VeggieBoards banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So hubby decided to go veg about 8 months ago, which seemed like a wonderful decision at first and I was estatic. Problem is, he is such a picky eater and has horribly unhealthy eating habits. He despises most vegetables, whole grains, mushrooms, lentils, faux meats (other than Veggie Patch meatless meatballs, he loves those) and the only foods he has a taste for other than meat (which he LOVES) is cheese and refined carbs. He has been eating so much cheese since becoming veg that his bad cholesterol levels have increased. He is now saying that he might have to go back to eating meat because he can't live on just cheese. Everything that's remotely healthy that I make for him or that we eat out he doesn't like unless it's smothered in cheese.<br><br>
I am at the point where I just want to encourage him to go back to being omni. I really don't want to do this because other than the ethical implications I feel like it will create a divide between us, and will give his family more ammo against the veg*n lifestyle. Obviously since he is eating dairy there are still major ethical issues, I just wish I could find something he likes so he could cut back on his cheese consumption and we can actually have enjoyable meal times again! Any ideas out there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,714 Posts
Why did he decide to go veg?<br><br>
Also have either or both of you watched Forks over Knives and/or read the China Study and Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease? I don't know your husbands age but at some point he's going to realize he's mortal and his current eating habits will send him to an early grave, when that day arrives he may be more open to eating healthier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,945 Posts
I think if he keeps trying new foods, he will grow to like them, but he's got to be a manly man now and put up with eating stuff he doesn't love, with some cheese. Or he can give up, of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Forster</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3047910"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Why did he decide to go veg?</div>
</div>
<br>
He decided on his own for ethical reasons. He became curious as a result of me going veg a few years ago and realized since he won't even kill bugs in the house it does not make sense to kill animals to eat them.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Also have either or both of you watched Forks over Knives and/or read the China Study and Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease? I don't know your husbands age but at some point he's going to realize he's mortal and his current eating habits will send him to an early grave, when that day arrives he may be more open to eating healthier.</div>
</div>
<br>
He is 38 and his father was just diagnosed with type II diabetes. I was hoping that would be a wake up call but he is so stubborn about things like this.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">I think if he keeps trying new foods, he will grow to like them, but he's got to be a manly man now and put up with eating stuff he doesn't love, with some cheese. Or he can give up, of course.</div>
</div>
<br>
Yes, I agree. I told him last night that it's perfectly ok to not love everything you eat, especially when it's the right thing to do for ethical and health reasons. I hope that reasoning sticks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
That has to be tough. I get why people go vegetarian for ethical reasons, but the health benefits are also very important. Maybe you can slowly get him to try other foods. I know that Veggie Burgers are process, but Dr. Pragers and the Veggie Marsalla Burgers from Trader Joes would be a good place to start. They are so good and more healthy than meat and cheese. I don't know if you cook or like to cook, but maybe try some good soups. I am sure there are some foods he can eat that he will enjoy and be a little healther than what he is eating. I am a single guy and not much of a cook. I eat a lot of Veggie Burgers, Bananas, apples, healthy cereal with almond milk etc. If he is into spicy food or flavors maybe try to cook some green beans with Indian Spices. How about brown rice mixed with veggies and Teriyaki Sauce? There are alternatives that are not the most healthy, but still better than what he is eating. Maybe you can get him to slowly incorporate healthy foods with what he is eating and maybe he will get used to them. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>delicioso</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3047928"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think if he keeps trying new foods, he will grow to like them, but he's got to be a manly man now and put up with eating stuff he doesn't love, with some cheese. Or he can give up, of course.</div>
</div>
<br>
Agreed. Just tell him to eat what he doesn't like, and eventually he'll get used to it, and even learn to like it. They say beer is an acquired taste, so why can't vegetables and lentils be the same? You and he can also try experimenting with different recipes and ways to eat healthfully - for example I hate hate hate beans that are not just fresh beans, but I know theyre good for me so Im not ready to give up on them just yet!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,862 Posts
