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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
NOT Recalled: Chicken Soup for the Cat Lover's Soul dry cat food.

The recalled brands of Diamond Pet Food contained toxic levels of aflatoxin, and the corn which developed this contaminant came from one single source. Since "Chicken Soup" contains no corn products, it was not recalled. The lack of corn is one of the reasons why I recommend Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover's Soul, and I will continue to recommend it and feed it to my own cats. (statement from a vet) www.cats.about.com/b/a/239580.htm

The recalled brands are: Cat Food! Americas Choice, Preferred Pets, Authority, Best Choice, Companion, Compliments, Demoulas Market Basket, Eukanuba, Fine Feline Cat, Food Lion, Foodtown, Giant Companion, Hannaford, Hill, country Fare, Hy-Vee, Iams, Key Food, Laura Lynn, Li'l Red, Loving Meals, Meijers Main Choice, Nutriplan, Nutro Max Gourment Classics, Nutro Natural Choice, Paws, Pet Pride, Presidents Choice, Price Chopper, Priority, Save-A-Lot, Schnucks, Science Diet (The recall affects only 3-ounce and 5.5-ounce cans of Kitten Savory Cuts Ocean Fish; 5.5-ounce cans of Feline Adult Savory Cuts Beef, Chicken and Ocean Fish, and 5.5-ounce cans of Feline Senior Savory Cuts Chicken.) Sophisticat, Special Kitty Canada, Special Kitty US, Springfield Prize, Sprout, Total Pet, My True Friend, Wegmans, Western Family, White Rose, Winn Dixie.

Dog Food! Americas Choice, Preferred Pets, Authority. Award, Best Choice, Big Bet, Big Red, Bloom, Bruiser, Cadillac, Companion, Demoulas Market Basket, Eukanuba, Food Lion, Giant Companion, Great Choice, Hannaford, Hill Country Fare, Hy-Vee, Iams, Key Food, Laura Lynn, Loving Meals, Meijers Main Choice, Mighty Dog (The recall affects only 5.3 pouch products that were produced from Dec. 3, 2006 through March 14, 2007.) Mixables, Nutriplan, Nutro Max, Nutro Natural Choice, Nutro, Ol'Roy, Paws, Pet Essentials, Pet Pride - Good 'n Meaty, Presidents Choice, Price Chopper, Priority, Publix, Roche Bros, Save-A-Lot, Schnucks, Shep Dog, Springsfield Prize, Sprout, Starter Bros,Total Pet, My True Friend, Western Family, White Rose, Winn Dixie, Your Pet.

Nestle Purina PetCare Co. and Hill's Pet Nutrition Inc. have just announced that as a precaution they are voluntary recalling some products made by Menu Foods. Menu, an Ontario-based company, is recalling dog food sold under 48 brands and cat food sold under 40 brands including Iams, Nutro and Eukanuba. The food was distributed throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico by major retailers such as Wal-Mart, Kroger and Safeway. Here's the list of brands affected by the Menu recall. The recall is limited to "cuts and gravy" style pet food that was sold in cans and pouches.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My cats absolutely love Chicken Soup . . . dry cat food. I make my own wet food by adding hot water to the dry food and stirring it a bit. They love the "gravy" and none goes to waste.

I've given up using canned cat food. If you knew what was in it, you would too. It includes euthanized cats and dogs from animal shelters - including their flea collars. Also, downer cows, chicken heads, feet, etc. And also road kill. All that goes to the giant rendering plants where they make pet food. It's a wonder more pets haven't died from that toxic mess.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver View Post

My cats absolutely love Chicken Soup . . . dry cat food. I make my own wet food by adding hot water to the dry food and stirring it a bit. They love the "gravy" and none goes to waste.

I've given up using canned cat food. If you knew what was in it, you would too. It includes euthanized cats and dogs from animal shelters - including their flea collars. Also, downer cows, chicken heads, feet, etc. And also road kill. All that goes to the giant rendering plants where they make pet food. It's a wonder more pets haven't died from that toxic mess.
That is actually not true. There are NO euthanized cats and dog in pet food. It has been proven not to be true by the FDA and the CVM. It's best to check on rumors before posting things. Can you post any studies indicating that road kill etc... is in pet food?

