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Thank you guys for such thoughtful and inspiring responses in my other thread. I am also wondering if you guys adjust how you frame your arguments in your attempt to influence someone to become vegan. What if, for example, your intended target does not respond to the suffering other animals must endure, this suffering being that which constitutes your primary motivation to be vegan? Do you then emphasize other potential motivations, such as health benefits? Do you adjust and cater to your target in any way?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by corey3 View Post

Thank you guys for such thoughtful and inspiring responses in my other thread. I am also wondering if you guys adjust how you frame your arguments in your attempt to influence someone to become vegan. What if, for example, your intended target does not respond to the suffering other animals must endure, this suffering being that which constitutes your primary motivation to be vegan? Do you then emphasize other potential motivations, such as health benefits? Do you adjust and cater to your target in any way?
Of course you cater to your target, all facets of veg*nism are reasons to go veg*n, so using a reason is just that. If that relates to them better, that's *their* reason for switching/thinking about switching. People don't reason things the same, so whatever fact relates to them the best is the right route.
 

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I'm only persistent with loved ones. I've found that if if you simply supply a trickle of vegan information here and there as a gentle nudge, eventually (after years) the person will lean towards vegan. Every now and then someone will just flat-out go vegan, but that's not very common.

For everyone else, I just give the standard: basic VO leaflet and gladly answer any questions they have. I try to listen to what they're asking to determine what is important to them and then give them information that's tailored to their priorities.
 

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I try not to seem like I am pushing them to become vegan. I just casually give out information in random talks etc. My boyfriend became vegan one month after me. And my mom is more and more open to it. She is starting to try out recipes etc. She actually talked about it with my grandma (who has diabetes) and they are both coming over saturday to 'explore vegan cooking'


Strangely tho, with 'Omnis' the health aspect of veganism is MUCH more shocking/striking to them that the animal point (which is the reason why I am vegan). So I just bought 'The Chine Study' for some family members. And they then spread the word.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by corey3 View Post

Thank you guys for such thoughtful and inspiring responses in my other thread. I am also wondering if you guys adjust how you frame your arguments in your attempt to influence someone to become vegan. What if, for example, your intended target does not respond to the suffering other animals must endure, this suffering being that which constitutes your primary motivation to be vegan? Do you then emphasize other potential motivations, such as health benefits? Do you adjust and cater to your target in any way?
I find a new target. Not every person alive will be persuaded by a compassionate message, but a significant portion of the college aged population will be. People who adopt veganism for moral reasons tend to stick with the decision the longest, often for life. The longer someone abstains from animal products the more animals are spared. It's my honest intention to spare animal suffering rather than pushing veganism at any cost, and the health argument often collapses under its own exaggerations and contradictions.

By leafleting colleges, concerts and other areas frequented by young people with the colorful, well cited booklets produced by Vegan Outreach and Mercy For Animals, large numbers of young people can be reached in relatively short time periods. Rather than devoting large amounts of my limited time and energy with one on one conversations with people in my personal life, I can actually convince dozens of people a year at least to stop eating meat in this way - and each one will spare roughly 2000 animals in their life. Since it's my intention to save as many as I can, this is the approach I take and support with small donations.
 

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I believe the best result would be if you are not trying to influence anybody. The best you can do is with your own life, attitudes, behaviors show that your vegan choice gives you a great possibility to be a better human being. And when people are inspired by you, they will almost become jealous and will want to learn about your lifestyle.
 

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I've found the best influence I have on those around comes from leading by example.
Been vegan around 6 years, the first few years most of my family and friends would never consider eating veg and pretty much thought I was crazy, they wouldn't eat my food much. Over the past few recent years my best friend, my boyfriend, my brother and several classmates have began to eliminate their animal consumption, some have gone full vegetarian. I kinda take some credit for these transformations because they would not be eating like this if they didn't know me and see how much my health has improved since being vegan.

I luv food! This is my best tool for influencing others. Most of my family events and gatherings are focused food, I try to always bring some awesome dish and usually just include it with the spread of other foods (not mentioning its animal free until after people have tried it). This has worked great, when people see that vegan food is just as good (and often better) it becomes more appealing.

I stay in shape, which is pretty easy with a healthy vegan diet. I used to struggle with toning my waist and keeping my upper arms tight (I attribute this to eating a lot of cheese, bc as soon as I stopped the weight fell off). This is my second best way to influence others. It takes work to be in shape, it takes even more work when consuming animal products
Anytime I get a compliment on my physique or how my body has changed for the better I mention my diet and how easy it is to maintain my body.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh James xVx View Post

the health argument often collapses under its own exaggerations and contradictions.
That's absurd. A more accurate statement is:
The health argument for veganism, when made by ignorant people, is less persuasive for some people than the ethical argument. This is a good reason to become educated on the health aspects of a plant-based diet; it is not a good reason to avoid discussing the health benefits of decreasing or eliminating animal products from one's diet.
 

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I don't really go out there with the mission to convert people. I always try to be a positive representation of veganism so that others might feel encouraged to try it, but so far two people have become vegetarian because of me, simply of my trying to a good example. I prefer this approach.
 

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As far as I can see, concern for animals is the only factor which will convince someone to go full-on vegan. Arguments for health, the environment, etc. will only convince people to be mostly vegan, and from the dietary angle only. There's nothing - to my knowledge - particularly environmentally destructive about animal experimentation. You're also not going to develop heart disease from eating Jell-O or other foods that contain trace animal ingredients, or even the very occasional ice cream sundae or small piece of steak as a treat. It's akin to how smoking one joint (or, make it legal, one cigarette) a year isn't going to do any substantial, long-term damage to your lungs.

As for the OP's question, sometimes I try other angles if concern for animals fails (usually health), but I sometimes get discouraged. I don't hide that I'm judging people, but I also don't do it in a mean way (I don't think). I make comparisons with people (what if it was people living in those conditions?), and try to get people to put themselves in the place of the animals. I try to get people to consider their priorities: is having ice cream or cheesecake more important to you than it is to the cow and her calf to be together, to live their lives with the natural bond they would have if it weren't for human interference, etc. I tell them about some of the things animals go through... I try to get them to care about that, even if initially they seem apathetic.

I think the big thing is to get people to realize that this isn't the same as asking for charity on behalf of some cause. I think people are - myself included - often overwhelmed by the vast amount of suffering in this world. A lot of people tend to shrink back and say, "Well, I can't help everyone, and if I'm going to help someone, it's going to be humans before animals." The thing people don't realize is that this isn't the same as going out of your way to help someone in trouble. This is about ceasing to put that someone in the situation that they're currently in. This isn't about helping, it's about ceasing to harm.

So I try to get people to think about that. If people would rather spend their time helping human causes, I don't see that as a problem. I just want them to stop hurting animals: they don't have to go and start attending protests, doing vegan outreach, etc. Being vegan is the minimum we should all be doing, in my opinion.
 
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