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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Struggling with my diet at the moment

Does anybody know the requirements of Protein / Carbs per day

There's a thread on this board somewhere that says 100g per day of protein for those who are active, which is loads!

I'm female, relatively active, THIN. In recovery for ED and trying to readdress the balance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How much on average?

I don't particularly want to post my weight but I'm 5ft7 and do 1 - 2 hours yoga per day.

Weight is underweight and trying to gain. Say under 50KGs
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by acfj View Post

Hi

Struggling with my diet at the moment

Does anybody know the requirements of Protein / Carbs per day

There's a thread on this board somewhere that says 100g per day of protein for those who are active, which is loads!

I'm female, relatively active, THIN. In recovery for ED and trying to readdress the balance.
hehe that was me. but im sort of an outliar from all the exercise i do. ideally protein should be around 45-60g a day, unless of course your like me
 

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I'm not worried about cutting carbs at all so I keep track of the protein and it tends to balance my carbs out. I always eat more carbs than protein ("good" carbs) since i believe that's how the human body is supposed to be, but since I lift weights I try to get at least half my body's weight (lbs, not kilos) in grams of protein. For instance, I think I weight around 140lbs so I try to keep it at least 70g protein. I sometimes go over that, but I try never to be under.

I read that once in a book on lifting weights; not for the pros, who get more, but for people like me who lift a medium amount. I also try to keep the fat really low, but tofu is actually high in fat. My protein seems sufficient since when I am serious I still do gain muscle.

T
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Tofu is low in fat and extremely healthy....!

Tofu is made from boiled Soya milk and an agent to turn it into curd (vinegar, nigari, etc) , there are no added fats in its raw form.

If you deep fry Tofu or cook it in loads of sauces then obviously you'll pick up extra fat

Cauldron Tofu for example.

per 100g

Energy 99kcal/412KJ,

Protein 10.5g,

Carbohydrate Protein 1.3g,

Fat 5.7g.

Soy nuts are the lowest fat 'nuts' (they're not really nuts I think)

In terms of gaining muscle 'weight lifters' style then they work in cycles of carb loading (which they do during training and weight gaining) and loading on lean proteins (when they're not training).

I must say that I rely on soy and tofu ALOT for my protein and would like to introduce more proteins. I have (some nuts) but mostly its tofu, tempeh, quinoa, eggs and quorn. Not a great variety really is it? Seitan is another option but is expensive. I need to find something cheap.....
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by acfj View Post

Tofu is low in fat and extremely healthy....!

Tofu is made from boiled Soya milk and an agent to turn it into curd (vinegar, nigari, etc) , there are no added fats in its raw form.

If you deep fry Tofu or cook it in loads of sauces then obviously you'll pick up extra fat

Cauldron Tofu for example.

per 100g

Energy 99kcal/412KJ,

Protein 10.5g,

Carbohydrate Protein 1.3g,

Fat 5.7g.

Soy nuts are the lowest fat 'nuts' (they're not really nuts I think)

In terms of gaining muscle 'weight lifters' style then they work in cycles of carb loading (which they do during training and weight gaining) and loading on lean proteins (when they're not training).

I must say that I rely on soy and tofu ALOT for my protein and would like to introduce more proteins. I have (some nuts) but mostly its tofu, tempeh, quinoa, eggs and quorn. Not a great variety really is it? Seitan is another option but is expensive. I need to find something cheap.....
Tofu is very high in fat, as the data you posted shows. The 5.7 g of fat translates into 51 calories. Since the total calories given is just 99, the tofu is 52% fat by calories. This is typical; most tofu is 40%-60% fat calories. Nutritionists recommend that one get no more than 30% calories from fat (less for weight loss). So the tofu is fine, but it needs to be eaten in conjuction with low-fat foods, like rice, pasta, vegetables, etc. Tofu by itself is one of the highest fat of all vegan foods.
 

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Originally Posted by VeggieMe View Post

some people say 1 gram per pound of your weight, but I think that's way too much protein
I thought that was per kg of body weight, not per pound. So divide your weight in pounds by 2.2 to get your weight in kilograms. The other estimate I've seen is that you should get 80% of that. So divide your pound weight by 2.2, then multiply by .8.

So by those estimates, based on a weight of 155 lb, I should be eating 56 or 70 grams of protein per day. I manage to get over 70 some days, and I know I'm hitting 50 even on low days, so I figure I'm in a healthy enough range not to worry about it.

Just to throw a monkey wrench into those calculations, I've also heard that you should use your "ideal" weight instead of your current weight for these calculations. For someone like me trying to lose 5-10 pounds, that's close enough to be easy. For someone severely overweight trying to lose 100 lbs, they might end up undereating if they followed that recommendation. But maybe that's the point. (?)

--Fromper

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Tofu Nutrition Facts

Tofu is rich in high-quality protein. It is also a good source of B-vitamins and iron. When the curdling agent used to make tofu is calcium salt, the tofu is an excellent source of calcium. While 50 percent of the calories in tofu come from fat, a 4-ounce serving of tofu contains just 6 grams of fat. It is low in saturated fat and contains no cholesterol. Generally, the softer the tofu, the lower the fat content. Tofu is also very low in sodium, making it a perfect food for people on sodium-restricted diets.

50Kcals per 100g is nothing.

I believe that we need some fat in our diets and compared with other sources of vegetarian protein like nuts, seeds, cheese, egg
 
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