Here is my evidence to back it up... from http://www.fda.gov/cvm/Policy_Procedures/DFreport.doc (emphasis mine)

Quote:
The results demonstrated a complete absence of material that would have been derived from euthanized dogs or cats. The sensitivity of this method is 0.005% on a weight/weight basis; that is, the method can detect a minimum of 5 pounds of rendered remains in 50 tons of finished feed. Presently, it is assumed that the pentobarbital residues are entering pet foods from euthanized, rendered cattle or even horses.
 

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The complete paragraph that quote is taken from is as follows:

Quote:
CVM scientists, as part of their investigation, developed a test to detect dog and cat DNA in the protein of the dog food. All samples from the most recent dog food survey (2000) that tested positive for pentobarbital, as well as a subset of samples that tested negative, were examined for the presence of remains derived from dogs or cats. The results demonstrated a complete absence of material that would have been derived from euthanized dogs or cats. The sensitivity of this method is 0.005% on a weight/weight basis; that is, the method can detect a minimum of 5 pounds of rendered remains in 50 tons of finished feed. Presently, it is assumed that the pentobarbital residues are entering pet foods from euthanized, rendered cattle or even horses.
I've heard of that study before and I couldn't help but wonder how they were to determine if there was dog or cat DNA in material that had gone through the rendering process. Correct me if I am wrong, but it has always been my impression that DNA is destroyed at very high temperatures such as those they would be subjected to during rendering. (Part of the scare about mad cow disease is that the prions are so stable that they can survive the rendering process). If the DNA has been destroyed (i.e. broken down into amino acids), how can it be determined if any dog or cat DNA is in the sample? Would a test for bovine DNA in a pet food known to contain beef have be positive?

Can anyone shed any light on this subject?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Read this! Howard Lyman appeared on the Oprah show and said this. The cattle industry sued him and Oprah, and in court the jury/judge ruled that everything Lyman said is 100% TRUE. The cattlemen lost their lawsuit.

The Plain Truth From The Cattlerancher Who Won't Eat Meat

By Howard Lyman with Glen Merzer

I am a fourth-generation dairy farmer and cattle rancher. I grew up on a dairy farm in Montana, & I ran a feedlot operation there for 20 years. I know firsthand how cattle are raised and how meat is produced in this country. Today I am president of the International Vegetarian Union.

Sure, I used to enjoy my steaks as much as the next guy. But if you knew what I know about what goes into them and what they can do to you, you'd probably be a vegetarian like me. And believe it or not, as a pure vegetarian now who consumes no animal products at all, I can tell you that these days I enjoy eating more than ever.

When a cow is slaughtered, about half of it by weight is not eaten by humans: the intestines and their contents, the head, hooves, and horns, as well as bones and blood. These are dumped into giant grinders at rendering plants, as are the entire bodies of cows and other farm animals known to be diseased. Rendering is a $2.4 billion-a-year industry, processing forty billion pounds of dead animals a year. There is simply no such thing in America as an animal too ravaged by disease, too cancerous, or too putrid to be welcomed by the embracing arms of the renderer.

Another staple of the renderer's diet, in addition to farm animals, is euthanized pets - the six or seven million dogs and cats that are killed in animal shelters every year. The city of Los Angeles alone, for example, sends some two hundred tons of euthanized cats and dogs to a rendering plant every month. Added to the blend are the euthanized catch of animal control agencies, and roadkill. (Roadkill is not collected daily, and in the summer, the better roadkill collection crews can generally smell it before they can see it.)

When the gruesome mix is ground and steam-cooked, the lighter, fatty material floating to the top gets refined for use in such products as cosmetics, lubricants, soaps, candles, and waxes. The heavier protein material is dried and pulverized into a brown powder-about a quarter of which consists of fecal material. The powder is used as an additive to almost ALL pet food as well as to livestock feed. Farmers call it "protein concentrates." In 1995, five million tons of processed slaughterhouse leftovers were sold for animal feed in the United States. I used to feed tons of the stuff to my own livestock. It never concerned me that I was feeding cattle to cattle.

full story: www.amazon.com
 

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Intersting article Silver!

