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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Bruno has had hip dysplasia since he was a baby. Although it is a mild form of it, he still gets a bit limpy and hurts from the resulting arthritis sometimes if he's been running around too much.<br><br><br><br>
For the last five years, I have been giving him glucosamine with willow bark, which has helped him tremendously. I know the glucosamine is not vegan, much less vegetarian, but without it he would be constantly limping and wouldn't be able to go on walks with me for more than 10 minutes (we take him on at least a fast half hour walk or hike daily and he does fine).<br><br><br><br>
I have a friend that's a massage therapist who came over and showed me how to massage him to help a little bit. Does anyone have any other suggestions to help my sweetie? He's getting older now and I want to keep him as young as I can.
 

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I am very sorry to hear about your dog, Flower. Hugs to you both.<br><br><br><br>
What breed is he? Is it in both hips, or just one? Although I have never had a dog with hip dysplasia, I do know a bit about the disease. Depending on the severity, there are a few different treatments.<br><br><br><br>
Regular exercise and maintaining a good body weight are important for keeping the joints flexible. Also a warm environment will reduce some of the pain. You could try giving high doses of Vitamin C, as this has been shown to help lubricate joints, and since Vitamin C is water soluble, you don't have to worry about overdoses. Acupuncture and chiropractry may also help. Anti-inflammatory medications to control pain are often used, ie buffered aspirin, rimadyl, and cosequin. I have also heard of people using some type of leg sling, to support the joint, and reduce pain. It looks like a little jacket.<br><br><br><br>
Most cases of hip dysplasia are treated by surgery. Three main types of surgery are performed, depending on the case. The first is Femoral Head Ostectomy, where the entire head of the femur is removed. The part of the femur remaining will make a false joint. It's not as good as a real joint, but it does reduce pain.<br><br><br><br>
The second type of surgery is called Triple Pelvic Ostectomy, which is used for mild cases in younger dogs. The pelvis is cut in three places, and the head of the femur is rotated, so that it fits better into the hip socket. It is then fixed in place with bone plates.<br><br><br><br>
The third type of surgery is Total Hip Replacement. The neck and head of the femur are completely removed and are replaced with implants. The implants are usually made of stainless steel or titanium.<br><br><br><br>
In any event, I suggest you go to your vet. Have some x-rays done to determine just how bad the case is. If possible compare them to those taken when he was first diagnosed, so you can see how it is progressing. Your vet can come up with a treatment plan that is best suited for your dog's case, and refer you to other specialists who may be able to help (ie animal physical therapists, acupuncturists, etc)<br><br><br><br>
Good luck, and hugs to you and your pooch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the great advice, SilverC! He's a rottweiler, and was diagnosed with it by our vet when he was a year old. It's not very severe at all, not enough to warrant surgery, so the vet put him through some chiropractic treatments for a while. Those seemed to help. It's in both hips, but he seems to favor one side over the other when the arthritis flares up. He just spend 9 days at my husband's parents when we took our honeymoon. They were supposed to be giving him the glucosamine twice a day, but must not have because he's got a pretty bad limp now. I've found out the hard way that it's not a good thing to stop giving it to him. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> I'm pretty upset with them. I mean, how hard is it to give to him twice a day?<br><br><br><br>
I do give him Tylenol Arthritis when he's hurting, which helps a lot. I'll have to give the Vitamin C a try to see how it goes. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's made out of shellfish, unfortunately. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 

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You might want to get a second opinion. My finace's family dog was diagnosed with hip displaysia a few years ago. After years of expensive treatments and a lot of heartache, a more thorough investigation by a different vet discovered that the problem was much less severe. It's worth a shot anyway, just as with human illnesses and doctors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Flower, I have a rottie myself, who's 10 years old. She fortunately doesn't have dysplasia, but does have arthritis in her front legs. It's so sad as they get older, for they are such a noble breed! I hope your pup has a long, pain free life. Good luck to you both!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the good wishes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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