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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I adopted a kitten a few months back from the SPCA (he's about nine months old now). He is very much litter box trained, has been since day one. The problem is that when he gets mad at me or anyone else he pees on something, usually my bed, but he's also peed on the couch, my mother chair, and the floor. Yesterday, my parent's had a party so they locked him in my room for six hours (I was in the room, avoiding drunk people), so no sooner than I fell asleep last night (this being after everyone had left, when my door was open) he pees on my bed. A week ago he did the same thing because I left for a few hours, and before that because we (me and my parents) were out in the yard for a few hours and he's not aloud outside. His cat box is clean, and he uses it every time except when he's mad at me for something. I can't just lock him out of my room at night because he'll pee on something else instead, or wait until during the day when my doors open to pee on the bed. I love my cat, but he's really pushing his luck. He is neutered, he's an only cat, and he seems to know he's not supposed to do that because he hides afterwards. Please, some advice? Anything?
 

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Bach makes something called Rescue Remedy that's supposed to help with stress.<br>
My vet recommends Feliway, but it didn't help my cat's aggressiveness very much.<br><br>
I do recommend that you talk to your vet about this. Mainly because after you've tried conventional solutions, like Bach Flower or Feliway, the vet can try different prescriptions to help Kitty settle into his new home...and not get quite so mad to begin with.<br><br>
One of my dogs peed on my bed for years. She lived in a crate, never let out, for the first six months of her life. She was pretty messed up when I adopted her.<br><br>
Go to a moving or storage place, like Public Storage or a U-haul rental place, and get a mattress bag for your size of mattress. They are WAY cheaper than water-proof mattress pads and last a lot longer. Get a few extra sets of sheets, and an extra blanket, for standby in case you have to change the sheets in a hurry.<br><br>
Another reason a mattress moving bag works better than a water-proof mattress pad is that a mattress pad has to be washed to get the pee off. The mattress bag just needs to be wiped with a washcloth, and then have fresh sheets put on top of it.<br><br>
Good luck!!!
 

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Hi HiddenMuse,<br><br>
How old are you, if you don't mind me askin? It worries me that there are parties with drunk people you have to avoid, this shouldn't be a concern for you and your animal companion. Cats are very fragile creatures and their sensitivities make it difficult to manage their behaviours. The good news is that your cat is not mad at you <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Everytime there's a change it acts as a stressor for your cat. Some cats lose fur, others scratch things, and most pee in random spots. To end this cycle of urination, it may be important for you and your family to agree to keep things stress free- no loud noises(parties), no being locked in a room, and the such. All of these situations are stressors that create anxiety and sitress for the cat, but not anger or vengefulness. Your cat needs a calming environment with consistency. That is, I'll assume the litter box was moved into the locked room for that 6 hours. No Mammal should be without a bathroom and water <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"><br><br><br>
If it continues a vet is your next best bet because frequent urination can also be a sign of an infection.<br><br>
Don't forget to wash the places the cat has urinated in a way that gets rid of the smell for the cat (they can smell things even after we clean them) and the smell makes them want to pee there again!-Google for ways to get rid of the smell to the cat. This may be very helpful.<br>
Goodluck!
 

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As others have said, he needs to be checked for a urinary tract infection, which is not only painful, but can be life threatening for a male cat.<br><br>
And if it's not triggered by a physical problem, it's still not about your cat getting "mad"; it's about your cat getting stressed, which is quite a different matter, and it's up to you and your family to keep your cat's (and your other companion animals') lives as stress free as possible.
 

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One of our cats did the same, but with poo. Turns out she was a bit mental, and was prescribed an antidepressant. She was on it for about a year, and now she's just ridiculously happy. While it would be nice to solve it without completely altering your cats' personality, it beats having to lock him up or deal with pee on your sheets for the next however many years.<br><br>
EDIT: Oh yeah, I'd forgotten about UI. My my kitty had it, and he would pee in random places. It's rather common.
 

