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I'll have a hair pizza please!<br><br>
China's barber shops are about the last place you might expect to find a food ingredient. None the less, this is where the food industry obtains a good proportion of the raw material - human hair - for one of its favorite additives. It is commonly seen on packaged food ingredient lists as L - cysteine, or L - cysteine Hydrochloride (HCL). The additive can be produced in two ways: synthetically, from non-organic bases such as petroleum, or directly from human hair. It can be much cheaper to use human hair, which contains up to 8 per cent of the natural amino acid cysteine.<br><br><br><br>
Cysteine is used as a flavoring and a dough enhancer, but by the time it reaches our pizzas and snacks the hair has been thoroughly processed and reduced to its chemical constituents. Still, it is extraordinary to think that the body can be recycled and re-enter the food chain so abruptly. More extraordinary, perhaps, is the journey it makes from the the Far East to our food. Why the food - additives industry should favor hair from this particular region is clear: its homogenous abundance - China has a head count of one billion - and according to the food - ingredient expert Dr John Meyer, because "it's easy to collect nice, clean, tied - up bales of human hair there". The hair is collected, cleaned, processed and then chemically converted into L - cysteine in Far East factories.<br><br><br><br>
"There are very few renewable human resources, but cysteine is one of them," says Dr Meyer, who is responsible for sourcing kosher foods for the Jewish Orthodox Union of America. "You often find it in yeast flavors and you might find it in a savory flavor for almost anything." Muslims are also aware of its presence in food. According to Koranic law, Muslims are forbidden to eat anything containing L - cysteine because it may be derived from human hair. America is ahead in keeping track of all the added ingredients in processed food - kosher food marked with a "U" on the ingredients means it is free of L - cysteine, but elsewhere in the world there is no standard method of identifying foods containing L - cysteine.<br><br><br><br>
"L - cysteine may be present in a number of foods, but it is not always listed on the ingredients," says Richard Ratcliffe, the executive secretary of the British Food Additives and Ingredients Association. "Additives regulations in Europe require manufacturers to list additives and class them as a coloring, for example. But L - cysteine is not regarded as a food additive. It is seen as a processing aid. The food processors decide whether or not to list something like L - cysteine depending on the amounts used. "Nor, of course, do the manufacturers have to state if the L - cysteine used is hair-derived or otherwise."<br><br><br><br>
"The chemical process of converting hair to food additive has been known for a hundred years and couldn't be simpler," says Professor Derek Burke, the former chairman of the Advisory Committee on Novel Foods and Processes. For those of us who do feel queasy about hair chemicals in food, not only may the use of cysteine seem cannibalistic, but there are also chilling associations with Auschwitz, where it was produced in a hair - chemicals plant. But if cysteine's provenance appears somewhat stomach-turning, then consider the chemical's benefits. Health - supplement fans rave about it. According to a health-products retailer, cysteine is one of the body's most effective anti-oxidants and destroyers of the metabolism's toxic waste products, that are said to accelerate aging. Cysteine is also naturally produced in sulphur-containing foods such as egg yolks, red peppers, garlic, onions, broccoli and Brussels sprouts.<br><br><br><br>
The Government's of America and Europe believe cysteine, human hair-derived or otherwise, as a perfectly safe. In fact, the view is that it is just one of several additives regarded as essential if we are to continue to enjoy safe, cheap food with a long shelf life. And, say its champions, since cysteine is hairy by nature, it can help prevent hair loss and stimulate its growth.</div>
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<br><a href="http://www.keratin.com/ar/ar010.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.keratin.com/ar/ar010.shtml</a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
