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<a href="http://channels.netscape.com/ns/pf/content.jsp?file=/pf/pm/fte.jsp" target="_blank">http://channels.netscape.com/ns/pf/c.../pf/pm/fte.jsp</a><br><br><br><br><b>How Waiters Get Us to Tip More Money</b><br><br><br><br>
Don't look now, but that nice waiter is playing little<br><br>
tricks to get you to fork over a higher tip!<br><br><br><br>
Rewarding wait staff for a job well done is something<br><br>
most restaurant patrons want to do. There is<br><br>
nothing better than an attentive waiter whose<br><br>
service makes your evening out even more special. The<br><br><b>From the Editor</b> staff loves waiters! If there's a waiter<br><br>
working, that means we're not cooking dinner that night.<br><br>
Still, what IS it that makes us leave a high tip or a paltry<br><br>
one?<br><br><br><br>
The <b>How Stuff Works Web site</b> has analyzed the<br><br>
situation. Tipping is not always a sign of a job well<br><br>
done. We tip because:<br><br>
We plan to return to that restaurant.<br><br>
It's expected.<br><br>
We don't want to look cheap.<br><br>
We feel guilty if we don't tip.<br><br>
We don't want to anger the server.<br><br>
It makes us feel better about being waited upon by someone who works hard and isn't necessarily paid well.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
And while all these reasons for tipping are legitimate,<br><br>
you may be giving a higher tip to your server because of<br><br>
little tricks he or she plays that makes you want to dole<br><br>
out the cash after dessert. How Stuff Works reports that<br><br>
researchers at Cornell University's Center for Hospitality<br><br>
Research showed that the quality of service received<br><br>
isn't always reflected in the tip. As odd as it may sound,<br><br>
servers who provide excellent service only receive a<br><br>
slightly higher tip on average than those who provide<br><br>
average service.<br><br><br><br>
So what IS going on? Cornell researchers say servers<br><br>
do these specific things to boost their chances of<br><br>
getting a higher tip from you:<br><br><br><br><b>Touching</b><br><br>
If a waiter touches the customer--a brief brush on the<br><br>
shoulder, for example--they can expect the tip to<br><br>
increase from 11.8 percent of the bill's total to 14.8<br><br>
percent of the check total. Both men and women fall for<br><br>
this. People of all ages are susceptible to it, especially<br><br>
younger customers.<br><br><br><br><b>Squatting</b><br><br>
Two different studies concluded that when waiters<br><br>
squat next to the table when they take the order, their<br><br>
customers tip more. In one study it was 17.5 percent<br><br>
instead of 14.9 percent; in the other study, the waiter<br><br>
received 15 percent instead of 12 percent. Why?<br><br>
Squatting allows the waiter to make better eye contact<br><br>
and that closer interaction creates a more intimate<br><br>
connection. And, of course, intimate connections makes<br><br>
us want to hand over more money.<br><br><br><br><b>Giving Candy</b><br><br>
Isn't it nice to get a piece of candy with your bill? Some<br><br>
of us think it's so nice that we'll tip 17.8 percent when we<br><br>
get candy, up from 15.1 percent when there's no candy.<br><br>
The Cornell researchers cite one study in which servers<br><br>
gave each customer two pieces of candy and they<br><br>
watched their tips rise to 21.6 percent of the bill. But just<br><br>
throwing the candy down isn't enough. HOW the candy<br><br>
is given has an even larger impact on how we tip. The<br><br>
best way: The server gives each member of the party<br><br>
one piece of candy and then "spontaneously" offers a<br><br>
second piece of candy. The payoff? It increased the tip<br><br>
to 23 percent of the bill.<br><br><br><br>
--Cathryn Conroy
 

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when I was waiting tables, my trick was to see how many times I could get the guest to say "thank you". the more they said it the more they believed it, and my tips went up accordingly... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
I like the candy trick....
 

