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I know most people on here (all?) went vegan for ethical reasons. I did too.
But the more I researched veganism the more I found it was the most logical thing for me to do! Apart from preventing animal cruelty, there was also the environmental benefits, the benefits to starving people in third world countries, the health benefits. I have a history of cancer on one side of the family, and heart disease on the other. By the time I went vegan I was wondering why I hadn't gone so much sooner?!

Which makes it so much harder to deal with omni's and vegetarians that eat fish


But I was wondering who looks at it from a logical standpoint, who has a more spiritual view?


Love being able to ask something like this and not get a subject change like in the real world
 

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I first became vegan for a spiritual purpose- to covenant with a God, who required veganism of me in order to continue our dialog; He simply didn't want to converse with a carnivore, and I was curious to hear what He had to say. In 20-years of veganism, I've learned a little of spirituality, but I've also come to understand the cold, dispassionate logic of it. I'm convinced more than ever of the compatibility between reason and faith. I recognize in myself both the illogical and the logical, and the necessity and value of each, which is not to say, I am perfectly balanced: I think I still lean in favor of the spiritual, right or wrong.
 

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I went vegan for animal reasons, too, but as I learned more about health and the environment, I realized it was the best choice for all. Sometimes now, I even forget about the animal welfare reasons (I've actually been making myself watch videos about industrial animal production to remind myself).
I love being vegan!
 

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I kinda agree with the estimable Capstan.

Vegan for logical reasons myself. But!

To whatever degree spirituality is not illogical then following any logical path must, kinda, also be following a spiritual path too?
 

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I started eating a vegan diet for health reasons. But as I learned about veganism, it didn't take long for other thinking to kick in and I started questioning my purchasing habits, my mindlessness, etc. I haven't gotten rid of my previously purchased leather shoes, but I did have to get rid of my old down comforter and replace it with a synthetic one. For whatever reason, sleeping under a blanket of feathers completely creeps me out. It's interesting because I used to absolutely love my comforter and that was the first emotional reaction I had when I really started thinking about what went into the animal products that I had purchased.

For the most part, I approach things from a pretty rational, logical standpoint with an occasional emotional response. There are non-animal alternatives to just about everything I buy. I occasionally miss the wider selection of products that were available to me when I didn't think too much about it. Now that I know better, it just feels very wrong to choose to buy anything that comes from an animal. I'm not sure I'd define it as a spiritual issue, I tend to think of it more as a moral issue.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggievamp View Post

I know most people on here (all?) went vegan for ethical reasons. I did too.
But the more I researched veganism the more I found it was the most logical thing for me to do! Apart from preventing animal cruelty, there was also the environmental benefits, the benefits to starving people in third world countries, the health benefits. I have a history of cancer on one side of the family, and heart disease on the other.
I first started to cut out dairy because I was trying to lose weight/ health reasons but I had an idea to go the whole way and go vegan. I researched it online and I realised that it was the ethical path to choose. I did get the idea to go vegan while I was doing a meditation ritual so I don't know if that would count as a spiritual motivation or maybe the clear part of my mind was directing me to the logical step from being a vegetarian to being a vegan.

There are a lot of sensible reasons to go vegan especially if people have any environmental concerns (which they should have!
) but I think it's mostly because being vegan feels right for me so maybe it is mostly an emotional response.
 

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I'm a logical person, but my veganism is at its heart an extension of my personal empathy and my ethical principles. I've believed and been taught since childhood not to be cruel to animals, and was always told to put myself in the place of people and animals who are suffering. Since I learned the true measure of what happens in factory farms, and when I put a dog or cat in the place of those animals mentally - or even myself - I decided I couldn't pay others to do that.

As for what some call spirituality, I consider it a form of mental poison, and I'm xVxPoison FreexVx.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clueless Git View Post

To whatever degree spirituality is not illogical then following any logical path must, kinda, also be following a spiritual path too?
To whatever degree sugary is tasty, then eating something tasty (such as vegan lasagna), must, kinda, be eating something sugary.
 

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I can talk about food-efficiency, environmentalism and health all day, but when it comes down to it it's because I care about the animals.
 