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would definitely recommend a vet check-up to make sure it's not anything medical or anatomical and that it really is a behavior problem. Even if it is the latter, they should be able to suggest things for that too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you, I'll take him to the vet. I've had a cat with a UTI infection before and the peeing was more common and on more things (anything soft, blankets, rugs, the couch...), Phoenix (my kitten) just pees when he gets stressed. For whoever asked, I'm 21 but living with my parents because I'm in school and can't afford to live on my own. I'm use to parties, to people being over, loud noises and the sort but Phoenix can't handle it (I already knew that, he hides, or clings to me and cries). But they see him as an inconvenience, just to be thrown in my room whenever they have people over. And now that summer is here there will be more days like Yesterday to contend with. I'll check out that feline stuff that someone suggest, and see about getting a mattress bag or cover (so I can sleep on my own bed and not crash on the couch while things are being washed). I use a cat spot and odor remover that I got from petco, it seems to work.<br><br>
I'll try to get him to the vet soon, but I can't drive and the vet is 20 miles away so its difficult.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>HiddenMuse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2894094"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'll try to get him to the vet soon, but I can't drive and the vet is 20 miles away so its difficult.</div>
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In the meantime, make sure he has more water available to him than he could ever need. I put water with my cat's soft food (at the recommendation of the vet) just to give him the extra edge when it comes to his water consumption.
 

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Unfortunately, if loud noise/partying is a major stressor and is causing your kitten distress there's little you can do to change his behaviour unless you'd consider finding the kitten a good home where you know there is consistency and quiet. Not very many animals are suited for high stress environments. It's fairly doable to relax a stressed cat but when the loud noise and change in living conditions (changing rooms or available rooms=stressors for cats) continues at different times, it will cause the cat to be in constant confusion. If the cat is in your parents home and they see him as an inconvinience, and you can't easily make it to a vet, and the cat is hiding and crying...really really consider the humane thing to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I got him a collar that is supposed to relax him. Usually its just me here and things are quiet (I don't like noise myself). Its when they have parities and people over that we have problems. Most of the time his environment is pretty consistent and relaxed, unless they have people over. If the collar doesn't help than I'll get him to the vet one way or another, even if I have to pay to have someone take me there. I know he has separation anxiety, from me, but usually he sleeps on the table beside me and brings me toys so I'll play with him. I won't give him up, I will find somewhere else to live first. I've had too many pets taken from me because of my parents and I won't lose another. He has plenty of water, he likes to drink out of the dog dish but his is always full as well, and he always had food (hard food). I try to keep his environment stable, and consistant, since I need the same thing (being that I have anxiety and dissociative disorders that don't respond well to stress either), but sometimes its hard with my parent's still acting like college kids. Thank you everyone for the advice.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dreamwolf</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2894129"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Unfortunately, if loud noise/partying is a major stressor and is causing your kitten distress there's little you can do to change his behaviour unless you'd consider finding the kitten a good home where you know there is consistency and quiet. Not very many animals are suited for high stress environments. It's fairly doable to relax a stressed cat but when the loud noise and change in living conditions (changing rooms or available rooms=stressors for cats) continues at different times, it will cause the cat to be in constant confusion. If the cat is in your parents home and they see him as an inconvinience, and you can't easily make it to a vet, and the cat is hiding and crying...really really consider the humane thing to do.</div>
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It seems rather drastic to suggest rehoming the pet already. It doesn't sound like a bad environment for a cat and she's only had the cat for a few months--a cat's adjustment period is longer than that for goodness sake.<br><br>
I agree with the suggestions listed above. And I love the recommendation for getting mattress bags from a moving storage place--I need to get that just for the occasional accidents our dogs have.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>kpickell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2894434"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
It seems rather drastic to suggest rehoming the pet already. It doesn't sound like a bad environment for a cat and she's only had the cat for a few months--a cat's adjustment period is longer than that for goodness sake.<br><br>
I agree with the suggestions listed above. And I love the recommendation for getting mattress bags from a moving storage place--I need to get that just for the occasional accidents our dogs have.</div>
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I would disagree that it is drastic considering the info she has told us- She has no license to take the cat to a vet, she's in school so says she needs to live at home (a vet bill would probably be considered a huge worry for the poster if even affordable), It's her parents home and they don't even want the cat, there will be many occassions this summer with loud parties and drunk people (imagine how loud the music will be for this cat who can't escape it).<br><br><br>
This does not seem to be a well suited time for this young woman to have a pet. It is her decision in the end, and I do wish her the best of luck! It's heartbreaking to make such a choice and I would always hope there's a better option too. It's just one of the few options to take into consideration if the owner isn't in control of being able to stop the stressors and may not realistically be able to get to or afford vet services.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm not giving up the cat. I have money for a vet (I have almost six hundred in savings for emergencies, including vet bills), I can't drive because I'm blind, and parities aren't a daily thing by any means. He has been re-homed too many times (I'm the third person and the poor things still a kitten). I'm not currently in school, I go back in August, and I'm only going to be gone for five or six hours three days a week. I care far too much for Phoenix to give him to someone else and hope they take care of him, I've seen too many abused animals to ever chance that, and I've lost too many animals to be able to handle giving up another. I am perfectly capable of taking care of him, I just need to break him of peeing on my bed. Otherwise he's good. Generally no one is home but me, they only have parties once or twice a month during the summer and on holidays the rest of the year. Its just that they have loud parties with a lot of drunk people (my parent's hang around with people my age, and for some reason they all think they have to be very drunk). Most of the time is quiet, and relaxed. He always has what he needs, he has all his shots, he's treated for ticks, fleas and everything else he needs to be treated for. Re homing is not, and will never be, an option.
 

