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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<b>How to guide young kids choose to eat healthy themselves ?</b><br><br><br><br>
When my young son is with me, he is exposed to good and healthy food. We rarely eat meals outside as well.<br><br><br><br>
But when my son is at school or school bus on his own, he cannot stop the temptation to take those junk food, snacks, candies shared by his schoolmates.<br><br><br><br>
He is 7 now, he just cannot stop this habit everyday.<br><br><br><br>
Any good books, video, audio i can make use of to reinforce him about the importance of healthy eating ?<br><br><br><br>
Besides the junk food issue, all these processed food do contain all kinds of animal ingredients.<br><br><br><br>
I told my son yesterday by showing him the ingredient label of a pack of candy he ate.<br><br><br><br>
That candy contain beef as ingredient, next to countless chemical names. Obviously, my son has not read it or neglecting it.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for your help and sharing
 

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Continue to set good examples at home, that's just about all yu can do...<br><br><br><br>
7 is too young to read labels and fully understand them, and too young to understand all about - or remember - all those trace ingredients. Heck, there's ingredients I miss and I've been doing this all my life!<br><br><br><br>
This is also a time when peer pressure becomes very important and quite possibly he'll cave in. This does not make you less of a parent, or mean that he is giving up on vegetarianism. It just means he's "spreading his wings" a bit.<br><br><br><br>
Just keep reinforcing good choices at home and when you're out together and remind him why you make these choices. He may grow up to have a different point of view than you do - that's one of the risks of parenting.
 

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I can only speak from my experiences as a child since I haven't had my own children yet, but I would caution you against making a big deal about him trying junk foods and non-veg items. When I was growing up, my mother was not veg, but she was health-conscious and wouldn't let me eat any sugary snacks. As a result, I snuck them whenever I could, and when I left home I reveled in the fact that I could now eat whatever I wanted. I gained a lot of weight and became generally unhealthy. It took me years to finally arrive at the healthy eating habits I practice today.<br><br><br><br>
When I have children, I plan to only make vegan foods for my child, but if at a certain age his/her father or friends want to offer him animal products or junk food, I'm not going to object too strongly. I will just try to lead by example and have conversations where I explain why I eat the way I do, rather than reprimanding the child for eating anything I find objectionable. I don't want my child to have some of the food issues I had (and still struggle with sometimes), and if that means that he/she sometimes eats things that make me cringe, so be it. I hope I would raise a child to be a sensitive, thoughtful individual who will eventually make wise choices, but I don't feel I can force that without it backfiring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
he has problem on maintaining healthy eating rather than maintaining vegetarian.<br><br><br><br>
It is purely because of snack food sharing practice among kids. Kids become intoxicated on it after eating them daily.<br><br><br><br>
First kids are very tempt to accept the snack food pass to them. Taste override everything in their minds to them. it is free, look nice and smell good, why not take it ?<br><br><br><br>
Very soon, he will just buy snack food himself too.<br><br><br><br>
But it is relatively fewer instances for kids to share or pass meat around as snack.<br><br><br><br>
Besides, my little son seems to be able to refuse obvious non-veg things than junk foods.
 