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emotional.
I was one of those
"i only eat chicken and seafood!" people for the longest time haha I was a moron.
finally came to my senses and committed to veganism.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is all very interesting! So nice to have a discussion like this.
I have a vegetarian friend (eats chicken and fish sometimes - "but only free range") and she always has a statistic about the declining environment, or animal cruelty, or human suffering. She's also quite involved in Buddhism. She's totally smart and well informed about everything, but she just won't go vegan, or even fully vegetarian!

Maybe it can be a secret new years resolution of mine to make her go vegan
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggievamp View Post

This is all very interesting! So nice to have a discussion like this.
I have a vegetarian friend (eats chicken and fish sometimes - "but only free range") and she always has a statistic about the declining environment, or animal cruelty, or human suffering. She's also quite involved in Buddhism. She's totally smart and well informed about everything, but she just won't go vegan, or even fully vegetarian!

Maybe it can be a secret new years resolution of mine to make her go vegan
have you pointed out to her that vegetarians don't eat animals?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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Originally Posted by zirpkatze View Post

have you pointed out to her that vegetarians don't eat animals?
Haha...yes many times...one of my omni friends even said "I think they call that a pescatarian" and she said no she was most definitely vegetarian she just ate chicken and fish...apparently she eats it if she's feeling a bit off to make sure she has the right nutrients and stuff
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I really have no idea...she's so well informed about everything I don't know why she doesn't commit...
one of our omni friends said she is making her a vegetarian cook book for christmas. she asked me to add some recipes but I really wasn't sure (I don't want to seem like the preachy vegan) but I think I might add a few vegan recipes to show her all the food you can eat to get what you need
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

To whatever degree sugary is tasty, then eating something tasty (such as vegan lasagna), must, kinda, be eating something sugary.
More for the sake of a quiet life than anything else ..

Kinda, yes.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by veggievamp View Post

I really have no idea...she's so well informed about everything I don't know why she doesn't commit...
one of our omni friends said she is making her a vegetarian cook book for christmas. she asked me to add some recipes but I really wasn't sure (I don't want to seem like the preachy vegan) but I think I might add a few vegan recipes to show her all the food you can eat to get what you need
For someone like her that's probably the best approach you can take, just be the example and get her to eat great vegan food.

Over 20 years ago I went ovo-lacto veg to eat more healthy. As the years went by as I learned more about the good food I ate vegan more and more to the point I was practically vegan...maybe 95%. It seemed the logical thing to do to commit to a 30 day challenge that they were having here at veggie boards, and after about 10 stays I stayed with it. That was over two years ago. Naturally by nearly 18 years of eating and knowing about veganism nothing any vegan said or did could make me convert, on the contrary it made me belligerent. I vividly remember a conversation here with a guy on these very forums that he just couldn't understand why I wouldn't take the next step. It baffled him and he was belittling without really meaning to be and it just made me think "why would I want to be like him and others like him?"

Today all I really to do promote veganism is to "be the change I want others to be". It makes perfect logically sense to be vegan to me, but I can't get inside another's head not matter how I try and enter their logic. It has to come from within them.

All that said, what really threw me over the edge into veganism was the enlightenment of the cruelty of animal agriculture. I've gone vegan in both diet and lifestyle trying to eliminate products in clothing, shoes, etc. that harm animals. It's enough to keep myself in line.
 

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For me veganism is just part of my moral code, just one of the many things I do because I believe it would be wrong to do otherwise. I don't see veganism as something that defines me anymore than not stealing or hurting others - although it has a bigger impact on my life because it's not the norm.

Veganism isn't about spirituality, health, a boycott, or making a stand for me. It's just that I believe exploiting animals is wrong, so I try not to do it. I guess it is about emotion in as much as I think we use emotion to evaluate morality, and right and wrongs - but I see it as a tool, along with logical reasoning, experience and a lot of other things, to enable me to make the right choices.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clueless Git View Post

More for the sake of a quiet life than anything else ..

Kinda, yes.
If by 'kinda' we mean 'not at all true; a clear logical fallacy' then sure.
 
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