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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who homeschools or plans on homeschooling? I plan to, but I'm a little scared. I did meet up with a local homeschooling group, but so far it seems like my kids are much younger than the kids in that group. My oldest is only 3. I was wondering if those who have homeschooled could tell me how they went about it for the "preschool" years. Or any interesting stories or helpful advice?
 

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Vegmom I homeschool..........my dd is 6 and is "1st grade"........but she works at higher grade level on most stuff..........my 3 yo of course is just along for the ride at this point, i dont do anything structured with him.

we border on being unschoolers, although we do actual language arts and math curriculum.

I love homeschooling and I cant say enough about it, and the benefits of homeschooling, I actually think its the best thing for kids, given that the parents are able to do it.

I will PM you with some links to get you started on gathering information.

oh and I joined a homeschool group before my dd was old enough for school, it helps to connect and if you have any questions you have someone local to ask. every state has different laws regarding hs and i happen to live in one of the most restrictive states, ( you do too Janie )........but some states are very easy to homeschool in.

but anyway, i am rambling, i will PM you some links.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, I just PMed you back, I hadn't even seen this response. I think my stsate is one of the more lenient states. From what I've heard, all I have to do is send in a letter when my child is 7 that says she will be homeschooled.
 

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i don't have any children yet, but my dh and i are very interested in homeschooling, particularly unschooling.

i'm really into unschooling. i think it's an amazing process. it basicly takes the approach that children are learning all the time.
bonolvr may have already given you some unschooling links, but i'll dig them up if she hasn't.
 

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vegmom, I was homeschooled until I went to college. Many homeschoolers would tell you it's never too early to start. In fact, most stay-at-home parents of preschoolers probably already teach them much of what traditional preschools do. Can you teach your child cutting and gluing? Can you teach your child to form shapes out of clay? Can you involve your child in the every day aspects of your life, from mixing food before baking to ironing hankerchiefs to picking up the toys? Lots of 3-year-olds want desperately to do whatever Mommy/Daddy does. They're soooo curious, too. It requires a lot of patience from the parent, sure. Nothing is simple or easy when you add a small child to the mix.

From what I hear, homeschooling a child before the age of 5 is quite easy and is often less structured than later. More like unschooling, but you might have specific goals you expect your child to meet.
 

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So I don't know a whole lot about it, but can't you apply the concept of unschooling to your children's lives AND send them to conventional school? They are only in school 5-6 hours a day? Can't you teach them LOTS in the unschooling way in the other time?

From Sandra Dodd's website:

"LEARNING ALL THE TIME

People learn by playing, thinking and amazing themselves. They learn while they're laughing at something surprising, and they learn while they're wondering "What the heck is this!?" "

Can't you do that anyway? Even if you send your kid to school?

Unless, of course, you have a strong objection to regular school for whatever reason. It just seems to me that one of the problems with conventional schooling is that many parents figure the school does all the work, and they're off the hook. They don't have to do anything.

Or maybe there is something I'm missing. ?
 

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nookle's right on target. The parenting and schooling experts I've read seem to indicate the biggest success factor in a child's life is not who schools them but if their parents are positively involved in their lives.
 

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Sorry to butt in, but what is unschooling? I've never heard of that before.

I always wished that I could homeschool, but I'm a single mom, so I can't really be a stay at home mom. Plus I'm going to college in the fall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the responses. Actually, I used to be a daycare teacher and have taken courses in early childhood education. I also have curriculum books and things. Haha. I have more than enough ideas, but I'm a major worry wart and always afraid I'm not doing something right. I guess one of my concerns is that my daughter seems a little behind other kids her age, when it comes to things like letter/number recognition, even speech a little. She does great with art projects and things, she's learning how to use scissors and doing pretty well. I go back and forth between thinking she's just fine and worrying like crazy. I guess I was just wondering if there was some major book or website or something I should be looking at to make sure she's on track.

Skylark, I know it's a long way off for me, but I'm just wondering, how did the whole getting into college thing go? Are you glad you were homeschooled? Do you ever wish you went to regular school?

Cassiopeia, I know it would probably be really hard, but I actually met a woman who is a single working mom and homeschools as well. I think that because it is one on one, you don't have to spend as much time as a school does. I don't know if I could do it, but I guess it's possible.
 

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I was also homeschooled until I went to college and plan to homeschool once my husband and I have children of the two-legged kind. Until then, I'll keep teaching kindergarten and experimenting on other people's kids.


As fate would have it, I'm presently teaching in a country with one of the most rigorous educational systems in the world. Half of my "junior kindergartners" are barely three years old western age, and they're supposed to be completing texts designed for kindergartners in N. America.
Unfortunately, preschools and kindergartens over here get so focused on academics that a lot of kids hit elementary and even middle or high school without having ever mastered basic social skills.

