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I think that stating that (all) vegans cannot/do not consume honey oversimplifies the matter.

Consider:

http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegan

Quote:
A Vegan is a person that strives to remove all animal products from their lives. A vegan product is one that is free of all animal ingredients. ...

Animal products include all forms of meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, fur, leather, wool, silk, and byproducts such as gelatin, rennet, whey, and the like. The Vegan Society and most [Emphasis added] vegans include insect products such as honey in their definition[Emphasis added] as well. There is some debate on the finer points of what constitutes an animal product; some vegans avoid cane sugar that has been filtered with bone char and some won't drink beers and wines clarified with egg whites or isinglass (even though they are not present in the final product). Further, some vegans won't eat food cooked in pans if they have ever been used to cook meat, while other vegans are content to simply remove meat, fish, eggs, and milk from their diets.

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Today, however, there are some distinctions between different vegans based primarily on their motivation for following a vegan lifestyle.

"Dietary vegans" avoid animal products in their food although some are less than strict about "minor" ingredients such as honey.[Emphasis added]
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by dotnetdiva

There is a really good book out there that decribes what being vegan is. It's called "Being Vegan - Living with Conscience, Conviction, and Compassion" by Joanne Stepaniak. It really cleared the matter up for me. I wanted to eat honey, but after reading this book, I decided to give it up. If I ate honey, I wouldn't call myself vegan, I would be a pure vegetarian instead.

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I suggest reading that book.

I happen to like Joanne Stepaniak. I think she is a very dedicated person. And I hesitate to criticize her, since it seems there are so many other people who are eager to attack and condemn her.

But I do have one issue with Joanne, and I think it is relevant to bring it up here. I suppose you could call the issue her "writing style."

Joanne tends to write in a totally dogmatic style. If there is a problem or issue within the veg*n community, and if members of the veg*n community have proposed answers A, B, C, and D to the problem, and if Joanne believes that answer D is correct, she tends to write:

The answer to the problem is D.

She rarely or almost never writes:

Although some members of the veg*n community advocate A, B, and C, I believe that the best answer to the problem is D.

Joanne tends to leave out the "ifs, ands, or buts." You almost never see in her writings an "although ..." or a "but see ..." or any other device or mode of writing style that other authors commonly use to acknowledge dissenting points of view. And you won't find references to these dissenting authors or points of view in her footnotes, bibliographies, etc. I sometimes wonder whether she is unacquainted with these other authors, or whether she simply chooses to ignore them in her writings.

Joanne is also often less than clear--when she discusses language and linguistic usage--whether she is explaining how language is actually used, or whether she is advocating about how she feels that language should be used, and if the latter, whether anyone else agrees with her and uses language in the way she proposes. Put another way, it is easy for someone to come away after reading Joanne's writings and speak "Stepaniak-ese" rather than English.
 

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One other comment, brown rice syrup can also be used instead of honey. It is favored by many in the macrobiotic community.
 
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