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For all of you vegans out there, I have some questions:<br><br>
How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?<br><br>
What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?<br><br>
Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible <i>and</i> be vegan at the same time?<br><br>
When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and <i>how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?</i><br><br>
Thanks so much.
 

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I thought about the 'difficulty' I would be contributing to for the cows, calves, chickens and chicks if I continued to drink milk or eat eggs, and that outweighed the inconvenience to others. I did worry a bit about inconveniencing my omni bf, but it was a choice I had to make, after knowing what I knew. I have tried to 'be flexible' though, in the sense of, I will go to restaurants where he can eat meat dishes as long as there is at least some option for me (be it nachos and salsa, chips and salad, cheeseless pizza, I like all these things so I don't mind) for his part he'll go out of his way to get me vegan chocolate and cake and when we go to a BBQ he makes sure my stuff is kept separate or cooked first.
 

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<i>How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?</i><br><br>
I live in BFE so I either take food with me or eat at home. I either don't have or don't trust the alternatives.<br><br><i>What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?</i><br><br>
I have very little patience for idiots. My least rude response is telling them to mind their own business. You probably would not consider my standard responses to be mature. (I was nice initially, but after the first few years I gave that up).<br><br><i>Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?</i><br><br>
I'm inflexible about veganism the same way I'm inflexible about rape, child abuse, etc. It's a horrific injustice that I don't partake in, not something to be flexible about.<br><br><i>When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?</i><br><br>
Neither of those is relevant. The issue was how much worse life would be for the guys being enslaved, abused, murdered, and eaten if I <i>didn't</i> go vegan. Me and the folks around me being <i>inconvenienced</i> is nothing in comparison to that.
 

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I rarely go out to eat, when I do it's to friends houses who cater for me (us) or it's bbqs and I get super annoyed that all my veggie food gets eaten first, by everybody!<br>
I have never met anyone who "can't believe I am vegan" I usually get a few questions and that is about it.<br>
I am very flexible with veganism, I will eat anything without animal bits in it.<br>
I did consider the difficulties for myself but considered it worth it. I don't see how it is difficult for others. I find they try and make it difficult at times. I am quite happy to not eat, or eat something small if the situation arises, where as they will make a bigger fuss about it. That is their problem, not mine.
 

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I have a very different take from that in the previous response.<br><br><b>How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?</b><br><br>
This is very difficult. It's always tough being invited over to friends places or always having to refuse. For example, some friends and I were walking through a park for like 2 hours and all of the sudden there was an ice cream stand, and everyone had ice cream and I was left emptyhanded.<br><br>
It's not that I even want ice cream per se, just that I would like to have something and not feel separated from other people, you know? You kind of get used to it, though. By far the most difficult thing for me about being vegan is not the food (vegan food is all you really need to have tasty, perfectly healthy food) but rather the social concerns (and travel).<br><br><br><b>What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?</b><br><br>
Why couldn't they believe it? The normal way I explain it is that I was already vegetarian for various reasons, mostly animal suffering but also environmental. And then I say I started thinking more and more about animal suffering and realized that death is not really the worst thing for animals, but continual mistreatment and poor living conditions. I like to think of it as death-penalty vs. life-imprisonment without parole, and to me they are both really bad, sometimes I think life-imprisonment is even worse. So that led me from not eating meat to eating no animal products, which is being vegan. It's not really so complicated.<br><br><br><b>Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?</b><br><br>
I fully sympathize with you. For the first few years, I was totally inflexible, but now that I am travelling more, I see the need to be more flexible. Especially when even the vegetarian options you can't be sure are totally vegan. Also social situations can be very pressing on your mind.<br><br>
So I was thinking recently, say I eat 2 meals per day, 365 days a year, that's over 700 meals per year. If I take 1% of that, that is 7 meals. Let's take less: 5 meals. So if I eat 5 vegetarian meals per year, then I am over 99% vegan, and of course the vegetarian meals I would choose to eat for social or traveling purposes would be very minimally vegetarian, not like a block of cheese with ice cream, but like you know, either whatever it prepared that is vegetarian or something that may have vegetarian but non-vegan ingredients simply in there, but not being the primary focus.<br><br>
I am seriously thinking about doing this because it is probably only on 5 occasions per year that I really feel like it's too much. Hopefully what will happen is that I decide to do this, and end up never using any of the 5 opportunities at all! That way I can tell myself that I can always use these opportunities if I need them (which is true, my life is a choice, not some moralistic punishment), so that I have fewer worries, but then my behavior will be just as vegan as before.<br><br><br><b>When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?</b><br><br>
Well, I like to say there are two kinds or rather aspects of vegans: inner vegans and outer vegans. Inner vegans are those people who are convinced that eating animal products in not the justifiable or compassionate thing to do. It is a conviction. An outer vegan (not necessarily a different person) is someone who abstains from consuming all animal products.<br><br>
Of the two, being an inner vegan, really being convinced in your heart and mind that you want to promote the welfare of all sentient beings (humans not excluded), is more fundamental and maybe even in some sense more important. Because that is your motivation, your intention, your understanding, and your view that is the basis of action.<br><br>
Now the thing is, if you are an inner vegan -- an "intellectual" vegan -- but not an outer vegan, that is very difficult! I meet people like this, well more so inner vegetarians who are not outer vegetarians. That's difficult because they always have this guilt to carry around. You can see, everytime they meet a vegetarian or vegan person, they feel guilty, maybe even offended or jealous, because they know it's right but they have not implemented their own beliefs.<br><br>
So actually I would turn your question around: I think it is harder, once you are convinced that it is right, to not do it! People say it is difficult, and of course it is nearly impossible if you don't *believe* in it. But if you believe in it, it is easier!<br><br>
Re: people around me, well it's mostly not so difficult for them, but you can ease that by presenting your case is a reasonable, open, sympathetic, non-judgmental way, and they also tend to get used to it and sometimes even like it. But in those cases where it is really difficult for them, perhaps you would have to think of something for that particular case or person.
 
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