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I don't know..why not let him have *some* (not a lot, of course) junk food?<br><br><br><br>
He's a kid, he shouldn't feel left out..and if he is deprived of something he wants to eat and/or feels he isn't allowed to eat, he will end up sneaking it later or grow up and be like, "MAN, JUNK FOOD IS GREAT" and over-eat frequently.<br><br><br><br>
The importance of eating healthy foods should be explained to him of course..but seven is a little young to grasp that concept. All that matters to a seven year old, no matter how intelligent, is what tastes good. Really, seven year olds have no concept of their body or how their organs are affected by what they put in their stomachs. And they shouldn't - they are just kids. Kids should be allowed to have some fun and take advantage of their fast metabolisms before they get older and decide to watch what they eat.<br><br><br><br>
Also, just because he is a boy, don't assume that he can't develop an eating disorder at a later age, if he learns at a very young age that he had to be careful of what he ate and that junk food has chemicals that are bad for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
>> why not let him have *some* (not a lot, of course) junk food?<br><br><br><br>
because the way i see the harm from junk food and candies is not like the others.<br><br><br><br>
>> He's a kid, he shouldn't feel left out..and if he is deprived of something he wants to eat and/or feels he isn't allowed to eat, he will end up sneaking it later or grow up and be like, "MAN, JUNK FOOD IS GREAT" and over-eat frequently.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
i still want to prove this theory wrong.<br><br>
Although he is failed right now, i will not give up to assist him to overcome the temptation of junk food and classmates' influences<br><br><br><br>
>> but seven is a little young to grasp that concept.<br><br><br><br>
i don't think so.<br><br>
Why ?<br><br>
Because my son already asked me about what happen after died at age 3. And i told him about reincarnation theory to him at age 3, now he is 7.<br><br><br><br>
>> no matter how intelligent, is what tastes good.<br><br><br><br>
agree.
 

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Health food, vegetarian food... It really doesn't matter... he's seven, he's not going to understand and appreciate everything the way you do when it comes to food choices.<br><br><br><br>
I think you're making way too big an issue of it and it's only going to push him into eating MORE junk food than if it was treated casually.<br><br><br><br>
Ask nearly ANYONE (adult) with unhealthy eating issues regarding snacking/sugar/etc, and they will undoubtedly say their parents restricted, forbade or severely limited "junk foods" when they were children. Study after study indicates it really doesn't do a lot of good in the long run because there's that whole rebound effect.<br><br><br><br>
I certainly don't think there's anything wrong with setting a healthy example at home, and watching closely what you eat at home, and while out. That's a good thing. He probably will eventually develop tastes and preferences for what is healthy - AT SOME POINT!!<br><br><br><br>
But you cannot control what he does when he's at school or away from you and trying to do so will not be very effective.<br><br><br><br>
When he's with peers, he's trying his hardest to be a typical 7 year old and fit in - he isn't going to be thinking about nutrition or junk food vs. healthy...
 

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All my friends whose parents were very strict about junk food went junk food crazy once they had freedom to eat what they wanted. The more "forbidden" something is, the more desired it is.<br><br><br><br>
It may help, in general, to pack him a large enough lunch that he isn't hungry after he eats it, and thus would be more likely to take food from other kids. Though at his age, I'd thing the lesson in sharing is equally as important as the lesson in eating healthy. Sending treats in that he could share sometimes would probably make him happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
>>he's seven, he's not going to understand and appreciate everything the way you do when it comes to food choices.<br><br><br><br>
i want to prove it wrong, or at least it is a individual case<br><br><br><br>
>> Ask nearly ANYONE (adult) with unhealthy eating issues regarding snacking/sugar/etc, and they will undoubtedly say their parents restricted, forbade or severely limited "junk foods" when they were children. Study after study indicates it really doesn't do a lot of good in the long run because there's that whole rebound effect.<br><br><br><br>
it could be the case. i heard it years before this theory, therefore i will be very careful on my doing too.<br><br>
But i believe far more adult people eating junk now without change are having the habit well developed since kids too. They just won't give up. they will give it up only until their body has serious problems.<br><br><br><br>
>> But you cannot control what he does when he's at school or away from you and trying to do so will not be very effective.<br><br><br><br>
of course i know.<br><br>
what i do is i wish he can do the self control.<br><br>
as i can not restrict or forbid what he eat away from me,<br><br>
so the theory to accuse it is their parents being so strict is the cause for them to be junk food eaters later made me feel the theory is not that reasonable.<br><br><br><br>
Now kids are away from parents to full day school at very early ages, since 3-4. How can "adult junk food eaters" still blame their cause for eating big junk now is still their parents' limiting them ?? how?<br><br><br><br><br><br>
>> When he's with peers, he's trying his hardest to be a typical 7 year old and fit in - he isn't going to be thinking about nutrition or junk food vs. healthy...<br><br><br><br>
to fit in he need to eat meat too<br><br><br><br>
>> Though at his age, I'd thing the lesson in sharing<br><br><br><br><br><br>
because of food allergy issue,<br><br>
the school prefer no "prepared food sharing" among kids.<br><br>
but sharing candies and junk food is exception i guess.
 

