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Discussion Starter #1
Please forgive me if this has already been discussed.<br><br>
My daughter and I have been having a lot of heart to heart<br><br>
talks about animal rights, etc.. and she brought up a very<br><br>
interesting idea:<br><br>
Let's pretend that one day everyone in the whole wide world<br><br>
sees the light and BAM! all production of anything animal stops.<br><br>
No more factory farming, no more fur, nothing.<br><br>
What would we do with all those animals?What about<br><br>
their future?
 

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Are you wondering what we think will happen if everyone in the world suddenly becomes veg*n?
 

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Our entire way of life would need to change, including such things as organic agriculture, which largely relies on animal products for fertilizer. Not very many people practice veganic agriculture.
 

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If somehow everyone became veg*n at once, I imagine that the economy would be a little wacky for a while... So much of the economy is driven by the support of livestock that there would have to be an adjustment period.<br><br><br><br>
I also wonder what would happen to those animals already born and bred for consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>synergy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Are you wondering what we think will happen if everyone in the world suddenly becomes veg*n?</div>
</div>
<br>
Exactly.
 

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Some domestic animals can adjust easily to the wild. Pigs, for instance, revert to the wild state in only a couple generations. Most breeds of chickens could also make the transition, and probably beef cattle, but not milk cattle. The most common breeds of turkeys can't even breed naturally, so they wouldn't make it. Sheep, except hair sheep, probably wouldn't make it.
 

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We would either have to continue to care for those who can't care for themselves (wool sheep, milk cows, turkeys, etc) or humanely kill them, or allow them to die rather miserable deaths.... "Releasing" them would be extremely cruel, in my opinion, and they probably wouldn't leave anyway, but rather hang around humans, who they understand will feed them and care for them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Ludi</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Some domestic animals can adjust easily to the wild. Pigs, for instance, revert to the wild state in only a couple generations. Most breeds of chickens could also make the transition, and probably beef cattle, but not milk cattle. The most common breeds of turkeys can't even breed naturally, so they wouldn't make it. Sheep, except hair sheep, probably wouldn't make it.</div>
</div>
<br>
OK, you answered my question. That's what I feel .
 

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If they were prevented from breeding (all humanely neutered, for instance), most kinds would die out in less than 20 years, except those who live a long time such as cats and cattle (up to 30 years) and geese and horses (up to 50 years).<br><br><br><br>
So the generation who chooses to divorce mankind from his companions/servants would only need to be caretakers for that generation, 25 years or so....
 

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Let's keep in mind that animal population levels are at extreme highs compared to what they would be in nature.<br><br><br><br>
I'm not addressing anyone or trying to argue anything. Just wanted to throw that in there.
 

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They've in a way taken the place of the once-vast wild animal populations, such as the Passenger Pigeon, and the Bison....There were naturally huge populations of birds and other animals, destroyed to make way for what our culture wanted instead....
 

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That's actually my mil's arguement against veganism. She thinks that it would be more wrong to let the farm animals go extinct than to continue the current factory farming practices. I think that if it ever happens that humans no longer eat meat or use animal products, that it would be a slow process and that some animals may learn to exist on their own in the wild while others will be kept as pets.
 

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It makes me wonder exactly how many animals we'd have around if humans had never domesticated and imprisoned animals.<br><br><br><br>
How many cows would we see? Chickens, sheep, pigs? Cats and dogs? It's interesting to think about what the population levels would be like.
 

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I agree with Ludi.<br><br><br><br>
I would assume we could make old, nasty farms into new snactuaries [and bredding facilities even] for the animals that cannot be released.<br><br><br><br>
They'd have to stay as pets more or less, but I don't see anything wrong with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Makes you wonder...<br><br>
My dad used to tell me to be "careful what you chew on,'cause<br><br>
you'll have to swaller it".<br><br>
We'd have to ""swaller"quite a bit.Not only what to do with the<br><br>
animals but what to do about all those humans who would be<br><br>
left unemployed.<br><br>
Maybe they could be reassigned as caretakers?
 

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Depending on the condition of the animals, some would need to be kept in shelters or even humanely euthanized -- ie., That chicken on the Carl's Jr./Hardees commercial (chickens bred to have unnaturally large breasts). Many animals would be in good enough condition to be taken care of. Of course, if you needed to redirect a large amount of land for the sake of farming vegetables for human consumption, suddenly manure would be more of a commodity and less of a waste.
 

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If this ever happens, I will be doing a really really long and crazy happy dance. I will also quit whatever job I happen to be doing to devote myself to helping people, animals and the economy transition as smoothly and sustainably as possible, in whatever capacity I could.
 
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