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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband and I practice a pretty strict locavore type of diet. We only buy our produce from local farms, and since we're just now switching to a vegetarian diet we used to buy our meat from local butchers.
Now that we're getting into Autumn and Winter I'm wondering how will we keep our locavore lifestyle while incorporating a vegetarian lifestyle. We will be growing during winter time, salad greens, leeks, carrots, swiss chard, salsify, spinach and onions in a hoop house and I canned massive amounts of green beans, tomatoes. Anyone ever have this quandary?
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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There are seriously local butchers where you live? o_O
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yup. There is one right down the road from where I live. I have to admit, I'm mostly going Vegetarian for the health benefits not for the other reasons that seem pretty common. Actually normally we eat a vegetarian meal about 2 to 3 times a week, meat the other nights so the shift to Lacto Ovo vegetarian won't be too extreme to us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh, well that's the one thing we don't buy locally.
Beans and grains. Actually we do grow some of our beans but not enough to produce to last the entire year.
Herbovicious, actually I grew up going into my Great Uncles Sausage and meat shop in Chicago. It was a traditional German/Romanian butcher shop. The smell of a old fashioned butcher shop brings a smile to my face with great fondness for my family that still reside there.
 

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Shouldn't be a problem then, especially if you are going lacto ovo. I would stay away from cheese and milk for my health though, if I were you. Dairy is always the first thing most health practitioners advise people to get rid of if they want to get healthy.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamara94 View Post

Hubby and I both really love meat, cheese, eggs, milk, etc but I'm concerned about our health.
Actually normally we eat a vegetarian meal about 2 to 3 times a week, meat the other nights so the shift to Lacto Ovo vegetarian won't be too extreme to us.
Can you please respect the fact that this board is full of vegetarians and vegans who don't eat meat out of compassion for animals and a lot of us really don't want to know how much you love it and how often you ate it. Thanks.
 

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Originally Posted by tamara94 View Post

The smell of a old fashioned butcher shop brings a smile to my face with great fondness for my family that still reside there.
Gag.

I was wondering about the beans and grains thing. Sounds like you can live very easily without eating meat and have plenty to eat.
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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Originally Posted by Herbivorous B.I.G. View Post

There are a ton here in chicago.
Really? Meh, maybe its weird to me because I've always been a west coaster.
 

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Originally Posted by River View Post

Really? Meh, maybe its weird to me because I've always been a west coaster.
I'm on te west coast and there's tons of local burgers here, too.
People even sell raw meat like that at our agricultural festivals, it's disgusting.
 

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Just because the butchers you used to buy from were local doesn't mean the animals were raised locally or that all the feed fed to the animals was grown locally. Chances are that meat wasn't as local as you thought it was.

But here's the main thing really: try to re-evaluate why you are locavores in the first place. If it's for the environment then the only animals you should be eating are ones that were raised on small farm and were fed organic natural feed. And even then you shouldn't be eating very many of them - in fact most of your meals should already be purely plants if you're truly eating for the benefit of the planet.

So then you just need to decide which vegetarian or vegan options to choose to replace the small amounts of animals you're used to eating. Obviously, if you're concerned about the environment then the choices should be organic unprocessed foods that are as local as possible. So think: beans, tofu, seitan.

Here are some resources to learning more about eating for the planet in a style that's vegan and/or local:
http://www.vegansoapbox.com/locavore-vs-vegan/
 

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Hi, Tamara. There's at least one "localvore" group in my area and I occasionally order produce through them, but they're not vegetarian or vegan. Lately I've made an effort to eat food produced from not too far away (for example, from local farmer's markets or the East Coast, as opposed to the opposite side of the country or Europe). My local food co-op often has a note to indicate what items in the store are produced locally.

Localvore veg*ism is certainly doable, but I would think that eating would become progressively more complicated with each new restriction. Some personal examples: my vegan diet is very grain-heavy, but New York State isn't a major grain producer, except for corn- and that's mostly sweet corn, not the kind you would use to make tortillas. I understand soft white wheat is grown on the border with Pennsylvania, and I've grown small amounts of spring wheat, corn, and dry beans- but I'm not even close to being self-sufficient. And it's really nice to have something like rice, peanuts, or citrus fruit- none of which grow here, I don't think, except maybe citrus fruit (if you have a fairly large greenhouse!)

Hmmm. Eating locally might get easier if you preserve a lot of locally-produced foods... freezing, canning, drying... I've grown popcorn and acorn squash. They were easy to store for eating during the winter.
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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Originally Posted by disney.jessica View Post

I'm on te west coast and there's tons of local burgers here, too.
People even sell raw meat like that at our agricultural festivals, it's disgusting.
Local burgers, sure, but I have actually *never* seen an actual butcher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yup, our butcher down the road is actually a true local butcher. Sure they get some things from other states but most is local. I won't go into further details so I don't cause offense to others.
I'm thinking of starting to make tempeh but I'm trying to get used to its "taste". It tastes supremely bitter to all of us. We love tofu but I've heard so many negative reports about it. We love nuts, beans, and cheese (hence the lacto bit) so protein will surely not be lacking. A wonderful salad with fresh grown tomatoes, onions, some bean sprouts and maybe a slice of cheese is a wonderful main dish for us along with fresh baked bread!
I'm sorry if I've offended any here. I'm just looking for new ideas switching to a Vegetarian lifestyle. I was not raised that way, in fact my family (parents, aunts, uncles) are decidedly AGAINST this way. This is all new to me and I was unaware of how people who were vegans/vegetarians felt. I think due to the responses I might refrain from speaking here or asking questions much more because I really don't want to offend anyone by asking questions such as this, like how does one go about changing from an average "american diet" over to a healthier vegetarian locavore diet. Again, I'm truly sorry for my honesty and my questions about this type of lifestyle. I'd love to adopt this lifestyle.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamara94 View Post

Yup, our butcher down the road is actually a true local butcher. Sure they get some things from other states but most is local. I won't go into further details so I don't cause offense to others.
I'm thinking of starting to make tempeh but I'm trying to get used to its "taste". It tastes supremely bitter to all of us. We love tofu but I've heard so many negative reports about it. We love nuts, beans, and cheese (hence the lacto bit) so protein will surely not be lacking. A wonderful salad with fresh grown tomatoes, onions, some bean sprouts and maybe a slice of cheese is a wonderful main dish for us along with fresh baked bread!
I'm sorry if I've offended any here. I'm just looking for new ideas switching to a Vegetarian lifestyle. I was not raised that way, in fact my family (parents, aunts, uncles) are decidedly AGAINST this way. This is all new to me and I was unaware of how people who were vegans/vegetarians felt. I think due to the responses I might refrain from speaking here or asking questions much more because I really don't want to offend anyone by asking questions such as this, like how does one go about changing from an average "american diet" over to a healthier vegetarian locavore diet. Again, I'm truly sorry for my honesty and my questions about this type of lifestyle. I'd love to adopt this lifestyle.
You needn't eat tempeh if you don't like it. Beans and grains are full of protein. You needn't worry about tofu. Folk in Asia have been eating it for centuries.
 

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Herbivorous Urchin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disney.jessica View Post

Sorry, my phone autocorrected my typo to burgers, I meant butchers.
I know, I LOL'd at it
 
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