VeggieBoards banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2006iss...issue4poll.htm

Vegetarian Journal 2006 Issue 4

How Many Adults Are Vegetarian?

The Vegetarian Resource Group Asked in a 2006 National Poll

by Charles Stahler (Co-Director of VRG)

These days, almost everybody seems to have a daughter, a cousin, or a friend who is vegetarian. Even large corporations have become greatly interested in vegetarian and cruelty-free items. For example, Colgate recently purchased control of Toms of Maine for $100 million. Silk and its parent company White Wave were bought by Dean Foods, the largest U.S. processor of dairy foods.

Though a high number of Americans are interested in natural foods, how many adults are actually vegetarian? To find out this answer, The Vegetarian Resource Group posed the following question in a national poll conducted by Harris Interactive®.

Please tell us which of the following foods, if any, you never eat:

Meat

Poultry

Fish or Seafood

Dairy Products

Eggs

Honey

Because we use the word never and name the foods, The VRGs tallies will be different from those in other polls that simply ask if one is a vegetarian. Those polls are more dependent on personal definitions.

In this years poll, 2.3 percent of adults aged 18 years or older say they never eat meat, fish, or fowl and, thus, are vegetarian. Furthermore, 6.7 percent of the total say they never eat meat. . . .

http://www.vrg.org/journal/vj2006iss...issue4poll.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,262 Posts
Yeah, me too...ironically so many of the vegetarian products on the market are not suitable for vegans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Quote:
or example, Colgate recently purchased control of Tom's of Maine for $100 million. Silk and its parent company White Wave were bought by Dean Foods, the largest U.S. processor of dairy foods.
Ugh, that's depressing... I don't want to be supporting those companies when I buy Tom's of Maine or Silk. Time for a switch...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,134 Posts
What's with the 23% avoiding honey? I have some doubts about that statistic, since not many folks are allergic, and honey is a VERY common ingredient in foods. Perhaps folks don't know that they are consuming it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
I think a lot of people just thought, "Oh, I never have that." Most people don't read ingredients on their food (though I can't imagine doing that, now), so don't know that they're putting it in their body.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
I think that there are many problems with that survey--I doubt that high a percentage of people actually NEVER eat honey in cake or flapjacks or cereal, they would just not bother buying a jar of it cos theyre not really that fond. If you asked me if I ate honey I would probably say no (not as a moral thing, just dont like the taste that much) but have just checked and there was some in my cereal this morning.

Similarly the eggs thing, I suspect that lots of the people who said they dont eat eggs at least occasionally eat products that contain them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by KofiAnnonymous View Post

I see no reason for this. What does it accomplish?
Exactly. I see it as "eww... You are now selling cruelty free products? Well, I am not supprting you anymore." rather than. "Oh wow! You are selling creulty free products? Let's see if we can get more of your products like this by showing you support for having these options."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
I agree with kpickell. The statistical error alone in a poll of this many people is about 3%, the same size as the percentage of vegetarians it supposedly identifies. You would need a much larger sample to get an accurate measure of the size of the vegetarian population, and larger still to accurately determine how many are vegan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alli View Post

Ugh, that's depressing... I don't want to be supporting those companies when I buy Tom's of Maine or Silk. Time for a switch...
Same here. I feel foolish for not knowing where my dollars were going.

Bye bye, Silk soy milk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by veggiejanie View Post

Same here. I feel foolish for not knowing where my dollars were going.

Bye bye, Silk soy milk.
Y'all, this is some faulty logic here. Business responds to demand. Soup-rise, large companies respond to where they may be losing business! Companies such as these have the resources and capital to expand products like Silk or Tom's out of niche markets and into the mainstream. It might seem uncomfortable, but that's business/money for you.

Say vegans/vegs/whoever abstains from buying Silk/Tom's en masse. This tells the respective parent companies that buying socially responsible companies/selling socially responsible products will not be profitable and they won't bother going into those markets, and instead use their vast resources for all the lame things they usually sell. Products like natural toothpaste and Silk Nog (which everyone has to has to has to agree is pretty much the best ish ever) are relegated to obscurity. Average grocery store patrons won't get exposed to them, and the status quo is preserved.

But at least I didn't have to support a...a...a corporation! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,772 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seusomon View Post

I agree with kpickell. The statistical error alone in a poll of this many people is about 3%, the same size as the percentage of vegetarians it supposedly identifies. You would need a much larger sample to get an accurate measure of the size of the vegetarian population, and larger still to accurately determine how many are vegan.
Mind showing us how you arrived at 3%?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,090 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by KofiAnnonymous View Post

Y'all, this is some faulty logic here. Business responds to demand. Soup-rise, large companies respond to where they may be losing business! Companies such as these have the resources and capital to expand products like Silk or Tom's out of niche markets and into the mainstream. It might seem uncomfortable, but that's business/money for you.

Say vegans/vegs/whoever abstains from buying Silk/Tom's en masse. This tells the respective parent companies that buying socially responsible companies/selling socially responsible products will not be profitable and they won't bother going into those markets, and instead use their vast resources for all the lame things they usually sell. Products like natural toothpaste and Silk Nog (which everyone has to has to has to agree is pretty much the best ish ever) are relegated to obscurity. Average grocery store patrons won't get exposed to them, and the status quo is preserved.

But at least I didn't have to support a...a...a corporation! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
I've been saying this same thing for several years on this board, but it falls on deaf ears. Many vegans would simply prefer to buy from all vegan companies, even if that means veganism is pushed to the fringes of society and becomes less available to the mainstream people. Let's talk about a self-fulfilling prophecy here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,374 Posts
I think it's good for vegans to support all-vegan companies, but the key is not to withdraw support from vegan products simply because they are sold by non-vegan companies. While you may be adding to overall corporate profits, you are further stimulating demand for a product whose availability will continue to grow, making veganism easier for all. Until we reach a time when vegan consumers constitute a massive enough buying bloc to influence corporate decision-making, it is not all that effective to make every purchasing decision based on whether or not a company is entirely vegan. I would say that it's a good place to start, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Hmm.....this is a tricky issue. My base instinct is to support only veg*n companies, but, if the goal is to increase veg*nism as much as possible, then, it makes absolute sense to buy corporate so they see there is a demand for ethical products.

I think the goal should be to increase veg*nism as much as possible in the world's population, and thus we should support corporations that produce Silk or Morningstar Farms or something like that. Ends justify the means.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top