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My rabbits 2 and a half years old, and is a house bunny. When he was young he used to grunt and run around us, chew everything in sight and spray but when we got him neutured he was fine after that and never displayed this behaviour again...untill now (!) suddenly he's grunting, running around us, chewing everything and he's also acting pretty agressive as far as a rabbit can, considering he's normally the most docile bunny in the world.<br><br><br><br>
I wondered if anyone knows what's got into him? and what we can do about it? My mum thought it could be because it was spring, but he didnt do this last spring?<br><br><br><br>
Any ideas? If he keeps chewing mum's going to have to restrict the room he has (right now he's got a pretty much free range) and he seems kinda unhappy and agressive too?<br><br><br><br>
Any info is fab! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> thanks
 

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Ummm...He may have gotten neutered at too old of an age to permanently change his behavior. Rabbits reach sexual maturity at around 6 months of age, so he may still display such behavior.<br><br><br><br>
My sister raises rabbits and is pretty much a walking encyclopedia on such topics so I'll tell you what she told me:<br><br><br><br>
Your rabbit doesn't seem like he is in pain or anything, he seems like he's feeling good. Rabbits run and grunt and chew when they are happy. If he was in pain or angry about something he would bite and kick and not let anyone touch him. If that's the case you may need to take him to the vet to make sure he doesn't have any health problems.<br><br>
Naturally, rabbits chew everything! Their teeth grow at an incredible rate so they need to chew on hard objects to wear them down. They also have a very fast metabolism and need to eat all the time. So chewing isn't a behavior problem. What you need to do is divert him away from the objects you don't want him to chew and give him something else like wood blocks, some cat toys, etc. Items that you don't want him to chew either remove or make unpleasant for them to chew. For example, wires need to be wrapped, and chair legs can be wrapped in rubber.<br><br><br><br>
Do NOT limit his space. This will only cause more problems. He is so used to running around free-range that putting him in a tiny cage will cause distress.<br><br><br><br>
Another cause of his hyperactivity could be the smell of other rabbits. An open window or door could carry the scent of another rabbit indoors.<br><br><br><br>
I think that's all for now. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ooh thank you that was helpful. We got him neutered pretty young...about as soon as you can without it being dangerous actually though.<br><br><br><br>
We aren't planning on caging him up! Don't worry, but my mum is currently only giving him a room to play in for about half the day because she gets upset about her furniture (...we had a big argument about this) getting chewed.<br><br><br><br>
Since it's been sunnier the windows have been open so it might be that, my mum is buying some more toys this weekend to try to occupy him and has been giving him lots of boxes [man he loves boxes] so hopefully that'll help.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> thanks for the info, hopefully it'll blow over.
 

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we got our october j neutered very late--well after he knew what sex was. lol<br><br><br><br>
after neutering him, he only became sexually assertive when i was menstruating or fertile (ovulating). and even then, it was mild in comparison to pre-neuter times.<br><br><br><br>
but then last november, he became as aggressive as he was before he was neutered. it was quite shocking. and, his genital area would swell up and be dry and painful--there's a topical ointment that we use when that happens.<br><br><br><br>
about 8 weeks after it started, it slowed down considerably. he still sprays me a lot, and is sexually aggressive--but not as bad has he was from nov-jan.<br><br><br><br>
he has no other health problems and seems very happy, so we're just not going to worry about it. they suggested taking him to a behavoiral specialist, but i just decided that wasn't necessary. besides, when i called her and told her the age of my rabbit, she said "they don't live that long, you must have the age wrong!" except that he's lived with me for nearly 10 years (it'll be 10 in may)--so i can't be wrong about it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
so, there ya go (he was neutered around age 4-5; and he's just about 10 now). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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10 is old for a rabbit, but it isn't unheard of. My sister's last pair of bunnies were both around 10 years old when they died.<br><br><br><br>
Back to the original topic, those two bunnies were neutered as soon as they were old enough (around 4-5 months old, I think). Oddly, once they got older, they still tried to have sex with each other. Even more oddly, it was usually the female who mounted the male.<br><br><br><br>
--Fromper<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/juggle.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":juggle:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Fromper</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
10 is old for a rabbit, but it isn't unheard of. My sister's last pair of bunnies were both around 10 years old when they died.<br><br><br><br>
Back to the original topic, those two bunnies were neutered as soon as they were old enough (around 4-5 months old, I think). Oddly, once they got older, they still tried to have sex with each other. Even more oddly, it was usually the female who mounted the male.<br><br><br><br>
--Fromper<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/juggle.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":juggle:"></div>
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Yeah, sometimes female rabbits will hump other rabbits (male or female) to show their dominance. Rabbits do have a pecking order of sorts, especially when in captivity.<br><br><br><br>
Identity_Thief it's good you are trying to keep your rabbit busy and help him out. He seems very spoiled! Keep up the good work!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Identity_thief</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
We got him neutered pretty young...about as soon as you can without it being dangerous actually though.<br><br><br></div>
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Good to hear you got him neutered so young.<br><br><br><br>
I had a female rabbit until she passed away and I know there is a high incidence in female-related cancers in bunnies that aren't spayed.<br><br><br><br>
Good luck! Sounds like you got a lot of good advice here from posters.
 

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We alter LOTS of adult rabbits and haven't seen a correlation with hormonal behavior returning based on the age when the rabbit was altered. The only times we've seen hormonal behavior return is due to an incomplete spay/neuter (not all reproductive tissue was removed, usually due to vet inexperience) or due to adrenal gland growths. You can do a blood test to determine if the bunny has high hormone levels and that will point you to finishing the spay/neuter (with a better vet usually!) or surgery for hormonal (i.e. adrenal) growths.<br><br><br><br>
I really haven't seen a "behavior" reason for the return of hormonal behavior like spraying and buzzing--there's usually a biological explanation. This shouldn't be confused with digging, chewing, or humping other rabbits, which are all normal rabbit behaviors even after spay/neuter.<br><br><br><br>
You might check out Etherbun on Yahoo Groups for a whole lot of house rabbit folks with more experience on these issues. <a href="http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/etherbun/" target="_blank">http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/etherbun/</a><br><br><br><br>
I would limit bunny's space to keep him and your home safe, but still provide plenty of exercise. That doesn't mean cage him all day if he's not amenable to it, but find a place that can be bunnyproofed or cleaned better and let him play there instead.
 
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