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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started a vegetable garden last year, but didn't get it ready quick enough to grow anything other than herbs. I'm proud to say, it is a pretty nice garden now with broccoli, cauliflower, kale, spinach, lettuce, chard, arugula, endive, tomato, pumpkin, strawberries, yellow and butternut squash, zucchini, artichoke, eggplant, pepper, lettuce, okra, AND multiple types of herbs!


However... A very voracious groundhog lives not too far from my garden, and many deer pass through our yard, too, on top of that- there are bugs, squirrels, and chipmunks.
I put up a fence, the groundhog still managed to get in, so I put rocks all along the bottom of it, and now there were two deer in there!

I'm fine with them eating the apples from our tree- but I really really want to be able to have local and organic food since my parents won't pay for a CSA


Any tips on how to keep all of them away- naturally??
 

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How about building some sort of wire mesh top for the garden?

We have had our garden demolished by some sort of gopher type thing that dug underground and popped up inside the fence. The only solution for that is the dig down and bury fencing underground.
 

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It's not pretty, but build wire cages. Here is a blog with a photo of cages on square foot garden beds.
http://greenapple2012.wordpress.com/...07/wire-cages/

If you have raised beds with walls, you can line the bottom of the beds with gopher-proof mesh. That prevents burrowing animals from tunneling up into a caged garden. Then you basically have an enclosed cube of wire mesh that prevents animals from entering from any of the 6 sides.

Then you just have to worry about insects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the help!
I have thought about putting mesh over it, but I'm using sticks for some of the posts to hold up the fence around it, so it isn't very stable.
I have some old rabbit cages over some plants, but not enough for them all. I probably will use extra fencing to make little cages for the rest of them.

I have some epslom salt, so I'll use that. I also have lavender and citronella, but I was hoping to put those in a specific herb garden.

I also heard that human hair keeps away groundhogs?? Maybe it's time for a haircut..
 

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Since I grow hot peppers and some very aromatic herbs, I try to place them around the rest of the garden. Most of the animals in the area, such as deer and rabbits don't seem to like them. Fences certainly work, but if you have deer, you need some VERY tall fences to make a difference. While they are expensive at almost $50 a piece, we found something called the "Scarecrow", which seems to work for our entire garden area. We have a couple, since the garden is huge, but the deer haven't even touched things like our hosta, which is a favorite of theirs. Our backyard goes straight into a forest and I see 10+ deer in packs around our house daily. We also have rabbits, groundhogs and just about everything else. Before we did this, practically everything that wasn't protected (hosta for example) was annihilated.
Here is a link to the scarecrow on Amazon. We would have had to spend far more on fencing to accomplish this for our situation.
 

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From experience, I've found barriers to be the only things that work. Never found scare tactics or irritating substances or plants to be at all useful. However animals work tirelessly at it and are amazingly clever about finding ways through your barriers. You have to work longer, and harder. Us humans are smarter, but only a little smarter, so it is hard to keep the non-human animals out. Humans that want to get in, are even harder to keep out.

You can keep out deer with 2 meter high polypropylene mesh. The trick is use strong posts to string it across, and angling the posts ( and mesh) so that the tops are more outward than the bottoms. This makes it harder for the deer to get leverage, when using their heads to push the fence and posts over. Bury the posts 1/2 meter deep. So they need to be 2 1/2 meters long. Concrete is unnecessary. Just remember - angle out. Brush only the bottom, buried part of the posts, plus an extra few centimeters, with anti-rot treatment. 1 inch by 1 inch (nominal inch) by 7.5 foot posts.
 
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