VeggieBoards banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've had tinnitus for over a year and a half now, and recently went to an ear/nose/throat doctor, and he had blood tests done to check my cholesterol (apparently that can be a contributing factor w/tinnitus) and my GP called me today and told me that yes, I do have high cholesterol! 240! I was absolutely floored! I consider myself a fairly healthy person...I'm 22, I'm vegan (have been for 3 years, vegetarian for over 6) I don't eat fried foods, rarely eat "junk" food, never add salt to anything, stay away from saturated fat, eat plenty of whole grain foods, I get moderate exercise, take multivitamins, I'm actually underweight for my height, etc... -the junkiest food I eat would be plain potato chips-I gave up french fries awhile ago. I'm horrified! I already have a heart condition, so I worry about heart attacks-especially since the past 10months I've been under TONS of stress.<br><br>
I don't know what to do! My doctor told me to stick w/a healthy diet and exercise, but that's pretty much already what I do. All I can think of is to exercise more, and get a bigger variety of foods in my diet and really focus to make sure I get all my nutrients. Will that possibly be enough??? I'm assuming my high cholesterol is due to genetics, if that's the case is it possible to lower it w/out meds? 240 sounds REALLY high considering my lifestyle. My dad was baffled when I told him, he doesn't see how that's possible w/me. Anybody else who's generally healthy had this problem? Anything specific that helped it? Thank you all in advance for your replies...again I'm just horrified! I freak out enough about my health, so this isn't helping!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
I'm hoping that this will be clear:<br><br><br><br>
different people have different cholesterol needs and therefore no chart or normalization is going to be adequate for individual application. But, since you have a secondary symptom, it is important that you lower your cholesterol. It may not lower 'enough' to meet the chart's (and therefore doctor's) standard, but as long as your symptoms go away and you are generally healthy, a 'high' cholesterol reading may be both genetic and healthy for you (high cholesterol can help maintain heart health, particularly if you have other heart conditions that are not 'heart disease.')<br><br><br><br>
So, i'll give you some tips on lowering cholesterol with diet--focusing on specific nutrients--<br><br><br><br>
instead of any forms of breads--for a time at least--convert to only using whole grains. most breads are made from over-processed flours. the only ones that aren't are sprouted-grain breads such as ezekiel brand. so, cut out *all* breads for a while for whole grains, and when your cholesterol levels lower use only sprouted grain breads. this should greatly decrease your triglyceride levels.<br><br><br><br>
avoid all white sugar to lower triglyceride levels.<br><br><br><br>
increase your intake of whole beans (sprouted or cooked) to increase your b vitamin spectrum. this helps lower homocystine levels.<br><br><br><br>
find a source for betaine in your diet. betaine comes from beet sugar, so consuming beets may be a good option. if you can't consume beets, finding wine made with beet sugar is another option. Not all wines are made with beet sugar, so you'll have to check to make sure. Pomegranite juice may also have some betaine. make sure you get unsweetened pomegranite juice. Betaine also helps lower homocystine and cholesterol levels.<br><br><br><br>
Finally, when your symptoms go away, then you have the indication that your cholesterol level is appropriate. even if it doesn't look 'low' on the charts, you needn't take medication. simply, maintain a healthy diet and exercise (you may also want to consider lifting weights which is great for the heart and will help you gain weight) and your cholesterol levels will be appropriate for you. medication is not necessary just to make you feet the current medical-cultural normatives for cholesterol levels.<br><br><br><br>
good luck to you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,644 Posts
C-reactive protein measurements are a much better indicator of heart disease than cholesterol, IMO. Have your CRP levels measured to get the real story on where you stand with heart disease.<br><br><br><br>
That said, make sure your folate levels are good, especially with intake of deep green leafy veggies. The green leafies are rich in folates which, along with proper B12 and B6, help lower homocystine levels, but they're also rich in Vitamin K which is showing to be a very heart-healthy vitamin in and of itself.<br><br><br><br>
I think I also read that magnesium is very heart-healthy, too but I'm not sure on that - I'll have to find the book I read that from to verify this (then again, dietary magnesium is good for other things as well so making sure you have good intake of magnesium isn't a bad idea, IMO).<br><br><br><br>
The rest, I have to agree with Zoebird on. Avoid processed grains, stay clear of hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, go for whole foods/real foods as much as you can and increase your beans, beets and deep green leafy veggies intake. Oh, and don't do the crisps anymore... there's a compound that forms from frying starchy vegetables that is no good on the heart at all (alcamydine I think it's called? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thinking.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":think:"> ). I'm not sure if you're a canned veggie eater, but if you are then stop that as well and switch to either frozen or fresh veggies.<br><br><br><br>
The stress factor isn't that good for you either (which I'm sure you already know) so worrying yourself about your heart on top of everything else will NOT make things better at all. Things that help me a bit when I'm stressed out is to try to watch more comedy shows (laughter really IS the best medicine), stay around people that lift the soul instead of draining it (easier said than done, I do realise). Meditating or taking some "me" time is beneficial as well and so is exercise. Cardio helps me a lot, but weights are good, too - especially if you do super-slow lifting.<br><br><br><br>
Be well. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hug:">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,282 Posts
I have a similar problem with my cholesterol. My body produces W A Y too much! Did he do a full cholesterol profile so you could see your LDL and HDL cholesterol? It will give you more information as to whether it is a problem. For example, my cholesterol is about 220, my boyfriend (omni)'s is about 240. A good good-cholesterol to total cholesterol ratio is 5:1, ideal is 3.5:1. Mine is 3:1... my boyfriends.. for 20 more cholesterol points... is 9:1!! EEK!!<br><br><br><br>
