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For all of you vegans out there, I have some questions:

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?

What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?

Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?

Thanks so much.
 

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How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing? I eat fruits and vegetables. If none of that is provided or availalbe, I eat beforehand or bring food. Easy!

What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it? So their response is "this is unbelieveable?" I'd say, "Believe it and ask me in 10 years."


Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time? Do yoga.
Veganism is about not causing harm intentionally to animals. I see no reason to be flexible and cause harm to another being unnecessarily. Doesn't seem like a good life goal or achievement for me.

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
Not really. I considered the non-humans animals more than anything. Found going vegan easy, esp. eating whole foods.
 

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Going vegan was a pretty huge change for me because it also involves changing my family. But all I have to do is watch a five minute video documenting animal cruelty in factory farming and then its super easy to be vegan all day long every day. Id rather not eat at all than eat an animal that suffers.
Another way to look at it is not how you are limited and what you can't do but more look at the doors it opens up for you to have such a great purpose with your life and how much longer you will live.
I also envision myself as not the one being inflexible. Most others are seemingly inflexible to me now for their unwillingness to learn that you don't actually have to sacrifice another life to survive. Eating meat is an option, not a necessity.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?
Thesedays I go to vegan restaurants, it solves the problem, but back in the days when this was an issue, I'd just refuse ice-cream when I was at their place and bring up the subject of how you could make vegan ice-cream. Some of my friends were interested in making it.


I also started to invite friends and family over to my place to eat instead so that either myself or my BF could be in charge of the cooking.

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Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life.
It is good to generally be flexible in life, but not with your morals or ethical principles. They usually have to be fairly solid or they don't mean a thing. Saying "it's good to be flexible" to a vegan is like saying "it's good to be flexible about the holocaust" to most other people. :/
 

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Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?
If I'm going over to someone's house, I'll offer to bring something. I've found a lot of times people actually want to make something special for me, which is awesome! If it's a restaurant, I'll check what might be modified off the menu, or perhaps try to arrange something in advance. Some ice cream places will offer soy ice cream or sorbet. Otherwise, I would probably get a slushie or just a root beer.

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What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?
I haven't had a problem with this, but if they were being rude, I would not discuss it with them. You're not really going to get anywhere with someone who is confrontational anyway, so why try? If someone is just curious, I'll talk about my reasons for not eating animal products (animal death and cruelty), but not if we're sitting at the dinner table of course.

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Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?
Ways to be flexible: Don't expect everyone to accommodate you, don't be too picky about what you eat (as long as it's vegan, unless there is some medical necessity), offer to bring food, have a backup plan (clif bar in a purse or pocket), etc. You can still be flexible on non-food related things. And being flexible isn't necessarily a virtue in itself -- you shouldn't do things that go against your ethical sensibilities just for the sake of being flexible.

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When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
Yes, this was a huge concern, and I considering staying lacto-ovo vegetarian when out with friends and family because of it. Then I realized it wasn't really that big of a deal -- people have all sorts of different dietary needs, and people already made an extra effort to accommodate me as a lacto-ovo vegetarian. It's not really more effort to put out a bowl of salsa to go with the tortilla chips rather than cheese dip, for example. Vegan food doesn't have to be anything fancy. I don't expect people to make an extra effort, but it certainly is nice when they do.
 

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How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?

I can usually find something vegan at nearly every restaurant, with the possible exception of those "all-American" chains - where you can still probably get a plain baked potato and a salad with oil and vinegar (but that's kind of dull). Stick with ethnic restaurants and you'll have better success. As for going out for ice cream, many sorbets are dairy free, so call ahead and ask. Or order coffee or a soda instead of ice cream.

What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?

Tell them you've given it a lot of thought and it's something you feel compelled to do now that you know what really happens to animals in the food chain. Tell them to watch "Earthlings" or "Meet your Meat" and then you'll be happy to discuss your choice. I've only had one bad experience in the 6 years I've been vegan, so it's not something that occurs frequently, in my experience.

Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?

Veganism comes with a wonderful sense of purpose and freedom from guilt. It's enormously flexible once you get used to it - and you come to realize that it's not so much the "food" that matters, in social settings, but the company.

