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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a step in the right direction!<br><br><br><br><a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3047454.stm" target="_blank">http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3047454.stm</a>
 

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I don't understand why people think that hydrogenated fats are worse than saturated fats <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/huh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":confused:"> they have the exact same chemical structure! how can one be worse than the other?
 

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Fats that have been hydrogenated are actually harder for your body to break down than naturally occuring saturated fats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Epski! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's about time these companies started taking responsibility of the crap they put in stuff. It's certainly far off from being sufficient but it's a good start anyway.
 

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hydrogenated fats are trans fats whereas naturally occuring fats are cis fats. What does this mean? If you compare two fats, one hydrogenated and one a naturally occuring saturated fat, the two molecules will be composed of the same atoms, but the shape of the molecules will be different, the atoms will be bonded together in different places. We break down trans fats poorly because such molecules do not appear in non-human nature. This is a problem because trans fats will more readily clog arteries.<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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From Dr. Weil to your ears:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.drweil.com/app/cda/drw_cda.html-command=TodayQA-questionId=198991-pt=Question" target="_blank">http://www.drweil.com/app/cda/drw_cd...91-pt=Question</a><br><br><br><br>
excerpt:<br><br><br><br>
"For example, margarine is made from liquid vegetable oils that are artificially saturated (with hydrogen) to make them semisolid. This process changes the fat molecules making them capable of damaging arteries and raising the risk for heart attack. I believe that these oils also promote cancer, inflammation, damage to the immune system and premature aging. Some of this harm is due to unnatural fat molecules (trans-fats) created in the hydrogenation process."<br><br><br><br>
Just a quick google resulted in this (plus tons others, of course):<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.heall.com/body/healthupdates/food/hydrogenatedfat.html" target="_blank">http://www.heall.com/body/healthupda...enatedfat.html</a><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Keep in mind that whenever you alter the molecular structure of anything, it becomes something different to your body and to metobolic processes. You can't say, just because it looks like fats and taste like fat, it behaves like fats.<br><br><br><br>
There are tons of technical articles on how fats are altered to become trans-fats, and the difference of their molecular structure. Just dig a little, and you can have all of your "why"s answered.
 

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go to<br><br><br><br><a href="http://google.com" target="_blank">http://google.com</a><br><br><br><br>
type in the following EXACTLY, including quotations:<br><br><br><br>
"hydrogenation" + "health"<br><br><br><br>
be sure that you put in a space between the words and the + sign.<br><br><br><br>
I would also try:<br><br><br><br>
"trans" + "fat"<br><br><br><br>
"trans" + "fat" + "health"<br><br><br><br>
etc.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by ebola</i><br><br><b>hydrogenated fats are trans fats whereas naturally occuring fats are cis fats. What does this mean? If you compare two fats, one hydrogenated and one a naturally occuring saturated fat, the two molecules will be composed of the same atoms, but the shape of the molecules will be different, the atoms will be bonded together in different places. We break down trans fats poorly because such molecules do not appear in non-human nature. This is a problem because trans fats will more readily clog arteries.<br><br><br><br>
ebola</b></div>
</div>
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cis and trans, now I get why they call them that! (Reminiscing over organic chem)<br><br><br><br>
Here is a picture explaining how molecules of the same structure can be of different shapes<br><br><a href="http://scholar.hw.ac.uk/site/chemistry/topic4.asp?outline=" target="_blank">http://scholar.hw.ac.uk/site/chemist...4.asp?outline=</a>
 

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Oh NO....NO.....NO......<br><br><br><br>
not 1,2-dichloroethene! No ..........argh.......nightmares of organic chem 201.....I....can't.....take it......<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/bigcry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":cry:">
 

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umm i heard a doc say that when we eat trans fat we might as well eat plastic.. because it as foreign as plastic to digest. it apparently never completely digests and just hangs out in your body clogging it up!<br><br><br><br>
FDA had said it will require all products containing hydro oils to have a warning on the label soon.
 

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Epinephrine: same chemical structure isn´t true.<br><br>
Ebola: nearly right.<br><br>
Hydrogenation produces cis- and trans-shaped saturated fatty acids. The industry fears having to label the contents of trans fatty acids!
 

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"they have the exact same chemical structure!"<br><br>
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Do you mean they have the same chemical composition or exact same structure? I'm no expert but the same chemical composition can have different actually arrangements of bonds between the atoms.<br><br><br><br>
This page is kindof over my head but there is some information maybe some people can extract from it.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.chemsoc.org/exemplarchem/entries/2001/caphane/lipids.html" target="_blank">http://www.chemsoc.org/exemplarchem/...ne/lipids.html</a>
 

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"Saturated fats have a uniform shape that allows them to pack together in a crystal lattice. Unsaturated fats have double bonds that introduces kinks into the hydrocarbon chain making crystal formation more difficult. This is why saturated fats have higher melting points and are solids at room temperature compared to unsaturated fats that tend to be liquids (oils)."<br><br>
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Hmmm, interesting ... soilds at room temperature is not good ...
 

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>>umm i heard a doc say that when we eat trans fat we might as well eat plastic.. because it as foreign as plastic to digest. it apparently never completely digests and just hangs out in your body clogging it up!<br><br>
>><br><br><br><br>
This isn't true. It is my understanding that trans fats are still metabolized and yield calories when metabolized. We use them. How well we use them and the effects of their use is another story.<br><br><br><br>
On that note, yum! toffutti!<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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Configuration would be the better word. The contents of carbon, hydrate, and oxygene atoms is equal in cis and trans configuration, but not the spatial configuratin (what I called structure). Any chemist around, who knows the correct nomenclature?
 
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