I would suggest having that test done fasting, and then just make efforts to raise your good cholesterol: Omega-3 fatty acids, oatmeal, good fats i.e. olive and canola oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
TY you all for your advice!!! I did have the tests done after fasting. I've been taking a good look at my diet and eliminating anything that's not super healthy. (such as chips-which I rarely eat, but will make sure not to again! Easy thing to give up, thankfully) I do lift weights, but I guess I'll lift them more. I've been going through recipes the past 2 days and have been doing a bit of research on cholesterol, so hopefully w/your alls help and what I've read up on, that I'll be able to lower it a bit and stick to an extremely healthy lifestyle to keep it in check. (maybe I will go mainly raw if that'd help) Thanks again!!!<br><br><br><br>
(oh, and i've always HATED canned veggies! I go fresh and frozen!)<br><br><br><br>
ETA: My doctor only told me my LDL, I have an appointment comming up though where we'll further discuss everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
instead of lifting weights more often, lift more weight less often. this will help build muscle and help you increase your weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,282 Posts
Weight training is great, but you need to do CARDIOVASCULAR exercise, y'know, for your heart. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
yeah, but that cardio may work against the weight gain needs. and weight training does work the heart, just differently than cardio.<br><br><br><br>
and certainly, i wasn't saying to be exclusive to weight training or cardio. but rather, do both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Cardio and weight lifting is pretty much all I do. I'll just have to do even more cardio, and maybe stick to my weight lifting. (I use 10lbs weights...about 30 reps3-4 times a week) I may increase my weights to 15lbs, then 20... I don't wanna bulk up though... I definitly don't need to gain weight, I just want a healthy heart and lower my bad cholesterol. I'm scheduled for another blood test early next month, so I'll see how it is then. I'm hoping I don't have to go on meds, and being extra healthy will do the trick, but I'll see. Everyone I know was surprised and assumes it's hereditary. If so, I hope I can lower it w/out meds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
you won't bulk up.<br><br><br><br>
women--and i assume you are one--don't bulk up. but, if you're underweight, it will help you gain muscle.<br><br><br><br>
increasing cardio will not help you gain weight. 30-45 minutes a day is appropriate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I discovered my cholesterol was high (235) when I got a physical for life insurance. I began following Dr. Furhman's Eat to Live plan (its vegan) and it dropped to 159. I think he has the best information out there on lowering cholesterol. A lot of the information on his sight you have to pay for, but there is also an Eat to live discussion board on Vegsource. Of course, no financial interest. Just pleased with the results.<br><br><br><br>
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>zoebird</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
you won't bulk up.<br><br><br><br>
women--and i assume you are one--don't bulk up. but, if you're underweight, it will help you gain muscle.<br><br><br><br>
increasing cardio will not help you gain weight. 30-45 minutes a day is appropriate.</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I do want to increase my muscle mass, I just don't wanna look 'abnormally' muscular for a woman, nor do I want/need to gain weight. Well, ok, muscle increasing my weight is fine by me, but I don't need to go up in pant size or anything. I just want my cholesterol lowered!<br><br><br><br>
I'll definitly check out vegsource message boards!<br><br><br><br>
Geez, I thought being vegan made me a label reading freak! Being veg w/high cholesterol makes me obsessive compulsive about it!!!<br><br><br><br>
ETA: Yes, I am a woman... ETA again- duh, I think that was gathered when I said "I just don't wanna look 'abnormally' muscular for a woman"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
admittedly, i didn't recall when i responded and just wanted to make sure.<br><br><br><br>
i don't know what you mean or feel is 'abnormally muscular.'<br><br><br><br>
i do recall you stating that you were 'underweight' and therefore, i assumed that you would want to gain weight. gaining weight via muscle generally won't thicken your waist--you'll actually 'get smaller' in size because muscle takes up less space than fat. But, you may also gain more shape overall, which might require different cuts or styles of pants.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I just don't wanna end up looking like a female body builder. I've already got decent muscle tone, could be better though. I get toned really easily, so I just worry if I do a lot more exercising that I'll go past the point of a hard body to body builder! (which ok, is a bit of a stretch...I know it takes a lot more than exercising a lot to look like a body builder! I'm just a bit paranoid of looking "too" built) So yeah, I'm gonna concentrate mostly on doing more cardio, and slowly increasing my weight exercises while focusing on a much healthier diet ensuring I get all my daily required nutrients, and keep my fingers crossed that that'll be enough for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,451 Posts
you can't look like a female body builder unless you do steriods.<br><br><br><br>
if you want to know what natural women look like at the 'top of their game' you'll want to look at 'fitness' and 'figure' competitors. they are all natural.<br><br><br><br>
but, that body type is different from yours as well--most likely. most fitness and figure competitors are mesomorphs--and they're rarely underweight in their lives. as an ectomorph (common underweights), you probably won't get 'as muscular looking' as fitness/figure competitors.<br><br><br><br>
i competed a few years ago in a figure competition and got only moderate marks because i was considered "too thin"--it was because of my muscle shape--my ectomorph aspects. I can't make my muscles take the shape of the mesomorph--which is their preference in these competitions.<br><br><br><br>
but, another aspect of that competition was a lifting competition (squats, bench press, chin ups) and even though i was 'smaller' than others in shape, i was stronger than most of them too (on my weakest movements no less!). So, i did very well in that competition (i won the squat and chins, but came in third for bench).<br><br><br><br>
there's a bench competition at the end of the summer--so far i'm the only female competitor signed up. I actually hate bench pressing--but it's the only thing that they compete for around here. it's stupid, but whatever.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top