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?

Yes, and that's the hardest part. I always tell people not to try to cook for me, that I will bring something to share. Or I invite them to my house - I'm a great cook and people are amazed. Or we go out. I've found, over the years, that people know to provide hummus and a veggie tray for me
and I'm fine with that - I appreciate the effort!

Best of Luck!
 

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Oh, imagined something a bit naughty when I saw this thread title...*blush*
 

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How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?
If someone invites me for dessert or something, chances are that they like me enough not to force me to eat something they know I'm against. I've had ice cream with friends before where I just had a waffle cone filled with chopped fruit. As others have said, it's a good idea when visiting someone to bring a dish. At the very least you'll have something vegan and you'll have something yummy to share.

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What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?
As for people confronting me about it....You'll see all kinds. Some people will be genuinely interested, others might be trying to get a rise out of you. Whatever happens, try to keep your calm. Be reasonable and know both your beliefs and your information. If they insist on turning it into an argument, just walk away. You can't reason with everyone and getting all worked up over it just isn't worth it.

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Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?
Sure, being flexible is important, but you should never have to compromise on your beliefs. There are plenty of ways to be flexible when it comes to food without giving up your veganism and most dishes can be made vegan with a little extra effort: think cake, pizza, etc. I don't think a lot of non-veg*ns realize this, and the quickest way to show them is to share.

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When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
I gave a ton of thought to the last part of that question. When I made the decision to go vegetarian and then later vegan, I was the only one in my house that wanted to. Our family is on a very tight budget, and I was worried that having to buy separate food and fix separate meals would be a strain. It really wasn't as bad as I had expected it to be. I was able to make vegan slow-cooker meals that were both cheap and filling, and the extra portions left over eventually brought my brother over to the veg side.

Eating out worried me too. I have never been the one to choose where we go to eat, but at the same time, I've never gone hungry at a restaurant. Here's a secret about restaurants: They want to feed you so that you'll pay them. Usually, they'll find a way to fix something for me, even if it's just whipping together some rice and vegetables for a small stir fry or bringing me pasta without meat-sauce. The key is to be polite and ask lots of questions. Chances are most places will be able to do something.

When it comes to eating with other people, I always, always offer to bring a dish or two. You really can't go wrong with that. I don't expect people to bend over backwards for me, and this way I know that what I'm eating is vegan. It's also yet another chance to share and show people how good vegan food can be. :3
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?
I tell them that I'm vegan and I don't eat ice-cream.

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Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?
That entirely depends upon how they say what they have to say.

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Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
I realized that it would be difficult at times, but it wasn't enough to stop me.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?

Thanks so much.
No, didn't care about anything but doing right by animals. I couldn't have cared less about how much more difficult life might have been, if I'd even thought that far ahead, and as a matter of fact, it isn't at all difficult.

As far as other people, I don't make difficulties for them. Any difficulty they perceive as caused by me is their problem, and they can go stuff themselves in the bottom layer of a stack of battery cages if they think their lives are hard.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by penny79 View Post

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing? I eat fruits and vegetables. If none of that is provided or availalbe, I eat beforehand or bring food. Easy!

What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it? So their response is "this is unbelieveable?" I'd say, "Believe it and ask me in 10 years."


Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time? Do yoga.
Veganism is about not causing harm intentionally to animals. I see no reason to be flexible and cause harm to another being unnecessarily. Doesn't seem like a good life goal or achievement for me.

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
Not really. I considered the non-humans animals more than anything. Found going vegan easy, esp. eating whole foods.
I can't imagine a better response to your post that this. Penny rocks.

On being flexible I would only add: the omnivores inviting / joining me to/for dinner etc. need to be a little flexible. All my non-vegan family members go out of their way to make at least a dish or two that I can eat. It's not asking too much.
 

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Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?
I wonder how flexible this same person would be if you chose to question their moral beliefs, for example, say they were staunchly pro-life. I wonder how they would feel if you told them it was good to be flexible about that.

You don't have to be flexible about your morals and values, ever. You have a right to have strong beliefs about meat just as much as someone else does about abortion or politics. Omni's don't get to choose what is important to you, and what it is okay to be flexible about.
 

