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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
all my stuff is really starting to grow but....how do i know when i need to transplant to a bigger container? Also do my zucchini or green beans need to be staked? i know my tomatoes will eventually but what about the others ( i've got green beans, zucchini, cukes, bell peppers and broccoli)
 

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I think cucs can grow along the ground in a 'patch'. You're tomatoes will need supports. I don't think my aunt stakes her green beans either. My bell peppers also needed supports once they got to about two feet...otherwise a good squal will knock them right over.

B
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ok..thanks. my zucchini is about a foot tall...no flowers yet though. my maters are only about 2 inches tall but they have a long grow season here in FL so...i'm not too worried.
 

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I'd go ahead and stake the tomatoes now. It's best to put the stakes in the ground right away, even if you don't tie the tomatoes up to them. That way, you don't jam the stake into the plant's roots.

It sounds like you have a good garden! We just ate the first bell pepper from our little garden last night. Yum!


Keep us posted on the garden--I love living vicariously.
 

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There is no reason to stake brocolli.

I grow even certain indeterminate varieties (varieties that spread out and up more) of tomato w/o staking them. I may pile a little brush underneath to keep the fruits off the ground.

Neither zuchini nor cucumber need staking, but you can save garden area by trellising them, so that the plants grow up, instead of spreading out along the ground. Stakes won't be sufficient generally.

For green beans, it depends on the cultivar. Some are called "bush" cultivars and don't need staking. Climbing cultivars will need either trellising or staking.
 

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Didn't you ever hear of Jack and the beanstalk? That was a climbing cultivar. This was the original condition of beans. Modern agriculturalists breeded and breeded until they got cultivars that grew in small discreet bushes that machinery could get next to without getting tangled in the plants, and that had all their beens be at the same state of maturity at the same time -- ripen on the same day and all be picked, by machine, on the same day. Great for machine picking or even mass-production hand picking -- all the plants planted on one day could all be picked, completely, on one day.

Most backyard gardeners would prefer climbing variieties that also have each plant continuously produce pickable beans over the course of about 3 weeks. So you can pick some ripe beans every day, for 3 weeks. You have to pick at least every other day or every 3 days, or they'll get overripe.
 

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Sandimac, you don't want you plants to get root bound...where the roots get all bound up from being in to small a container. I think that a bit after you see the root come out the bottom of the container...its time to put them in something bigger. I don't know how small a container you started them in? If it is big enough you may not have to move them?? What did you start them in???
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i started most of them in a 4.5 inch pot. my maters is in a smaller one cause it was all i had. i have a bunch more pots so i think i'm going to do alot of repotting this weekend. so far everyone seems all nice and happy...especially the herbs that were rescued from the grocery store......my basil almost doubled in size once i took it home and repotted it.
 
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