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This might be a silly question, but I've never done it! S/o and I are very tight on cash and it costs us $4.75 Canadian for each load of laundry (wash and dry). We currently don't even have grocery money, and I'm running out of clean clothes! I was wondering if I could wash the laundry by hand in the bathtub, and how one would go about doing so?<br><br><br><br>
Also any other money-saving tips are appreciated!
 

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Wow, you have my sympathy! I can't imagine having to wash clothes by hand. Mainly because I would have trouble wringing them out afterward to get most of the water out of them, especially bulky items like towels and jeans!
 

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Yes you can wash clothes in your bath tub, tho a laundry tub would make the job easier. You can even use a kitchen sink. Actually, soap or detergent is not absolutely necessary. Most body soil and earth soil comes out with plain water. For oil and grease you will need a soap or detergent.
 

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The trick is supposed to be to allow the clothes to soak a good long time in the soapy water, this eliminates the need to swish them around a lot (what our washers do and what people used to do by rubbing clothes on a clothes board or rock, which is actually really bad for them and wears them out). So, soak overnight if you can.<br><br><br><br>
I used to do all my laundry by hand, years ago, when I lived in a house without a laundry room.
 

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Me and my sister did this for atleast 6 months when we lived on our own. I've been in your predicament before.<br><br><br><br>
Fill bath tub half way with desired water, add a cap of detergent. Now, use something (spatula) to get some bubbles.<br><br><br><br>
We would then dump a load at a time into the water,Of course allow them to soak about an hour or two and I used to hike up my pants or shorts and pound my feet on them. Like making wine! We used a wooden clothes dryer to hang them up on after draining the tub. A good trick is after draining, pile it all up into a corner and stand with clean bare feet ontop of the pile to push the water out. DON'T FALL. Or you can use plastic hangers and hang it from the shower curtain rod. Just undo the shower curtain in the center and leave the very ends attached. This allows it to hang and catch the water and then funnel it to the bathtub. If you don't want to do that, take some towels and after wringing your clothes super good, lay them on a few towels and roll then step all over them Pretend your pressing tofu. LOL When doing this method, all you have to do is hang and place a good fan on them to dry.<br><br><br><br>
We would scrub our clothes with a plastic washboard.<br><br><br><br>
If I ever go move out again, I will probably do this way for the money saved factor.<br><br><br><br>
Doing laundry by hand is a great everyday workout. Believe me, do it everynight, allow to dry overnight. If you wait till everything is dirty... its extremely exhausting. Especially wringing out the towels. I recommend wearing maybe 2 outfits during the week and washing them at night. That saves on laundry if you know what your gonna wear.<br><br><br><br>
For stains, scrub hard. lol Try using a little nail brush to help get stains scrubbed out.<br><br><br><br>
Don't worry. It's worth all the hardwork. It builds character. Millions probably still do their laundry by hand.<br><br><br><br>
GOOD LUCK<br><br><br><br>
ADD: Unless you have a super dirty job, jeans can be washed once a week. Or whenever they are dirty.
 

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Err, I don't know if GanyGreenBean though it was too obvious to need mentioning, or she wasn't aware of it, but his instructions, detailed as they are, nevertheless don't include instructions to do a "rinse cycle" as well as a wash cycle.<br><br><br><br>
A good technique for soil removal, in addition to those GanyGreenB and Ludi mentioned, is simply to fold over a piece of clothing and rub one side against the other side.<br><br><br><br>
The hardest part is "wringing dry." If you totally drip dry drying can take quite awhile. That said, 100% cotton takes about 3 times as long to dry as a 50-50 cotton poly blend, and all poly dries in no time. If you do a fair job of wringing, heavy all-cotton items, such as heavy-weight denim jeans, can take a couple of days to dry indoor. If you can dry outdoors in the sunlight, it will not only go faster, but the sunlight is a micro-organism ecology-fixer and reduces your need for soap, and for odor removers such as borax or washing soda. Clothes smell much better when dried in sunlight.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>soilman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Err, I don't know if GanyGreenBean though it was too obvious to need mentioning, or she wasn't aware of it, but his instructions, detailed as they are, nevertheless don't include instructions to do a "rinse cycle" as well as a wash cycle.<br><br><br><br>
A good technique for soil removal, in addition to those GanyGreenB and Ludi mentioned, is simply to fold over a piece of clothing and rub one side against the other side.<br><br><br><br>
The hardest part is "wringing dry." If you totally drip dry drying can take quite awhile. That said, 100% cotton takes about 3 times as long to dry as a 50-50 cotton poly blend, and all poly dries in no time. If you do a fair job of wringing, heavy all-cotton items, such as heavy-weight denim jeans, can take a couple of days to dry indoor. If you can dry outdoors in the sunlight, it will not only go faster, but the sunlight is a micro-organism ecology-fixer and reduces your need for soap, and for odor removers such as borax or washing soda. Clothes smell much better when dried in sunlight.</div>
</div>
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We didn't rinse.. well unless you count draining the tub and allowing the shower water hit it for a few minutes. LOL<br><br><br><br>
I haven't done it in quite a while. Although, I don't miss it.
 