After having taught in this environment for four years now, I'm bound and determined NOT to push my own kids. We will read together, play together, do art and craft projects together, cook together, experiment together, make music together, etc. But I want them to view learning as a natural part of life, I want them to love learning new things, and I want them to be life-long learners. Yes, we will do some book work along the way, but probably not until they're at least five or six years olds. I won't say that workbooks and textbooks are intrinsically bad, but I do think they tend to hamper more than help if they're incorporated too early. I know that as a teacher, I spend a lot of time of the time getting three- and four-year-olds through (school-mandated) worksheets and textbooks that make parents thing they're learning, while most of the actual learning takes place during what those same parents would consider "play time."
 

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"read together, play together, do art and craft projects together, cook together, experiment together, make music together, etc. But I want them to view learning as a natural part of life, I want them to love learning new things, and I want them to be life-long learners. Yes, we will do some book work along the way, but probably not until they're at least five or six years olds."

This is pretty much how we do things here, I didnt start any workbooks with my dd til she hit 5 yo and then its only phonics and math. everything else is based on her interests, and i work phonics and math into everyday things as well, we dont really need to workbooks, but she finds them fun, so i stick with them. if she hated them i would do something else,
 

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What are the benifits of homeschooling? Aren't you afraid that you're kids will not be as well rounded and not learn team skills? Don't you think that the parents are trying to make there kids too much like themselves?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by flipper View Post

What are the benifits of homeschooling? Aren't you afraid that you're kids will not be as well rounded and not learn team skills? Don't you think that the parents are trying to make there kids too much like themselves?
The benefits of homeschooling are many. Just to name a few. They get to be kids longer, they dont have to have a one size fits all education, they get to move ahead if they are ready, or stay behind if they need to, they dont have to conform to what a government inspired educational program says they should do......they get to develop their interest, example spend more time on math, or science, or art or whatever, we can delve very deeply into a topic of interest.

they get to socialize with kids of ALL ages, it is very un-natural to be with others your same age all the time, this is not natural socialization. we all have read the stories of kids being expected to be quiet at lunch, and we all know the classroom isnt for socializing, so they get to socialize, what maybe 10 minutes on a playground where all the kids are going so crazy from being cooped up and told to be quiet, sit still, stand in line, wait , go etc etc etc.

they learn proper socialization from life in general, going on field trips with kids of all ages, going to the market, the mall, the playground, the library,

team sports, my kids do gymnastics ( my dd is on the team), they also play soccer, and do nature classes at our local audubon society.

there are many many ways to "socialize" and just being in society every day does it, extra activities does it.

its endless, i coud go on and on, but i will stop here.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegmomof2 View Post

Skylark, I know it's a long way off for me, but I'm just wondering, how did the whole getting into college thing go? Are you glad you were homeschooled? Do you ever wish you went to regular school?
Getting into college was easy. I was a post-secondary education student, which is a program in Ohio to get high school students into college early. I was 17 when I began college full-time. The college had had good experiences with other homeschooled students, and I had a decent ACT score, so they were willing to take a chance on me. The state only kicks in half of the tuitionthe school eats the rest. I just had to pay for a parking permit and an activities fee. Even books were included (as long as I didn't want to keep them when I was done with the year.)

Yes, I'm glad I was homeschooled, but I now realize I had opportunities and resources available to me I didn't take advantage of. At times I wished I went to a different school, but it was never a public school. Several kids in my church youth group went to a large Christian school, and for awhile I wanted to go there. My parents wouldn't hear of it, though. The school was 40 minutes from our house and more expensive than homeschooling. There was another school, a small, fundy Christian school that we checked into. I'm glad I didn't go there. We used the same curriculum as them the next year, and I hated it. I couldn't wait to be done with School of Tomorrow courses.

Quote:
What are the benifits of homeschooling? Aren't you afraid that you're kids will not be as well rounded and not learn team skills? Don't you think that the parents are trying to make there kids too much like themselves?
Ah, spoken like a true novice. No worries, though. People hear about ideas at different times.

While I didn't have daily contact with a large group of my peers, I learned to interact with a wider variety of people than generally populate a public school classroom. Public-schooled kids aren't necessarily any better at group projects for having done more of them. I was always one of the two or three people in the group doing most of the work. And that's life. Very rarely have I done any kind of group effort, whether in the workplace or elsewhere, that everyone did exactly the same amount of work.

My parents didn't make me exactly like them. Neither are my sisters. While my 21-year-old sister decided to follow in our mother's footsteps and learn how to be a stay-at-home homeschooling wife and mother, people who attend public school decide that sometimes, too. My parents both graduated from public high schools. I've moved out, work a full-time job that requires a college degree, and I don't rely on my parents for every little thing. My 17-year-old sister will probably move out long before the age at which I did. It's too soon to say what the 10-year-old twins will do when they're of age.

My dad is a chemist. Trust me, none of us are interested in pursuing careers in science. One of the twins might, though, if her interest in space and aeronautics lasts. But that's a bit early to say.
 
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