It's really difficult for picky eaters to change their tastes, but it is possible with time and patience. It sounds like your husband is highly motivated to be vegetarian -- I hope you can find a way to help him. I would try to focus on what he does like (or can at least tolerate). If there are some veggies he likes, put those in rotation for a while. How about carrots? Even corn and potatoes would add some nutrition and variety. Does he like things with tomato like marinara sauce or chili? How about burritos or enchiladas filled with refried beans and cheese, maybe some spinach if he's interested? Spinach hides pretty well in lots of things, like lasagna.<br><br>
As for the cheese issue, it's a tricky one. But I would say focus more on adding veggies, then later he can think about cutting back on the cheese. Chances are it will happen naturally as he finds more veggies he likes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I was a very picky eater as a child - apparently there was like a year and a half where I wouldn't touch anything but French fries and chocolate ice cream. I'm still picky, we have a few restaurants that we go to frequently and I almost always get the same thing every time in each one, and at one place my 'usual' isn't even on the menu, they make it for me because we go there all the time. I've never really liked the taste/smell/texture of meat so it isn't a sacrifice for me to give it up - more like I used to force myself to eat it to be 'normal'. I can't imagine hating veggies and loving meat and deciding to be a veg*n, it must be very hard for him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,577 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Zoe74</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3047874"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Everything that's remotely healthy that I make for him or that we eat out he doesn't like unless it's smothered in cheese.<br></div>
</div>
<br>
I'd smother it in vegan cheese. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
I feel for you I have a picky eater and that is why he will not give up the meat he is eating , he does get organic meat but, I want to get the faux meats if we need too. I agree with the rest that you just have to experiment with the veg recipes maybe he'll like it, with me I am learning more and more what we both like.
 

·
Beginner's Mind
Joined
·
645 Posts
I was raised with this whole idea of foods which one does or doesn't "dislike" as an individual; of course, it's a common paradigm, but nowadays I kind of feel like that may be completely a psychological thing. I was so addicted to cheese for so long, when I finally chose to get off of it, substituting sauces which I used to have a bias against was a big, big help. The only technically vegan items which I still think of as "food I don't like" are the most processed/artificial products. Really vital for health that we make friends with natural produce.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
437 Posts
How about hiding vegetables in things? I hate eggplant, but sometimes I'll buy a small one, roast it and puree it in a big pot of fresh tomato sauce for pasta. You can sneak other things in there, too - onions, garlic, carrots and zucchini are good ones. If you get them really smooth, use enough tomato and some tomato paste and spices, you honestly can't even taste them.<br><br>
Same idea with soup. I like to make my own tomato soup, and I make it with white beans, diced tomatoes, water and a few chopped carrots. Then I puree it all up with a hand blender, season it with spices, sneak in a little margarine for richness and let it simmer. It's delicious and perfectly smooth - you would NEVER know that there were carrots in there.<br><br>
I don't mean deceive him about what's in his food. He's old enough to know <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> He just might find that there are certain WAYS he likes vegetables that he never realized. Very often, an aversion to food is about texture. You can dice things up into slivers, puree them finely, chop them, cook them to be softer or firmer...maybe you guys can experiment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
I really can't relate to a picky eater. I know some but, I don't understand it.<br><br>
You might get him to try a decked out Subway veggie patty sandwich on 9 grain honey oat bread. That's delish. Or, scoot by Earth Fare and get a half a fig roast with mushroom gravy. Tasty. If he hates most veggies then going vegetarian's gonna be difficult. Perhaps a more starch based diet would be a direction to try. Eating mostly cheese and sweets is likely to be quite harmful over the long haul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
^^ Taste, texture, smell can all be very unappetizing and even nauseating (the smell of cooked eggs makes me almost vomit and always has). Being that I want to go veg I suppose a natural aversion to the taste, texture and smell of meat is a good thing (I've forced myself to eat 'normally' until now). There are 'supertasters' to whom some veggies taste horrible such as broccoli (which President G.H.W. Bush was famous for). I personally can't eat cilantro because it tastes like a mouthful of soap to me (but anyone can live without cilantro). There must be something you don't like to eat?
