts and runners since they have so much muscle, and he figured they would weigh more. Much to our surprise, when they would announce the weights and heights for these athletes, they would weigh exactly what Dr. F. would have predicted as their ideal weights! They are lean and muscular, and Dr. Fuhrman's recommendations were right on target. Very impressive.<br><br><br><br>
Hope I didn't digress too much. Just though that it was something kind of interesting to share.<br><br><br><br>
Claudia
 

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Food has a lot of cultural/social associations with it such that people can take it very personally when you change your diet. Many people feed others to show love. Maybe every time your grandma saw you before, she felt reassured that you were loved. Now she feels like you are rejecting her form of love or part of her personality, and she's trying to express love by worrying about your health.<br><br><br><br>
There is not much you can do about it except reassure her you appreciate her concern and efforts or maybe try to find some dishes she can cook for you that she likes, too.<br><br><br><br>
Another aspect might be that you made a positive change. A lot of times our loved ones are scared by positive changes in our lives and try to get us to change back. It's not that they don't want you to be happy, but because it changes the dynamics and it's scary to them.
 

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Hmmm... I've been vegetarian all my life. People I know STILL ask me when I'm going to be "done" eating this way...<br><br><br><br>
Just smile, be respectful and keep on doing what you're doing...
 

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VeganClaudia said:
In 'Eat to Live', Dr. Fuhrman suggests that on average the ideal weight for women is 95 pounds for the first 5 feet of height, and another 4 pounds for each additional inch. Its just an average that will vary by body type, but the best way to assess for each individual is to see whether or not there is excess fat around the waistline. QUOTE]<br><br><br><br>
Does anyone else think that's pretty low?
 

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Katieq said:
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>VeganClaudia</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
In 'Eat to Live', Dr. Fuhrman suggests that on average the ideal weight for women is 95 pounds for the first 5 feet of height, and another 4 pounds for each additional inch. Its just an average that will vary by body type, but the best way to assess for each individual is to see whether or not there is excess fat around the waistline. QUOTE]<br><br><br><br>
Does anyone else think that's pretty low?</div>
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Seems low to me, too, but like everything else, it varies from person to person.<br><br><br><br>
VeggiePaella: It just sounds like your grandmother is having a hard time adjusting. Some people get over the adjustment stage and some probably won't ever. Just try and take it all in stride and have a positive attitude.
 

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Katieq said:
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>VeganClaudia</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
In 'Eat to Live', Dr. Fuhrman suggests that on average the ideal weight for women is 95 pounds for the first 5 feet of height, and another 4 pounds for each additional inch. Its just an average that will vary by body type, but the best way to assess for each individual is to see whether or not there is excess fat around the waistline. QUOTE]<br><br><br><br>
Does anyone else think that's pretty low?</div>
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Yes. The last time I weighed as low as Dr. F would suggest, was after I had stopped eating normally for weeks due to extreme stress/depression. The last time before that, I was 12 years old. And keep in mind that when I was younger my friends made fun of me for being too thin. "Spaghetti legs" they called me.
 

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Katieq said:
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>VeganClaudia</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
In 'Eat to Live', Dr. Fuhrman suggests that on average the ideal weight for women is 95 pounds for the first 5 feet of height, and another 4 pounds for each additional inch. Its just an average that will vary by body type, but the best way to assess for each individual is to see whether or not there is excess fat around the waistline. QUOTE]<br><br><br><br>
Does anyone else think that's pretty low?</div>
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I don't really think so...before I was veg, a few summers ago I was working out and playing tennis a lot. I was at 130 and I'm 5'10...I guess it varies.
 

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sorry to hear that you are going through this...I agree with the other posters cook for them ans show them how healthy and tasty veggie food can be.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/broccoli.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":bobo:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Jazzy_Grape</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Yes I can't wait until I get over the "it's-just-a-phase" period and they stop asking.<br><br><br><br>
I'm sry about your grandparents.. I'd say make them some tastey veg food and show them that you still do eat.</div>
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Agreed! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:">
 

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Sounds like your Grandmother is a bit like mine - food = love, rejection of food=rejection of love. If you want her to stop bugging you you'll need to get her involved and clued up about your new diet. Mention some of your favourite foods (that she could buy for you) when you're around her, or your favourite places to eat. It took a year, but my Nana is now buying me vege food, instead of the food she used to get me. The thing is, I don't actually need her to give me food, but if she offers and I refuse she just seems so sad, so I made sure she knows what to offer, and now I can say yes, and everyone's happy.
 
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