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then prove it wrong and do what you think is best.<br><br><br><br>
in my personal opinion, you can talk about junk foods in the same way that you would talk about drugs. you can talk about why they're unhealthy, what the reprocussions of eating them are, and what your experience is. you can lead by example, and then allow the child to make his own decision. and maybe he'll follow your reasoning and maybe he won't.<br><br><br><br>
my parents never told me that drinking alcohol or doing drugs was 'bad.' they did tell me that doing these things had reprocussions physically, emotionally, socially, and so on. they also pointed out that not doing these things had benefits (whatever the social drawbacks may be).<br><br><br><br>
they taught my sister the same. she drinks (moderately) and i do not drink at all. she partied more than me (in college), and i didn't at all (in the sense of getting drunk and what not). so, two kids, same message, different choices.<br><br><br><br>
you can talk to him about peer pressure (in general and in specific to foods/drugs/clothes and behavoirs), you can talk to him about the problems of junk foods, and you can provide him with all the information available.<br><br><br><br>
but you have to let him learn his own thing.<br><br><br><br>
also, if kids are sharing food, why not make a healthy alternative for him to share? for example, stuffed dates are a great sweet food that are completely healthy. take dates, chop them up, add nuts of some sort (chopped) and roll in coconut. or make "sugared plums" which are essentially dried dates and apricots rolled in nuts, powdered sugar, cocoa nibs or whatever else to make them 'dry' and not sticky.
 

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ah, you are the perfect recipient for Jennifer Schmoo's blog and book! Visit her at <a href="http://www.veganlunchbox.com" target="_blank">www.veganlunchbox.com</a>. She has a 7 year old son who she makes up grand vegan lunches in a special lunchbox from <a href="http://www.laptoplunches.com" target="_blank">www.laptoplunches.com</a>, and she posts his comments each day on her blog that has won loads of awards. Her book is really beautiful, and each recipe includes PCRM health guidelines like fruits and snacks. I'd join her blog, as this would perfect for you, and you will get lots of support from other mothers who have gone through the same!
 

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Another vote against trying to demonize junk food. I never eat junk food - you won't find fruity pebbles or anything with artificial colors at my house. But I also wont put it on par with things like drugs or doing unsafe things. Everything has a priority, if everything is off limits, kids wont respect the limits and will try to break through them.<br><br><br><br>
One of my best friends was raised on vegetarian health food and when she went to college lived off diet coke and doritos. She stayed vegetarian but healthy? No way. Now she's done a complete 180 and eats very healthy foods and exercises regularly. But personally, as a future parent, I don't want to demonize everything. Drugs and the like have negative effects and I will teach my kids that. I will teach them that junk food is empty calories and can have negative effects too, but obviously those effects are not as detrimental as drugs and alcohol. In moderation the occasional treat is not going to hurt him. In a way, it could teach him important lessons about moderation.<br><br><br><br>
You might want to "prove that wrong" but I've seen a lot of instances of it. I think you might be fighting a losing battle against yourself - eating a snickers bar once in a while is the least of bad things that can happen to kids today. Let him learn to appreciate that junk food is for a once in a while treat, that it has value in that respect, but other than that, it has no value as "food" and that he needs to nourish his body so he can grow big and strong and healthy. He's only 7, he's too young to appreciate cholesterol and buildup in his arteries. But most 7 year olds want to grow up big and strong. Speak in terms he can understand, and set limits, but I would save the "outright outlawing" measures to something of greater importance.
 
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