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I want to start horse riding lessons soon, and hopefully one day I can get my own horse. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I'm just wondering, if I full board my horse at a stable and they provide feed, turn out, grooming and vet and farrier (at extra cost), what responsibilities do I still have? How many times a week do they have to be ridden? There is a place near me that gives you the option of leasing the horse to them for lessons, and they reduce the cost of your boarding, plus your horse gets exercised. Also, is it still possible for me to become a good rider at age 16? Most people have been riding all their lives!<br><br>
Any other info would be appreciated too!<br><br>
Thanks! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/broccoli.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":bobo:"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/carrot.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":vebo:">
 

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Don't worry, you can become a good rider at any age! However, I would not reccomend buying a horse untill you have been riding for awhile and feel confident. I would begin ridng lessons and then lease a horse and then possibly buy a horse. There is no real number of days a horse needs to be ridden a week or anything, some horses need to be worked everyday otherwise they are nuts, others you can op on after a onth or two and it is like you rode them yesterday.<br><br>
What is important is that your horse is well conditioned or in shape for the riding that you plan to do. I would normally ride my horse 4-5 times a week but I am away at college so she has to deal with only 3 times a week, fri, sat, sun. It also depends on if your horse is turned out. If your horse is kept in a stall 24-7 then you sure as hell beter be out there everyday doing somthing with him/her.<br><br>
As for boarding n stuff, the other responsibilities you will have is everything, this is your horse! optimally you should be checking on your horse everyday to see if they might have injred themselves, or to groom them, or just bond.<br><br>
OAND I would not lease out your horse, lesson kids are a real good way to screw up your horse. that would be m opinion though, it would save you money...<br><br>
Feel free to ask other questions!
 

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^ It really depends on the barn/program... some places take great care of your horse in a part-lease, others make your life into a living hell. If you do get into that situation, be very sure to establish your boundaries- what days they can use him, what they should do if there's a problem, etc. Ideally, maintenance is riding 3-4 days a week, more than that and you will be improving your horse and his fitness. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> 5-6 days a week, in the perfect world. If he's turned out in the daytime/all the time, he'll be much happier if he can't be ridden regularily. If he's in all the time, on his day off you should definitely still groom and walk/longe him. If possible, go out and see him every day (or close to every day) to groom, check up on him, etc even if you don't have time to ride.<br><br><br><br>
And you can definitely learn to ride when you're older! Some of the better riders I know didn't start until their mid-teens. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Let me know if there's anything else I can help you with!
 

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I too would not recommend buying a horse...If you are going to hand over the responsibilities such as feeding, getting the farrier etc and just ride it then why not just get lessons a couple of times a week? It would probably be cheaper. But if you did buy a horse I would make sure it's not kept at a place where they are stabled all or even most of the time...I think it is extremely cruel to keep horses stabled and couldnt imagine my beautiful horse being cooped up in a little stall!<br><br>
Btw you will love riding! and never too old to learn!!
 

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Leasing can be a good way to break into the whole "horse ownership" thing. You get to learn about the additional expenses and emergencies that you may not have budgeted for and you still have the option of riding and caring for your horse.<br><br><br><br>
It's also a great option for higher-priced show horses where you are part owner or something.<br><br><br><br>
Be sure you're VERY familier with the policies of the stable you'l be working with. I would definitely recommend taking lessons there for several months (at a minimum) before jumping into a lease...<br><br><br><br>
Horse ownership can be very expensive - make sure you're prepard for the prices of tack, feed, vet bills, worming, shots, etc., etc...<br><br><br><br>
Are you planning to show? game? trail ride? just hang around the pasture riding bareback? Know exactly what you want before you jump in - but regardless - you'll enjoy it I'm sure!! And you're never too young to learn.<br><br><br><br>
I started riding at 14 and I'm now (WELL) over 40 and I still exercise my trainer's horses, show on the rare occassion, give lessons and train yearlings - it's definitely a passion you never outgrow...
 

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I am in agreement with everyone else. Lease first if you can than buy. Cost is very expensive. I would avoid allowing the horse used for lessons, so long as you are riding him/her several times weekly. Lesson horses have a tendency to get ridden into the ground and devolop bad habits from carrying students all the time, JMHO. Don't worry your not too old to learn to ride. Although I was on a horse before I could walk, I have trained many an older rider with great success. I wish you the best in your new sport.
 