I only buy Solid Gold, Innova, or Wellness. They only use USDA approved meats and no by-products. Foods like Iams and Eukanuba are owned by Colgate Palmolive
, and Science Diet is owned by Proctor & Gamble
. It is disgusting how much money corporations make with fancy marketing while selling poison to pet owners. It makes me sad.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fyvel View Post

I've heard of that study before and I couldn't help but wonder how they were to determine if there was dog or cat DNA in material that had gone through the rendering process. Correct me if I am wrong, but it has always been my impression that DNA is destroyed at very high temperatures such as those they would be subjected to during rendering. (Part of the scare about mad cow disease is that the prions are so stable that they can survive the rendering process). If the DNA has been destroyed (i.e. broken down into amino acids), how can it be determined if any dog or cat DNA is in the sample? Would a test for bovine DNA in a pet food known to contain beef have be positive?

Can anyone shed any light on this subject?
DNA and proteins (what prions are and which are made from amino acids) are two different things. either way, extreme heat alone would not be enough to cause EITHER to break down into their individual parts (i.e. nucleic acids for DNA and amino acids for protein). thus, the DNA would still be "readable" (you could deteremine the code, or parts thereof) and be able to be 'matched' to its source.

and yes, the tests should be positive for bovine DNA if it contains beef.

back to the subject at hand, it was my understanding that it was only WET food which was contaminated anyway, and that the source of contamination was wheat gluten, not corn and not animal contents. has there been an update which changes that?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by catswym View Post

DNA and proteins (what prions are and which are made from amino acids) are two different things. either way, extreme heat alone would not be enough to cause EITHER to break down into their individual parts (i.e. nucleic acids for DNA and amino acids for protein). thus, the DNA would still be "readable" (you could deteremine the code, or parts thereof) and be able to be 'matched' to its source.

and yes, the tests should be positive for bovine DNA if it contains beef.

back to the subject at hand, it was my understanding that it was only WET food which was contaminated anyway, and that the source of contamination was wheat gluten, not corn and not animal contents. has there been an update which changes that?
Sorry for the badly worded response, I was tired when I wrote it. I mentioned prions because everyone was surprised that they could actually survive the rendering process intact, not because they were made of the same stuff as DNA. At that point I had proteins on the brain and said amino acids instead of nucleic acids when referring to DNA. I do know this stuff.. I just had a huge brain fart yesterday when I wrote that


I've been trying to find out at what temperature DNA is destroyed so that it cannot be used in testing. From what I have found, rendering heats the material to about 130C for about 2 hours. This site states:

Quote:
High temperatures (above 95° C) or steam under pressure were required to degrade the DNA completely.
I don't know how reliable that information is, as no source is provided and I have not been able to independently verify it. The site is discussing the testing of DNA in GM foods. How large of a strand of DNA would need to be intact to identify a cat or dog vs a pig or cow? Have they used this same test to test for animals that they do know are in the mixture to verify that the testing method is reliable?
 

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okay, i'm wrong about how stable DNA bonds are.

i found this paper which shows that DNA can be degraded by heat alone but...even after 3hrs at 100C, there were sill segments of DNA 128bp long. it would be my guess that fragments that long would be enough to identify species of the animal.

as for your questions of whether the researchers in question actually did postive and negative controls, i have no idea.

and as for prions, it is not that they survive "intact" as opposed to other proteins...it is that the other proteins are denatured (lose their shape) whereas, in a sense, prions are already denatured (or misfolded in a collapsed state) so heating them is not going to change that.
 

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Wow, it's amazing how starting a new Google search with slightly different search terms can yield results you weren't able to get the previous day. I did a quick search this morning and found a few relevant sites, with the most relevant being this:

http://www.tepnel.co.uk/ag_bio_and_f...ed%20meats.pdf

It does say that the tests can also be used "in the detection of rendered material of animal origin in feedstuffs as one of the measures for BSE control". It doesn't specify whether they can determine what species it is (in rendered material, at least) but I am assuming that is what they meant.
 

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Originally Posted by hollywoodveg View Post

Also Wellness, Innova, Solid Gold and Eagle Pack.
Are you saying Wellness and Innova are also being recalled? http://www.menufoods.com/recall/ has lists of the recalled foods and it doesn't list those.

I think it's the book Food Pets Die For by Ann Martin that says that there are rendered dogs and cats and roadkill in some pet foods, and it describes the methods that were used to test for it. I read the book a while back, but I'm pretty sure that's the book.
 
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