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Eating Human Hair by Another Name?<br><br><br><br>
L-Cysteine from human hair is haram.<br><br><br><br>
By Syed Rasheeduddin Ahmed<br><br>
Posted: 26 Rabi-ul-Awwal 1422, 18 June 2001<br><br><br><br>
Your bakery product may contain human hair and you may not even realize it. It comes in the form of L-Cysteine, a non-essential amino acid. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. There are 20 amino acids of which 8 are essential for human growth. The amount of these essential amino acids in a protein determines its quality. Casein, a milk protein, has the highest quality of protein whereas wheat proteins are lacking in amino acid Lysine, so they have less quality than milk protein.<br><br><br><br>
L is refers to levorotatory a type of optical rotation of a compound under plane-polarized light.<br><br><br><br>
L-Cysteine is used as a reducing agent in bakery products. It is used to:<br><br><br><br>
Reduce the mixing time of the flour dough.<br><br>
Stop shrinking of pizza crust after it is flattened.<br><br>
Help move the dough through various bakery processing equipments or dough conditioners.<br><br>
L-Cystein is used in Bagels, Croissants, Hard Rolls, Cake Donuts (from human hair in Dunkin Donut's cake donuts only, Yeast raised donuts do not contain L-Cysteine), Pita Bread, some Crackers and Melba Toast. It is also used as a nutrient in baby milk formula and dietary supplements.<br><br><br><br>
The source of L-Cysteine is human hair, chicken feathers, cow horn, petroleum by-products and synthetic material. It was reported by a food company that a Rabbi refused to Kosher certify L-cysteine from human hair obtained from a temple in India where hairs are cut because of religious rituals.<br><br><br><br>
L-Cysteine is manufactured in Japan, China and Germany only. Human hair is the cheapest source for L-cysteine.<br><br><br><br>
Majority of L-Cysteine used in USA is from human hair, which is its cheapest source. There is no pressure from consumers in USA and Canada to ban it.<br><br><br><br>
Some reports suggest that European Union countries are thinking to ban the use of L-Cystiene from human hair in food products. There is no pressure from consumers in USA and Canada to ban the L-Cysteine from human hair. It is a haram product for Muslims because it is a part of human body. Islam does not allow to consume any part of human body. Some Rabbis accept it as Kosher ingredient saying it is dead part of the body but some do not.<br><br><br><br>
Majelis Ulema of Indonesia has halal certified L-Cysteine from synthetic material for Ajinomoto Company and this L-Cysteine is used in USA by Caravan Products of New Jersey in their mixes for bakery industry.<br><br><br><br>
Majority of L-Cysteine used in USA is from human hair, so please read the ingredients on the package, if you find it call or write to manufacturer and find out the source of L-Cysteine and also tell them that you can not use it from human hair.</div>
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<br><a href="http://www.albalagh.net/halal/col2.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.albalagh.net/halal/col2.shtml</a><br><br><br><br>
What is cysteine/cystine?<br><br><br><br>
Also known as l-cystine, our research indicates that the source of cysteine is human hair. Cystine is an amino acid needed by humans, which can be produced by the human body. A very small quantity is used in less than 5% of all bread products. Often the hair of third world women is used.<br><br>
-<a href="http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/faqingredients.htm#cystine" target="_blank">http://www.vrg.org/nutshell/faqingredients.htm#cystine</a><br><br><br><br>
Ingredient: L-CYSTINE<br><br>
Description<br><br>
How the chemical is regulated: Flavor, Direct food additive; chemical is used as: FLAVOR ENHANCER, FLAVORING AGENT OR ADJUVANT, NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENT, DOUGH STRENGTHENER;<br><br>
Description<br><br>
According to the researh by Syed Rasheeduddin Ahmed, 99% of L-Cystine in the US is obtained from HUMAN HAIR. It is used in Pizza crusts, hard rools and crooissants. It is Kosher certified ingredient even if it is from Human hair. It is suggested check the source of L-Cystine even if the product is certified Kosher<br><br><a href="http://www.whatisinit.com/frames/frames/IngredMore.cfm?Ingredients=1068" target="_blank">http://www.whatisinit.com/frames/fra...gredients=1068</a>
 