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mine was that if i forgot or didn't have time to bring them something they asked for, like a glass of water, i'd usually realize it as i was walking past the table. rather than just go get it or give them a chance to remind me, i'd put on this face to make it look like i just remembered and i'd say something like "ohhhhh i totally forgot, i'm so sorry, i'm so forgetful" and then make a b-line for the server station as fast as possible. making it look like you honestly forgot and rushing to go get it rather than letting them think your other customers were more important or whatever is a good way to make sure they still tip you decent, otherwise they might pay lower than they normally would.<br><br>
personally when i'm out and my server forgets something if they apologize profusely and drop everything to go get it i end up feeling bad for making them neglect their other tables and if i initially felt angry i end up feeling really bad about it. i usually tip more.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
and the squatting thing really works, my bf swears by it. best way to get good high-tipping regulars though is to remember their order. i had a few regulars who always got the same thing and i'd usually spot them at the door and run to get their favourite table and their drinks ready for them before they even got their coats off. also eventually you learn what types of customers don't like to be bothered, some tip more if you don't check on them and just leave them be until they need you. mainly the ones who come in alone and read the paper or pull out paperwork while they're eating. with them i usually keep an eye on them from afar and when their glass is empty i bring them a refill without asking. they love that cause they don't have to look up from their paper to talk to you or get your attention
 

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I find most of those to be true though I don't think I'd like being touched by the waiter. Probably the biggest thing that impresses me is when the waiter brings refills without me having to ask and without me starting to think I'll need one.
 

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i think they mean opposite sex touching.<br><br>
if a waitress came up and started chatting with you and put her hand on your shoulder you'd be all for it, admit it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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I apologize to servers. ^^;;<br><br><br><br>
"I'm sorry, but could I please have my dressing on the side?"<br><br><br><br>
"I'm sorry, but could I please have my salad without egg on it?"<br><br><br><br>
"I'm sorry, but could you tell me if that veggie burger would be grilled on the same grill as the meat?"<br><br><br><br>
I guess because I used to work in foodservice, and I know what a hard job it is, I don't want to make things more difficult for them.<br><br><br><br>
I tip well, although I don't really follow the 15% rule...I just look at the total amount, compared to the server's performance, and give what I think is fair. On the occasions that I have calculated it to determine what percentage I was giving, it was usually at least 20%.<br><br><br><br>
I think that if a server touched me, even briefly, it would make me uncomfortable. ^^;;
 

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My mother raised me as a waitress and my sister raises her son as a bartender so i tip very well. I tip minimium of 20% and tricks would not change that.
 

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i can't NOT tip, but i have been in situations where i tipped low if the service was really bad. it has to be like really really bad though for me to tip less than 15%<br><br>
i know someone who tips 25% all the time even if the service isn't that good. i do tip more at bars than restaurants though. that's where the money is, cause people will sometimes tip you a buck per drink. considering how much some people drink when they go out, you can make a lot of money. i'm thinking about serving at a bar but i don't know if i can handle the crazy hours
 

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I think too many people use things beyond the server's control as a reason not to tip - the food tastes bad, long waits because management doesn't have enough people working, etc. I only skip tipping when I get really bad service and I know it was the server's fault and that's not often. I consider myself a good tipper and if I get really good service then I leave a really good tip.
 

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On the occassions that I go out to eat and am the one paying (doesn't happen too often, I'm usually with family), I'll try to tip somewhere between 20-30%. I haven't had much waitressing experience, but I know it must be an awful job at times. Even on the worst days, I don't think I could bring myself to only leave a dollar in tip. If a server knows s/he had a bad night, then most likely leaving an "unearned" size of tip would be even more appreciated. I always always always say thank you for everything, even the smallest stuff. I don't want to treat the server like a servant.
 

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And when I am sitting there waiting for just one person in my family to finish eating, I'll compusively start stacking up the plates from where I am sitting. I've had waitresses tell me that I don't need to do that, to which I usually smile and say, "Oh, I know, but I just felt like it." I think it's the "I don't have to" aspect that makes me want to. I know, why would I do that when I'm paying them to do it? Because I've been sittting there idly and now I want something to do! LOL I'm nuts, I know.
 

