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Hi
I've joined this forum because my 15yo daughter has just pronounced that she has become vegetarian.
Of course this has caused all sorts of chaos at mealtime because I have always been a strong advocate of preparing just one meal to suit everyone to try to thrash any fussiness out of anyone, and to this point it has worked.

However, I can't and won't try to suppress or sway the opinions of an adolescent and try to respect her decision for what it is as it may just be a passing phase in her life (although not hoping so as I would like her to see at least one thing through).

Having encouraged her that such a decision should not be made lightly and that she should do some research and come up with some ideas to assist me at mealtimes, I'd like to hear from others on how they have coped with a similar situation, as I would like to help her, not hinder or dissuade her.

Here's also a bit of food for thought: There are many other consumer products whose production is associated with the death of animals, computers being one of them, and one of the many things most of us can't do without these days. My question is how do vegetarians maintain their moral stance on their decision to be a vegetarian whilst indulging in technology?
 

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Hi MotherofVeg,
I'd just like to say that i am 15 and mom doesn't approve of me being a vegetarian (she mainly complains about making more then 1 meal for the family , event though i offered to make my own veg recipes for me or the whole family) Anyways thanks for helping/respecting your daughter's decision on becoming a vegetarian. I wish my mom could help me with this transition in my life, my mom also thinks this is probably a phase but its not for me. By the way you commented on one of my post and your advice helped so thanks and i hope this helps...at least a little.
Best of luck
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotherofVeg View Post

Hi
I've joined this forum because my 15yo daughter has just pronounced that she has become vegetarian.
Of course this has caused all sorts of chaos at mealtime because I have always been a strong advocate of preparing just one meal to suit everyone to try to thrash any fussiness out of anyone, and to this point it has worked.

However, I can't and won't try to suppress or sway the opinions of an adolescent and try to respect her decision for what it is as it may just be a passing phase in her life (although not hoping so as I would like her to see at least one thing through).

Having encouraged her that such a decision should not be made lightly and that she should do some research and come up with some ideas to assist me at mealtimes, I'd like to hear from others on how they have coped with a similar situation, as I would like to help her, not hinder or dissuade her.

Here's also a bit of food for thought: There are many other consumer products whose production is associated with the death of animals, computers being one of them, and one of the many things most of us can't do without these days. My question is how do vegetarians maintain their moral stance on their decision to be a vegetarian whilst indulging in technology?
Wow! If only all parents were so supportive of their children's decisions. I suggest you tell your daughter to join veggieboards, she will get lots of help and advice with regard to living as a vegetarian, the important nutritional aspects and recipes, and she can get some new veggie friends.

As for your last question regarding computers: the definition of the label 'vegan' includes the words 'possible and practical'. Most vegans see computer use as necessary, and they see it as not possible and practical to do without. Using the same principle they deem cars and bikes as necessary (tyres are not vegan) so many vegans use those as well. The definition of what is 'possible and practical' has been debated on here quite recently - but the real answer is that every individual has their own idea of what is 'possible and practical' in their lives.

The argument over definition does not apply to vegetarians: vegetarianism is a easier definition.
"A vegetarian does not eat meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish or crustacea, or by-products of slaughter."
http://www.vegsoc.org/page.aspx?pid=508
 
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