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I'm glad that you can feel confident in keeping your kitten and I'm glad you are loving him a lot. That is really important. It's stilla big concern that there's going to be periods where your cat will be exposed to really loud stimuli, and that's something you may want to try and plan to avoid somehow, or think up a creative way to get the cat away from that noise. It's also great you have a savings, just remember that at any point our animals get sick the vet bills can climb to a nice thousand dollars or two depending on what it is. Always stay prepared and plan ahead for your kitten. If the partying is the stressor perhaps on those days you can create a little den inside your closet where he can hide, as sound proof as you can make er. I don't want to seem cold to you, I'm really just trying to help and often there's harsh realities to the decisions owners need to make on behalf of their pet. If you're secure, I do wish you all the best!<br><br><br><a href="http://cats.about.com/od/healthfaqs/f/hearingsense.htm" target="_blank">http://cats.about.com/od/healthfaqs/f/hearingsense.htm</a>
 

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I'm sorry but the title made me laugh.<br><br>
Some pet stores sell sprayable liquids that smell weird and scare the cat away. You shouldn't be able to smell it, so it's safe to spray it on your bed. (You might want to smell it first just in case).
 

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I know I'm going to be repeating some advice but here goes. First step with behavioural problems is always a vet check to make sure that it is behavioural with no complicating illnesses. So, urinalysis and a physical exam +/- bloodwork. While you're there the vet can discuss environmental changes. Definitely try the Feliway, it comes in a diffuser form and you could easily plug it into a room that he'll be in. Try adding on another litterbox (or more!) in the house, it's always a good idea to have at least one more than the total number of cats in the house. So, a minimum of two for one cat spaced throughout the house. Ideally, give him some options about litterbox size and litters. Cats can be amazingly picky.<br><br>
Your vet can also discuss using medications to lower your cat's stress levels and make him less anxious. Inappropriate elimination, without physical illness, is about the stress levels your cat is under. He's not angry, he's just feeling very overwhelmed and that can lead to some odd behaviours. Medications can allow him to feel calmer and then get back on track. Depending on the cat, and the situation, it may just be a short course of meds. My Simon feels the need to pee on things when he's stressed so he's been on two short courses of Clomicalm. One when he was adjusting after we adopted a second dog and one when I had to move several times in a very short time frame. It was amazing to watch him become more confident and less anxious and hypervigilant.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Emmio</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2898353"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm sorry but the title made me laugh.</div>
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+1<br><br>
I feel bad about it but it still just invokes this giggly, immature reaction. Cat pee is gross though and I feel your pain.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Alibabble</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2898519"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I know I'm going to be repeating some advice but here goes. First step with behavioural problems is always a vet check to make sure that it is behavioural with no complicating illnesses. So, urinalysis and a physical exam +/- bloodwork. While you're there the vet can discuss environmental changes. Definitely try the Feliway, it comes in a diffuser form and you could easily plug it into a room that he'll be in. Try adding on another litterbox (or more!) in the house, it's always a good idea to have at least one more than the total number of cats in the house. So, a minimum of two for one cat spaced throughout the house. Ideally, give him some options about litterbox size and litters. Cats can be amazingly picky.<br><br>
Your vet can also discuss using medications to lower your cat's stress levels and make him less anxious. Inappropriate elimination, without physical illness, is about the stress levels your cat is under. He's not angry, he's just feeling very overwhelmed and that can lead to some odd behaviours. Medications can allow him to feel calmer and then get back on track. Depending on the cat, and the situation, it may just be a short course of meds. My Simon feels the need to pee on things when he's stressed so he's been on two short courses of Clomicalm. One when he was adjusting after we adopted a second dog and one when I had to move several times in a very short time frame. It was amazing to watch him become more confident and less anxious and hypervigilant.</div>
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+1 on all points.
 
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