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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, you will need to purchase a tub of firm tofu. It may be labeled as extra firm or super firm. The main objective here is to buy the firm and not the silken or soft tofu. When you buy tofu that is floating in the little tubs of water, it is somewhat bland with a texture similar to cantaloupe or honeydew melon. It is only after you cook it (bake, deep fry, etc.), that it takes on a chewy texture making it more suitable for some recipes.<br><br><br><br>
A fine example of seasoned textured tofu is the triangle shaped pieces commonly used at chinese restaurants in their stir fries. Those pieces have been marinated and deep fried to take on the texture and flavor they have.<br><br><br><br>
You can buy pre-seasoned textured tofu in many shapes and flavors, however, you have no control over the ingredients, etc.. Also, it is almost impossible to find some of the shapes and flavors in organic. By learning how to prepare your own tofu from the basic block form, you can always buy organic and you can always have the shape and flavor you want.<br><br><br><br><b>Deep Fried Tofu</b><br><ol class="decimal"><li>Drain a tub of firm tofu.<br></li>
<li>Cut into your desired shapes.<br></li>
<li>Marinate tofu pieces in your preferred marinade.<br></li>
<li>Heat oil in a deep frying pan.<br></li>
<li>Fry tofu in 350 F oil until it turns brown.<br></li>
<li>Store in covered container (no water) until ready to use.<br></li>
<li>Your chewy tofu is ready to add to almost any vegan dish now. You can also eat a slice in a sandwich.<br></li>
</ol><br><br><br>
You can also bake your tofu, etc. to achieve the desired chewy texture.<br><br><br><br>
Note: I am a raw foodist and I do not consume tofu. I do, however, assist friends and family in preparing it.<br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/f/f5/f5322013_vbattach4753.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/f/f5/525x525px-LL-f5322013_vbattach4753.jpeg" style="width:250px;height:270px;"></a><br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/d/d9/d98db3fc_vbattach4754.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/d/d9/525x525px-LL-d98db3fc_vbattach4754.jpeg" style="width:300px;height:225px;"></a>
 

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I have been giving a lot of thought to baked tofu this week. I am wondering if most people freeze it first and also what some good seasonings are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
jaynesh, actually, freezing tofu first will give it more texture.<br><br><br><br>
As far as seasonings go, you can marinate the tofu in spices used in the category of cuisine your recipe falls into - for example, for stir fry: marinate with ginger, garlic, soy sauce, sesame oil and five spice powder; for indian foods: ginger, garlic, curry, cumin, fenugreek, etc.; Italian: oregano, garlic, olive oil, basil... you get the idea.<br><br><br><br>
I would marinate in the refrigerator for at least one hour, but overnight is better.<br><br><br><br>
Note: this is a perfect use for zip-lock baggies -- put tofu and marinade in a baggie, zip it almost closed, then (similar to, but the reverse of, blowing up a balloon) "inhale" to remove remaining air and enhance the marinade-tofu contact.
 

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Defenitely freeze it first. Besides the texture being worlds better, it will absorb your marinade a lot better.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>misq17</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Defenitely freeze it first. Besides the texture being worlds better, it will absorb your marinade a lot better.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br><br><br>
Question about freezing- is it supposed to turn a creepy yellow colour?
 

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LizC - yes, tofu will turn a weird yellow color when frozen.<br><br>
Frozen (then thawed) tofu is totally different than non-frozen tofu, it all depends on what texture you like.<br><br><br><br>
I only freeze tofu occasionally - I prefer it fresh. And I usually don't marinate it either (unless it's been frozen) because in my experience, no matter HOW long you marinate non-frozen tofu, it really doesn't absorb anything or change in texture.<br><br><br><br>
I also would strongly suggest NOT "inhaling" the excess air out of zip-top baggies. Great way to accidently aspirate liquid or bits of tofu - NOT great for your lungs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Special thanks to everyone for your replies.<br><br><br><br>
When you freeze tofu, it will alter the color. However, it definitely helps improve the texture (for recipes where you want more texture).<br><br><br><br>
When marinating, you can use a FoodSaver or other vacuum packaging system to remove the air out of the vacuum sealable bags. You must use bags specifically made for the FoodSaver or other vacuum packaging system. You can not use Ziploc baggies in a FoodSaver. Just use the manual vacuum option so you can stop the vacuum as soon as you have removed the excessive air. Be careful not to pull liquids into the unit and be careful not to get any marinate in the end of the bag where you're sealing.<br><br><br><br>
In addition, if you use the Ziploc baggies, you can just press out the excessive air. This should be fine if you want to do it this way.<br><br><br><br>
Before marinating, you can also press tofu to remove moisture. Tofu will absorb more flavor if you press it first (as excessive moisture in the tofu will hinder it from absorbing the marinade). To press tofu, first turn the block of tofu on its side and cut it in two slices of even thickness.(or whatever shape works for you, this is just an example of how you can cut it for pressing). On a cutting board or shallow plate, etc., wrap the slices in paper towels and then add a couple pounds of weight, a cast iron skillet is a good example (not a hot one). You could then complete other kitchen duties while the tofu is being pressed. There is no set amount of time for it to press. It should be ready when you are through with your other food prep work.<br><br><br><br>
My thread is just intended to be an informative thread on the preparation of tofu. It by no means is intended to be the only way to do it. Also, baking tofu is healthier than deep frying. I just listed deep frying because the friends and family I have prepared it for really liked it. You can cook tofu any way you like.<br><br><br><br>
Feel free to post any questions and I will try to answer them to the best of my ability.
 
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