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Some of my clothes are handwash only, so it's something I have to do now and again. You can use machine detergent, or buy special handwashing detergent. I usually use the sink to wash in as it's the right height. To clean and rinse clothes, I knead them as if kneading dough, and also rub dirty areas together as soilman suggested.<br><br><br><br>
I always rinse carefully. It's annoying, but it stops your skin getting irritated by the detergent.<br><br><br><br>
You can save money washing clothes by using far less detergent than the package suggests, or even none at all for many washes (in machines). I only use the dryer for sheets and other large items as it's quite wasteful of energy and money.
 

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"some of my clothes are HandWash Only"<br><br><br><br>
Most washing machines produced after 1960 have a "delicate" cycle about which, in the users manual for the machine, they swear up and down will "treat your handwashables as gently as hand washing."
 

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I once saw an ad in one of those mail order magazines for some sort of "washing machine" that you put in the back of your car. Supposedly, the stopping and starting and turning that you normally do while driving would slosh the water around enough to "wash" you clothes by the end of the day. But I suppose you could try this with any large plastic container that had a top or lid.<br><br><br><br>
I've also seen an ad for a "mini" washer that you would plug in and it would do your wash in 15 minutes. It cost something like $75. I don't know how good it is.<br><br><br><br>
I guess I've always taken having a washing machine and dryer for granted, or having enough money as a student to put in the coin slots of commercial machines.<br><br><br><br>
Soilman is correct that much of the benefit of using a washing machine simply comes from the rinsing and agitation of the water in the machine. The soap/detergent is almost incidental for most items.<br><br><br><br>
I've never tried this myself, but if I had to do my laundry by hand, and after I had rinsed and wrung out my small items, I might be tempted to put them in a salad spinner to spin out as much of the water as I could before hanging them up to dry.
 

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Just an idea, but do you have any neighbours, friends or family that would let you use their washing machine? Even if it is just once in a while. Maybe you could offer to do some chores or something in exchange.<br><br><br><br>
I'd also be inclined to change out of "good" clothes into comfy stuff when I got home. If you hang and air them, they'll probably last a little longer between wearings.
 

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All my clothes with "hand wash" on I just put in with a normal wash, nothings desintegrated yet!<br><br><br><br>
Anyhoo<br><br>
When i first came to uni had to hand wash for 2 months. Did it in little lots in the kitchen sink.
 

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Thrift stores may have relatively cheap washers.<br><br><br><br>
I think mine ran $50. The dryer was another $50.
 

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Traveler's trick: take a shower with your clothes on. I'm serious, but I'll explain. The reason clothes generally get cleaner in a washing machine is the agitation. I've traveled to third world countries where there was no choice other than to hand wash. To save time, just take your clothes into the shower with you, pour some soap or detergent on them and stomp on them with your feet a bit. Then, while you have conditioner on your hair, just rinse out the clothes. When you're done with the shower, wring out the clothes and hang them up. This is a long-standing traveler's trick that really does work! And, of course, if you need something quickly, then after washing, roll it up in a towel to soak up all extra moisture that you can. In the morning, if you really need the item (especially if it's "that" time of month, and your underwear supply is limited) and it isn't quite dry, just zap it a few minutes with a hair dryer.
 

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I think that some things are easier to hand wash than others. You may want to hand wash things like underwear, tshirts and undershirts, and other "light" clothing, and then hang them to try. The "heavier" clothing, like jeans and sweatshirts, have a go in the washer at the laundromat, then hang them dry instead of using the drier. I don't know how they work there, but the driers at the laundromats here do like 8-10 minutes per $.25, so you could get them to "damp" for a $.25 then hang them to dry after that.<br><br><br><br>
You may want to look into buying detergent for hand washables, as it would probably rinse better than the stuff for the washing machines.<br><br><br><br>
They do also make "table top" washing machines, that don't wash very much... but its a thought, though the upfront cost would be more.<br><br><br><br>
ETA: Something like this <a href="http://www.ekitchengadgets.com/etwowa40.html?ManufacturerId=39-4034&002=74" target="_blank">http://www.ekitchengadgets.com/etwow...39-4034&002=74</a> or this <a href="http://www.laundry-alternative.com/small_washing_machine.htm" target="_blank">http://www.laundry-alternative.com/s...ng_machine.htm</a><br><br>
They're really not too expensive...
 

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i lived on the road for years & we used a 5 gal bucket, with "slosh room" and left it in the back of the car as we drove (agitation, and we were on some really bad roads) we'd rinse when we'd get back and put them on a rack or line.<br><br>
I think we usually had the bucket 3/4 full, and that included the water and a bit of soap/detergent.<br><br><br><br>
I'd think the same idea could be done with a 2 gal bucket that you simply shake.<br><br>
(upper body workout alert)<br><br><br><br>
I also use the bathtub and stomp on the clothes.
 

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This is an interesting thread. I have a question.<br><br><br><br>
In terms of water used + electricity, how much difference could it make for the environment if you switched from machine washing to hand-washing?
 

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I washed everything by hand for about six months. I stopped in the end because of the amount of time it was taking to get things dry. It was Ok in the summer but in the winter, items like jeans were taking 4 or 5 days to dry. The other problem was the amount of condensation from the washing process. Nice idea but from my experience massively time consuming and clothes which were only ever half clean. Two essential ingrediants to hand washing I discovered were a warm dry climate and not much else to do than dry clothes and look out for rain.
 
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