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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have any thoughts on this? I would like to homeschool my kids if I can.<br><br><br><br>
Anyone homeschooled themselves?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Avalon</i><br><br><b><br><br>
Anyone homeschooled themselves?</b></div>
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Yes.
 

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I went to public school but I definately want my kids (when I have some) homeschooled. Unless we can start a Vegan private school ,and then I would send my kids there.
 

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I'm a public school brat myself. Had to be since mom was a teacher and dad was an elected school board member.<br><br><br><br>
I've got several friends that homeschool their kids and for a few it's ok, for others it's a disaster. I personally would never attempt it with my own kids, they deserve better. I have never been trained as a teacher and I'm not competent in any way to take on such a chore, and neither is Mrs. Bank.<br><br><br><br>
Also, I think an important part of growing up is social interaction with other kids, and they just won't get the same amount at home. They also lose out on the use of facilities such as gymnasiums, pools, etc. as well as team sports with their school peers. I know you can always take them to the YMCA but I don't think it would be the same.<br><br><br><br>
Finally, I wonder just how capable many parents are to take on this role. It's a nice thought and surely you can shield your kids from the ways of the world, but you can do the same thing in a private academy without losing out on all the aforementioned perks, AND have the benefit of a professionally trained teacher. The private school route has been the answer for us . . . . <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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I go to a public school and if i have kids there is no way i will make them suffer in that prison of terror. I hate it and I dont know anyone who doesnt. It will only lead to depression. I think homeschooling is fine. and who says your sheltering them from the world? They can still make friends or join clubs outside of school. And they still gain the same knowledge because I bet kids at public schools never read their textbooks whereas kids homeschooled will have too. And people who read are smart.<br><br><br><br>
Edited to add: I am just basing my opinion on experience. i go to school for about 8 hours and half of that time we dont even do anything. half of it is a waste of time. If I was homeschooled I could actually be doing something and could concentrate without all the chit chatting.
 

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Bank,<br><br>
I agree that not all parents are capable of homeschooling their children, but I think more are capable of it than think they are. A parent doesn't need a teaching degree to homeschool; a parent doesn't even need to have graduated from college to be able to teach his/her children. Parents don't have to teach straight out of their heads--many homeschool curricula exist, along with a plethora of other resources for parents lacking in confidence.<br><br><br><br>
Yes, social interaction is important, but it is debatable whether spending all day with peers of the exact same age is beneficial. Homeschooling allows children to interact with people of a variety of ages, maturity levels, and ability levels. Have you ever heard an adult complain that "kids these days don't know how to talk with adults?" This is much less frequent in homeschooling circles because children grow up interacting with and conversing with adults. Compared to my public-schooled friends, I was extremely conversant with adults.<br><br><br><br>
Sure, there is no absolute guaruntee that homeschooling will produce wonderful fruit in children and parents, but for parents who act according to their deepest desires for their children, it can be an incredible benefit. My family started homeschooling way back when homeschooling was really uncool, back when they were some of the only people doing it. Since then, the homeschooling movement has grown enormously. I know multitudes of homeschoolers, and while certainly there are bad examples, I would say that the majority have found it to be a blessing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I whole heartedly agree, LC. I HATED public school, and I am not a 'bad kid' saying that. I was not a troublemaker. I learned, etc. But it was still a highly damaging experience, emotionally speaking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PLus, I learned DICKALL.<br><br><br><br>
I wish I could have had a more creative and/or challenging curriculum.<br><br><br><br>
MOst home-schooled kids I knew were so much further ahead of what we ever did in public school.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
My close second choice for my eventual kids would be to find a good private school and one that doesn't turn all the chicks into hoochie little sluts.
 

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i went to public school-which i never found horrible as a whole- but i've seen some different families who have used homeschooling.<br><br><br><br>
my one thought- the children don't get enough science and math. a lot of people seem to be "scared" of math and to a certain degree science so they do the bare minimum when homeschooling. then when the kids get to high school age, they don't have the resources that even public schools have ie. chemicals, models etc.<br><br><br><br>
i have heard of kids being homeschooled up to say grade eight and then being put into a public high school, but i know a few families that refuse to even do that.<br><br><br><br>
i don't like the idea of homeschooling. i don't think that every parent is meant to be a teacher. and yes, i do think that teachers should have to earn a degree (or two, like we do here) in order to teach- at home or in the public/private school systems. i don't understand why there's such a double standard in regards to education for homeschool teachers vs. public school teachers- so it's ok to butcher lessons with your own kids, but you have to learn how to teach other people's kids?<br><br><br><br>
and yes, i do understand that now matter if a child is homeschooled or not, the parent or parents are still "teachers" in that child's life. i guess homeschooling just rubs me the wrong way because of what i've seen.
 