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or maybe you are just tired of staring at them plates and subconciously wished the waitress would do a better job and clear the table.<br><br><br><br>
i base my tip on many things, politeness, attitude, promptness and getting my order right. I get annoyed when my glass is empty for too long or if they dont ask if i want a refill. I dont think i would dig a waitperson touching me, i would be annoyed by it.
 

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The last time we ate out, our waiter was terrible. He was not rude at all, but he made us ask for everything again and again.<br><br>
Then he would bring a small amount... (He should have known better with two teenage boys!) I felt very frustrated when the meal was over, so I gave him 10%. (I consider that stiffing someone)<br><br>
I love a waiter or waitress that never wants a thank you, one that slips in and out without a word. I like to be asked ONCE, "Is everything okay?" Because then you can nod, if your mouth is full.<br><br>
Rather than them asking, "How is everything?"<br><br>
I would never want to be touched. I hate phoney. I want them to be professional and not my buddy. That will get them 20 - 25%.<br><br>
Another time, our waiter grilled me about being a vegan...I thought, does he want a tip at all?
 

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I waited tables in this little veg restaurant for nearly a year after I finished college. It was fun, brainless work. The squatting thing totally works. Sometimes I even sat down briefly at the table with them, especially if it was a regular. Being good to your regulars always means a good tip.<br><br><br><br>
Anyone who's ever worked in food service knows how to tip. We've all been stiffed plenty of times and know how much that sucks.
 

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yeah that's for sure. one nasty waitress i had kept talking down to me and my friends as if we were children, but we were sitting in the bar area ordering booze, and she only looked about 2 or 3 years older than me, and about the same age as most of my older friends who were there. she never came to check on us, we'd have to flag her down to order something and then she'd seem really annoyed at being bothered, even though we were like the only table she had.<br><br><br><br>
when we left my friends didn't want to leave anything and i started to walk away from the table, thought about it, and went back and tossed $2 on the table. sometimes a bad tip is more insulting than no tip.<br><br><br><br>
my worst customers for tipping were these teenagers who came in for lunch and were loud and annoying and messy, but acted really nice to me and i made sure they were happy (mainly cause the kids from that particular highschool tend to be troublemakers, especially if they don't like the service). when they left they paid by debit and said they left a tip on the table and were real nice about it. i went to the table and amongs the huge mess were pennies, one placed under each plate, glass, salt shaker etc. so i had to go around collecting them. i was extremely insulted.
 

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<a href="http://www.tipping.org/TopPage.shtml" target="_blank">The Original Tipping Page</a> <---This is very helpful.<br><br><br><br>
You're supposed to tip hairstylists 15% of the bill but what if your haircut isn't that complex? All I need to do is go to Supercuts and have the ends trimmed. I wash it beforehand and the haircut takes no more than 10 minutes. So I get a friend to trim my hair instead.<br><br><br><br>
Does anyone know why the practice of tipping exists? It would be easier to raise prices so the employees can be paid more.
 

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seriously?<br><br><br><br>
in some countries like Japan tipping is not allowed and if a tourist tries to tip a server they get very insulted. i guess they see it like flipping a coin to a peasant sort of thing, like you're looking down on them cause they make less money than you. which explains why tourists from those countries who come to US and Canada never tip and get stereotyped as cheap.<br><br><br><br>
once though someone was visiting from Scotland and came into the restaurant and was telling me how they just got off the plane and were jetlagged and all that and it was the first restaurant they found on their way from the airport etc, and mentioned that it was a lot different from restaurants back home and stuff. they were really nice and i got a kick out of the accent. when they left, they just left the cash on the table and were gone, they left me a $15 tip on like a $25 bill. insane!<br><br>
i don't know if was something to do with how they tip at home or if they didn't understand our currency or what, but from then on any time i catch a scottish accent from a customer i make sure they get put in my section <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by majake</i><br><br><b>or maybe you are just tired of staring at them plates and subconciously wished the waitress would do a better job and clear the table.<br><br></b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I don't think that's it at all. My parents sometimes habitually start stacking the dishes because they remember what working in food service was like, too. I hate food service. I mean, I hate working in it. Every so often its nice to be the beneficiary of such a miserable line of work.
 
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