 

·
Beginner's Mind
Joined
·
645 Posts
Me, I definitely do take a lot of pleasure in different meals; I was just saying that IMO, precisely what it is that you enjoy is less ingrained and permanent as a matter of objective fact than most of us tend to think of it as being. We're either encouraged to form preferences at a very young age or else we're overtly forced in some direction which we may eagerly rebel against, and a lot of different associations accrue even while we gradually forget where they came from and what they're connected to. Then, on top of that, with some foods there are chemical effects we can have a literal dependence on, which calls up all of the tendencies to rationalize that people generally turn to when so motivated. It's like, sure I can identify with feeling like being choosy, but I personally feel better about the choices I make when I've really thought them through for myself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
I have traveled all over North America, Europe and the Mediterranean. One thing I've never been afraid to do is try something new. I've eaten squid in Greece that still looked like a squid, eyeballs and all. I've eaten pretty much everything you can get in Turkey. In Germany I ate some funky raw meat sandwich that gave me the worst food poisoning I ever imagined, the kind that has you praying to die. In Mexico I ate food from street vendors and washed it down with tequila. Canadians have awesome food. Greeks have awesome food. Turks have awesome food. Israel has awesome food. Every country I have been to has good food. In Turkey they eat lots of delicious vegetables and I ate like I was on death row with two butt holes. In a good Indian restaurant I will try every vegetarian thing they have. I've never eaten anything thing I thought was intolerable, except fishy tasting fish.<br><br>
My Grandfather grew up an orphan in Black Mountain. He was Cherokee. I loved him. He had a little cabin up in the mountains. It was bare bones. My grandfather would cook the nastiest looking, most delicious breakfast. He ate scratch made biscuits, grits and cooked apples we picked off the tree like they were the finest foods on earth. He laughed a lot and he was a happy guy. Probably the happiest guy I ever knew. That was the example that I learned to eat from.<br><br>
The goal is to be happy. As Buddha kinda said, having too many preferences in your mind will create suffering in your life. It's OK to like vanilla and chocolate, red and blue, summer and winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,548 Posts
Eh, if I can manage without vegetables, so can he.<br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>falconbrother</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050145"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Greeks have awesome food.</div>
</div>
<br>
Only if you like oil and grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Envy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050160"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Eh, if I can manage without vegetables, so can he.<br><br><br><br><br>
Only if you like oil and grease.</div>
</div>
<br>
I love oil and grease, f'n A!<br><br>
Dolmathes<br>
spanakopita<br>
Greek Salad<br>
Kolokythakia: zucchini<br><br>
Not to mention:<br>
Aginares a la Polita: artichokes with olive oil.<br>
Arakas me aginares: oven-baked fresh peas with artichokes.<br>
Bamies: okra with tomato sauce (sometimes with potatoes or during non-fasting times with chicken/lamb).<br>
Briám: an oven-baked ratatouille of summer vegetables based on sliced potatoes and zucchini in olive oil. Usually includes eggplant, tomatoes, onions, and ample aromatic herbs and seasonings.<br>
Domatokeftedes: tomato fritters with mint, fried in olive oil and typically served with fava (split-pea paste). Mainly a Cycladic island dish.<br>
Fasolakia: fresh green beans stewed with potatoes, zucchini and tomato sauce.<br>
Gemista, baked stuffed vegetables. Usually tomatoes, peppers, or other vegetables hollowed out and baked with a rice-and-herb filling or minced meat.<br>
Gigandes plaki: baked beans with tomato sauce and various herbs. Often made spicy with various peppers.<br>
Horta (greens), already mentioned in the appetizers section, are quite often consumed as a light main meal, with boiled potatoes and bread.<br>
Kinteata, dish made from boiled young nettles.<br>
Lachanodolmades: cabbage rolls, stuffed with rice and sometimes meat, spiced with various herbs and served with avgolemono sauce or simmered in a light tomato broth.<br>
Lachanorizo, cabbage with rice.<br>
Prassorizo, leeks with rice.<br>
Spanakorizo, spinach and rice stew cooked in lemon and olive-oil sauce.
 

·
Beginner's Mind
Joined
·
645 Posts
You know, on American T.V. I see all those commercials for antacids and for remedies for heartburn and other disorders caused by certain diets and it just boggles my mind all these folks drugging themselves so they can maintain their eating habits. Why not just make new habits for yourself? If your favorite foods make you sick then, duh, don't run to the pharmacy: just find some different favorites!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,658 Posts
My husband doesn't like many fruits or vegetables either but one thing he does drink is green smoothies because you cannot taste the greens if you use bananas.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>falconbrother</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3050197"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Greek Salad</div>
</div>
<br>
I used to love that when I was vegetarian. Sitting by a Greek beach eating feta cheese salad and sipping a cocktail, heaven!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top