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I went to public schools all my life. Although when I have kids there is no way I will send them to the same schools I went to, I will probably want them to go to public schools, as my experiences w/private school people was that they were extremely snobby--about 95% of the students at the 2 local private high schools in my area drove BMW'w & Mercedes, most of which were 16th birthday presents! The students there were all about money, & that is not the kind of environment I would want for my own kids (if & I went I have any).<br><br>
I also teach in a public school. The school I am at is a low performing school. Although its an elementary school & the kids themselves are too young to get involved in too much negative activity, quite a few of them come from gang families. Hence, this is the other extreme. When I have kids I definitely won't be sending them here!<br><br>
BTW, I do realize that not all private schools are like the ones in the area I grew up in...thats just my own experience w/them.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Bankruptor</i><br><br><b>I'm a public school brat myself. Had to be since mom was a teacher and dad was an elected school board member.<br><br></b></div>
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That's funny, Bank. Because we sort of have just the opposite here in Tennessee, or so I was told by my exGF, who was a public school teacher.<br><br><br><br>
What I am saying, in case it isn't clear, is that we have public school teachers who (1) send their own children to private schools, (2) work in the public schools solely to make money to afford to send their own children to private schools, and (3) loudly and publicly and repeatedly tell their students, their fellow teachers and everyone else items (1) and (2).<br><br><br><br>
In other words, these teachers were practically telling their students: "You are getting an inferior education and I am giving you an inferior education. But I don't give a damn because I am really just here to make money to send <b>my own</b> children to <b>private</b> schools where they will get a <b>real</b> education."<br><br><br><br>
Of course, my ex was appalled by these attitudes, but she told me they were fairly common among public school teachers here.
 

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My 17-year-old brother is home schooled. He just took his exams so he can go back to public school, and he scored insanely high in math and English, and slightly above average in science and history. I, on the other hand, have been rather happy with public school. I think it all has to do with how you work in different environments, the way you adapt to change, and the sort of teachers you get (I was lucky to have mostly good ones; Aaron was unlucky and had some horrible, evil, hellspawned teachers).<br><br><br><br>
My brother's success was totally unprecedented. The whole family believed (though we never said it) he would do poorly because we assumed my mom was a bad teacher. After I saw his scores, I asked my mother if I could look at some of her old lesson plans, and they were so detailed and interesting and some were even fun, and I was rather jealous, because most of my teachers seem to think learning should be boring...<br><br>
He really wants to go back to public school because he's lonely at home. However, he doesn't want to go to the school he should go to, if anyone in Guilford County actually went to the school according to district, the one where all his friends go. He wants to go to the one I go to, because he told my mom he wants to have the same opportunities I had. It warms yer innards, that. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
I have tentative plans to become a public school teacher (although that idea is beginning to fade because I really want to leave the US after I graduate college) because I'm naive enough to think I can singlehandedly change everything wrong with public schools.
 

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Our children have done everything, depending upon where we were living. Right now, my oldest is attending the University, my teenage sons attend the local HS and my 2 youngest attend a Montessori school.<br><br>
When my teenage sons were younger, they homeschooled for a couple of years. My now nine-year-old homeschooled for grades 1 & 2.<br><br>
The only reason that I put her in school last year was for peer interaction. (Which she loves)<br><br>
When we lived in CO the public schools were quite good, by comparison.<br><br>
I grew up attending public school (in Washington State) and some years were enjoyable, some were not, depending on the teacher.<br><br>
I am considering homeschooling my younger children again. I miss them and they miss their freedom. (I unschooled them)<br><br>
Some benefits from homeschooling are; my children seem to be kinder, more innocent and less fad oriented. It's wonderful not to have to be on a schedule...we have fun staying up late together.
 

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Joe, I can see that and it's awful for all involved. Keep in mind that my grade school years were in the 60s and early 70s and times were a bit different back then. Private schools were available but offered no real advantage in terms of the quality of personnel or instruction back then.<br><br><br><br>
From what I can tell, public school in my locale is now basically a minimum security prison. Much different than 30 years ago . . . . <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 

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I have been considering homeschooling my (future) children.<br><br><br><br>
I attended public school and feel the only thing worthwhile where the science and math classes. Other than that, I feel I didn't learn anything until college. (Not to mention the fact that several of my, and my sister's teachers where physically/verbally abusive.)<br><br><br><br>
I definitely have more education than any public school teacher, but the question is, can that information be delivered by me effectively to a young child - that is what a good teacher can do. I have been testing the waters by spending some time/tutering one young child in my family, and plan to spend more time doing so in the near future. If the experiences continue to be positive, I may decide to homeschool.
 

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Might I add that my science and math were not lacking... my parents are quite interested in both. Since my dad is an environmental chemist, I knew how to measure in grams on the scale since I was 2, how to operate a microscope since I was 3, and I've done more hands-on experiments than I ever wanted to. I hear the ins and outs of upper level chemistry frequently, and when I don't know what something is/means, I ask, and my dad explains it. How many other 12-year-olds knew what an ion chromatograph was?<br><br><br><br>
While I hated math, both my parents were excellent explainers. My dad is one of the best "help the student teach herself" teachers I've ever met, which means I learned the concepts a whole lot better than simple memorization. My mom's fortes were more in the liberal arts.
 

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For those who seem to believe that public school teachers are lacking in knowledge...many teachers have degrees & experience in other areas. So please don't assume that just because someone teaches in a public school they lack knowledge or education!
 
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