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Originally Posted by lachry View Post

I wouldn't get too excited.

I haven't looked into this at any great depth but it seems to accept that 'meat avoiders' are vegetarians.

"More than 33 percent of the men and women in the study described themselves as vegetarians but said they ate white meat and fish."

This, obviously, renders the study mostly useless. I have a huge problem with meat-eating 'vegetarians'. Don't get me wrong - it's good that there are some animals they are not eating. But they are not vegetarians and they should stop calling themselves that. (Likewise, scholars should stop allowing people to "self-define" themselves as vegetarians. Most of the academic papers I have read do allow too much leeway on this.)

It's entirely objective: if you eat meat, you are not a vegetarian.

Nobody claims to be teetotal because they do not drink bear - but drink vodka, etc - so why should scholars allow such inconsistencies when it comes to diet?

Just over 4 percent were "strict vegetarians" and 2 percent vegans. Well, is that all? If we take 'strict vegetarians' to be ACTUAL vegetarians then obviously we're not able to conclude anything from the study.

It's conclusions should be that meat-avoiders are more intelligent etc - because it isn't actually studying real vegetarians, only fake ones.
Excellent point. I agree completely.
 

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Originally Posted by veggielove View Post

Obviously if you eat any meat you are not vegetarian. But only a third of the people said they ate chicken or fish - the other 2/3rds probably actually WERE vegetarian. "strict vegetarians" .... who knows what that means..... we've had debates here about that amongst ourselves.
Veggielove,

The 'vegetarian group' had 366 people in it, of whom only 266 were actually vegetarians, because the other 100 said they ate chicken or fish. What would be interesting is to know how the IQ of the 266 actual vegetarians compared to the IQ of the 7913 actual non-vegetarians. Sticking 100 of the non-vegetarians into the vegetarian group stops us from being able to draw a valid conclusion about vegetarians vs. non-vegetarians. This is known as the error of misclassification.
 

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Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

It seems you didn't notice this part of the article then:

This is known as the error of not reading things carefully.
Thanks for pointing out that error! I have to admit I'm a little bleary-eyed this morning. I need to get some sleep.

So then, I guess the conclusion is that for whatever reason, people who either avoid meat, or who are vegetarian have higher IQs.

In any case, I think it would be nice to see more studies of vegetarians and vegans, and in particular to see ones where the number of vegetarians and omnis being compared is more equivalent. In this study there is a very small number of 'vegetarians' being compared to a very large number of non-vegetarians.
 
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