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First off, yes it is possible to become a good rider if you start at 16, but, as at any age, only if you really work at it. Unless you get lucky at the stables you are learning at though, you are fairly likely to start your lessons in a group with loads of young children as more people take up the sport at that age than later in life.<br><br>
IF you enjoy your lessons and still want a horse, I would ask why. As a beginner (and I doubt you would make it out of my "beginner" category until you have been riding regularly for AT LEAST 3 years) you are likely to lack the riding skills to deal with any problems which may occur with the horse's work. Even the nicest of horses will notice weaknesses in your riding and is fairly likely to take advantage of them, meaning that there is a fair chance you will end up getting someone else to "fix" it for you and defeating the point of owning the horse yourself. Whilst it may seem like it would be good for your riding to have the horse available every day to practice on, with a beginner this situation can often ruin the horse and put off the rider and you will realistically be better off getting experience through riding lessons of working with lots of different horses of different personality types until you have sufficient experience to improve the horse you take on as owner rather than just trying to "cope" with it.<br><br>
The other reason people take on the responsibility of horse ownership is that they want to learn about horse care as well as riding, or would like to develop a strong bond with one horse. If you go ahead with your full livery arangement, you would not achieve either of these objectives either as you would only ever see your horse from its back, and so the situation would be no different for you than if you had regular lessons on the same riding school horse, except that if you own the horse you are likely to be paying a great deal more for the privilege.<br><br>
This is not to say that absolutely you shouldnt have a horse, or shouldnt keep it on full livery, but it doesnt seem to me like your proposed situation would fulfill any of the obvious objectives of horse ownership so think carefully about whether there is a reason for you to buy a horse before you go ahead and do it because "all riders have horses".<br><br><br><br>
Full livery on the terms you stated seems very comprehensive. You may be asked to make decisions about your horses feed / turnout time etc. (although full liveries frequently have those decisions taken out of their hands by the stables). Aside from that you would be responsible for buying the horse, paying the bills, and selling the horse if the time comes. Sounds to me like everything else would be done for you except exercising it. If you did decide to go ahead in this situation, the part lease sounds like a good option for your horse because it would ensure it got semi-regular exercise. Many experienced riders do not like to part lease their horses because you have little control who rides them and beginners can let them develop bad habits, but as you are a beginner yourself your horse would need to be of a sensible beginner carrying type, and a variety of riders using him under the supervision of an instructor might help to stop him developing faults specific to flaws in your riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>queenarmadillo</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
First off, yes it is possible to become a good rider if you start at 16, but, as at any age, only if you really work at it. Unless you get lucky at the stables you are learning at though, you are fairly likely to start your lessons in a group with loads of young children as more people take up the sport at that age than later in life.<br><br>
IF you enjoy your lessons and still want a horse, I would ask why. As a beginner (and I doubt you would make it out of my "beginner" category until you have been riding regularly for AT LEAST 3 years) you are likely to lack the riding skills to deal with any problems which may occur with the horse's work. Even the nicest of horses will notice weaknesses in your riding and is fairly likely to take advantage of them, meaning that there is a fair chance you will end up getting someone else to "fix" it for you and defeating the point of owning the horse yourself. Whilst it may seem like it would be good for your riding to have the horse available every day to practice on, with a beginner this situation can often ruin the horse and put off the rider and you will realistically be better off getting experience through riding lessons of working with lots of different horses of different personality types until you have sufficient experience to improve the horse you take on as owner rather than just trying to "cope" with it.<br><br>
The other reason people take on the responsibility of horse ownership is that they want to learn about horse care as well as riding, or would like to develop a strong bond with one horse. If you go ahead with your full livery arangement, you would not achieve either of these objectives either as you would only ever see your horse from its back, and so the situation would be no different for you than if you had regular lessons on the same riding school horse, except that if you own the horse you are likely to be paying a great deal more for the privilege.<br><br>
This is not to say that absolutely you shouldnt have a horse, or shouldnt keep it on full livery, but it doesnt seem to me like your proposed situation would fulfill any of the obvious objectives of horse ownership so think carefully about whether there is a reason for you to buy a horse before you go ahead and do it because "all riders have horses".<br><br><br><br>
Full livery on the terms you stated seems very comprehensive. You may be asked to make decisions about your horses feed / turnout time etc. (although full liveries frequently have those decisions taken out of their hands by the stables). Aside from that you would be responsible for buying the horse, paying the bills, and selling the horse if the time comes. Sounds to me like everything else would be done for you except exercising it. If you did decide to go ahead in this situation, the part lease sounds like a good option for your horse because it would ensure it got semi-regular exercise. Many experienced riders do not like to part lease their horses because you have little control who rides them and beginners can let them develop bad habits, but as you are a beginner yourself your horse would need to be of a sensible beginner carrying type, and a variety of riders using him under the supervision of an instructor might help to stop him developing faults specific to flaws in your riding.</div>
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Thanks to everyone who answered!<br><br>
Queenarmadillo, I understand what you are saying and fully agree!<br><br>
My goal is to become the best rider I can be, and only then will I even consider leasing or buying a horse. I realise what a huge responsibility it is and I don't feel ready for it yet, although its been my dream to have my own horse for years.<br><br>
Today I went for a drive with my friend to look at some potential stables where I want to take lessons, and we found a great place. I'm very excited about it, and if all goes well I'll start in October. The trainers are friendly, the horses look good, and the place is very welcoming.<br><br>
Next week I'm going for a long guided trail ride, so I'm very excited about that.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for all your advice and help everyone!
 
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