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Originally Posted by Sevenseas View Post

How do vegans do it? With great relish.
And hot sauce and mustard and pesto...condiments are of the UTMOST importance.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?
I just make sure people know I'm vegan beforehand and then I make a plan. So for example, I use a vegan food finder app on my phone to find vegan options at chain restaurants. And I know how to read a menu to figure out what they have in the kitchen and then ask for something special. Or I'll bring a clif bar with me. My husband likes to just wing it and deal with the consequences. Sometimes he winds up picking cheese off a salad but that's OK with him and some omnis seem to think that makes him seem less strict and more "flexible." Other times he just announces to a food server "I'm vegan! Do you have any food for me?" It's kind of funny. Either method works and it's totally up to you.

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What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?
If they're outright rude/mean about it then I usually just walk away. But if they're playfully joking or have serious questions then I just try to stay calm, present the issue in a way that I think will make sense to them, use humor, and when necessary change the subject. I also tend to have some Vegan Outreach pamphlets nearby most of the time so usually I can give someone one of those if they seem interested.
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Someone once told me that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?]
Being vegan isn't about deprivation or strict rules; it's about avoiding animal products as much as possible and practical. It's about taking a stand for compassion, mercy, justice, peace. You don't need to "be flexible" in your support of compassion. You just need to act compassionately. You'll find for yourself where that line is drawn. For many of us, your veganism will be flexible enough that it won't interfere with (m)any of your current everyday activities (unless you're a fisherman or something).

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When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
It took me two tries to go vegan. Once in middle school that lasted a year until I finally caved. At the time I didn't have much support.
I tried again many years later with more support from my husband. We went vegan together. It wasn't hard. We knew what to do. We're smart and resourceful. Some people reacted a little strangely and you could tell they felt like we were making things difficult for them, but those people have come around. They are comfortable with it now. They just needed to learn where we drew the lines and that we weren't going to stop being their friends/family as a result of going vegan.

Most times you change yourself or your life it seems hard at first. A new exercise routine, a new job, a new relationship (after the initial 'honeymoon period'), children, moving to a new place, etc... they all seem difficult. But after a while you get used to it and it's not so difficult anymore. It's the same with being vegan. It gets easier with practice
 

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For all of you vegans out there, I have some questions:

How do you deal with going out to eat, e.g. with friends, for ice-cream, over at somebody's house, that sort of thing?
I only have one friend who lives in the same city as I do, and she's also a vegan. My boyfriend eats vegan food. My relatives are kind enough to make sure I always have something to eat when we have family gatherings.

What could be a mature response to someone who cannot believe that you're vegan, and who confronts you about it?
I don't know. I've never had this reaction. I suppose you could ask them why it bothers them so much.

Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?
I disagree with that advice. It's good to be flexible regarding some things, but not others. Veganism and your values are two things you shouldn't be flexible about.

When you went vegan, did you consider how much more difficult life would be like for you, and how much more difficult it would be for the people around you?
I don't think my life as a vegan is difficult. The hardest part is dealing with a$$holes, and I'm very adept at that.
I don't care that it's "difficult" for the people around me. They can go cry in a corner for all I care. If they think they have it tough because I'm a vegan, they need to watch some factory farm footage.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life. But how can you be flexible and be vegan at the same time?
"Moderation in all things, including moderation."

You could say that you are flexible in some things. That even though you are committed to being a vegan, you're a little more flexible when it comes to buying organic, or buying fair trade, or recycling, or whatever. No body is perfect, and we all choose the things we want to spend time on.
 

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Originally Posted by Woofie View Post

Someone once told me (because I'm a vegetarian who's seriously considering veganism) that it's good to be flexible in life.
As others have stated, flexibility is great in some things. In ethics and morality not so much. I'm not flexible about rape for example - it's always a bad thing. I'm not flexible about child molestation - it's always a bad thing. I'm not flexible about murder, entrapment, slavery and torment of any creature (human or non-human) to satisfy my personal greed and tastebuds.

Flexibility is great. My ethics and morals are not flexible.
 
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