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eeww.. gross, i hope papa johns doesnt use that stuff<br><br>
Eating other peoples hair = <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/spew.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":spew:">
 

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Discussion Starter #3
"According to a health-products retailer, cysteine is one of the body's most effective anti-oxidants and destroyers of the metabolism's toxic waste products, that are said to accelerate aging."<br><br><br><br>
I should go back to chewing the ends of my hair <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Teri</i><br><br><b>"According to a health-products retailer, cysteine is one of the body's most effective anti-oxidants and destroyers of the metabolism's toxic waste products, that are said to accelerate aging."<br><br><br><br>
I should go back to chewing the ends of my hair <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"></b></div>
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If fingernails have the same ingredient, woo-hoo!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
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<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by YumHummus</i><br><br><b><a href="http://www.keratin.com/ar/ar010.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.keratin.com/ar/ar010.shtml</a><br><br><br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.albalagh.net/halal/col2.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.albalagh.net/halal/col2.shtml</a><br><br><br><br>
According to the researh by Syed Rasheeduddin Ahmed, 99% of L-Cystine in the US is obtained from HUMAN HAIR. It is used in Pizza crusts, hard rools and crooissants. It is Kosher certified ingredient even if it is from Human hair. It is suggested check the source of L-Cystine even if the product is certified Kosher<br><br><a href="http://www.whatisinit.com/frames/frames/IngredMore.cfm?Ingredients=1068" target="_blank">http://www.whatisinit.com/frames/fra...gredients=1068</a></b></div>
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I am so glad I no longer order pizza.
 

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for some reason, this doesn't really bother me. *shrug*
 

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Now that's one of the fouler things I have read in a while.<br><br><br><br>
Sort of like hearing that there is some statistically significant number of bug parts in every can of canned soup...Yech..
 

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Yummie..Nothing surprises me...My first job was answering calls for a major cereal maker.....lets just say over the few months of answering these calls I no longer eat cereal for a morning snack....Here are a few that I recall.....spiders, moths, flies, ants, larvae eggs, condoms, cig butts, glass, fingernails, a block of sugar, burnt cereal....A lot of this crap falls out of workers pockets in the production phase of the product. I handled each call the same way...."one moment while I transfer you to a consumer relations specialist"...After leaving them on hold for 30 minutes, these people that were annoying the hell out of me with all of their problems, would finally hang up. The fine art of customer relations by KC Kid.
 

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mmmmm.<br><br><br><br>
mental note.
 

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I first read this article a long, long, time ago... but seeing this thread put it back in my head last week, when my mother went shopping and bought some flatbread instead of pitas for me. So when I read the label and shook my head, she asked what was in it and I told her the usual, and hair. She didn't believe me and demanded a printout on it, it was really funny.<br><br>
Then she showed it to her best friend, who said that doesn't bother her since it's as sanitized as everything else in food. To me there's a difference between eating something that might get my own hair in it, and eating something derived from a stranger from who knows where.<br><br>
I think I have a newfound fear of cereal now.
 

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I find hair to be kind of gross unless it belongs to me or someone close to me. I hate that there are so many ingredients that can be naturally or sythetically derived and you may not be able to tell which it is. It makes label reading really hard. I would deffinatly prefer my food without hair though thank you very much. Kiwis are about as close to "hairy food" as I want to get.
 

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truly, although the idea of great gobs of hair in my mouth doesn't appeal to me in the least (*yak*), i am nonplussed by the idea of hair being recycled into something useable. what everyone seems to forget it, even if left to decompose naturally, hair will eventually get back into the soil, and enter our food chain or water table once again, broken down into different components. you're eating lots of all kinds of things that have gone into the soil and water table all the time; other people's hair, dead things, insects, sewage, semen, blood, etc. it's just not chemically processed like this other stuff is.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just because our food grows in the ground containing all kinds of gross stuff does not mean that it is in the food. The food takes its nourishment from the ground, yes, but it is not made up from what is in the ground. Just as we take our nourishment from the food we eat that is not what we are made of. If you eat a carrot say, after it passes through your body you are not carrot you are human you have just been nourished by that carrot. It is not the same as some added ingredient to a food product. Hair yuk!
 

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yarnblossom...I think I feel pretty much the way you do. I know that there are probably some gross things in most things I eat. Little buggies ect., but to know that something is made up of hair is just really really icky. Maybe it's just a mental thing but it really does gross me out. I guess it's like saying ,well urine has some water in it and you could purify the water out untill you just have water again but I think it would be really hard to drink that water knowing it had once been part of urine. So even though the hair is being broken down into other stuff I still have it in my mind that it came from hair. (Sorry for the gross example but I couldn't think of anyhting else)
 
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