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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know, I know. It's the cliche we all hate. "Durrr, where do you get your protein?"<br><br>
I am very familiar with protein sources and eat a variety of protein dense foods. Even so I am finding it very difficult to meet my daily requirements without going over the number of calories I want to eat for the day. I know there are vegan bodybuilders that use protein supplements but I am not very familiar with these and their applications for the average person. I am certainly not a bodybuilder. Just wondering if anyone uses something like this or are there other options out there where I can get a lot protein without having to eat so much?
 

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If you are eating a healthy, balanced vegan (or near-vegan -- I know you said you're not quite there yet) diet, you should be getting plenty of protein. I don't supplement with protein powder or anything like that and I definitely get enough. For example, here's what I ate yesterday -- a reasonably balanced day for me, but definitely not a day where I concentrated like crazy on protein sources:<br><br>
B: whole wheat bagel with PB&J and sliced banana, pint of chocolate soymilk<br><br>
L: ½ veggie/hummus sandwich and cup of black bean soup<br><br>
S: 1 chocolate raspberry cookie<br><br><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';"><span style="font-family:Verdana;">D: salad, bread, whole wheat pizza with peppers, mushrooms, onion, spinach and broccoli</span></span><br><br><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';"><span style="font-family:Verdana;">When I added up the amount of protein in all this food, at least as near as I could figure, I came up with 54 grams, which is definitely enough for a woman my size. In fact, I just did the math and it's MORE than the RDA for my body weight, which would be about 50 grams a day (using the RDA of .8 grams per kilogram of body weight.)</span></span><br><br><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';"><span style="font-family:Verdana;">I'm saying this not to babble on about myself, but just to make sure you're understanding protein requirements correctly. It really shouldn't be a concern if you eat plenty of protein-dense foods (whole grains, nuts, legumes, soy etc.), which you say you do. I'm wondering how much you're getting, what you're eating, and how much you think you need?</span></span>
 

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I find seitan is a really good way to get a lot of protein with relatively low fat and carbs. <a href="http://vegandad.blogspot.com/2008/03/homemade-sausages.html" target="_blank">Vegan Dad's sausages</a> are wonderful.<br><br>
On days when I've done a hard workout (for me, two hours of krav maga) I use hemp powder to create a protein shake.<br><br>
You can see what I eat <a href="http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/diary/Barelmy" target="_blank">here</a>. I haven't been brilliant over the last few days, but I generally get between 43g-63g of protein - ie, 0.8 x my bodyweight in kilograms to half my bodyweight in pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Based on the formula I found on Vegan Health and other sites I should be getting roughly 80 grams of protein a day. Once I am at my ideal body weight this number will be closer to 60. I've been keeping pretty accurate records of my eating habits lately and have been getting in the 70+ range but I also end up about 400-500 calories higher than I would like.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dividedsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855035"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I am very familiar with protein sources and eat a variety of protein dense foods.</div>
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I don't get why you're asking this? If you're familiar with these sources of protein, why are you asking us where you can get a lot of protein without having to eat so much? Wouldn't you know that already?
 

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How much are you aiming for your daily calorie intake to be?<br><br>
Lentils have around 26g protein per 350 cals (100g)<br>
Quinoa has around 14g protein per 370 cals (100g)<br>
Low fat humous (obviously dependent on the brand) has around 10g protein per 200 cals<br>
Soya milk (dependent on brand) has approx 10g protein per 140 cals (250 ml)<br>
Oats have around 18g protein per 400 cals (100g)<br>
Spinach has around 4g protein per 28 cals (120g)<br>
Broccoli has about 9g protein per 100 cals (280g)<br><br>
I would say it would be quite easy to get 80g protein and stay under 2000 cal. The key would be lots of veg and wholefoods and avoid processed foods that are calorie rich and nutrient low.<br><br>
Eg I'm no nutritional expert but something that might get you the calorie/ protein ratio you want:<br><br>
Breakfast: Oatmeal with soya milk and 17g ground flaxseed (90 cals, 3g protein)<br>
Lunch: Sandwich- 2 Slices wholemeal Bread (120 cals, 5g protein) with grated carrot, spinach, and low fat humous<br>
Dinner: Spicy tomato lentil stew with broccoli and quinoa<br><br><br>
Snacks: banana, Chopped red pepper, chopped cucumber, 25g raisins<br><br>
The extra fruits and vegs should not add too many cals and will add a gram or two of protein here and there.
 

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Whole proteins are fairly easy to get, too. Baked beans (<a href="http://vegan20eleven.blogspot.com/2011/01/baked-beans-on-toast.html" target="_blank">homemade</a>, much more special and delicious than tinned - plus, you can add flaxseed for good fats and extra protein) on wholegrain toast or peanut butter on toast, or soy milk, or hemp powder, for instance.
 

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I agree with Lucky Charm... if you're eating whole foods and avoiding empty calories it seems like it wouldn't be hard to get to 80 grams.<br>
Eating whole grains is especially helpful -- if you always (or at least nearly always) choose whole grains over refined you'll find that boosts your protein intake a lot. Almost half my daily protein intake comes from grains.
 

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I'd be curious how many calories you're eating per day. I get about 70 g./per just eating fruit and vegetables, about 3,000 calories.
 

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If you're eating a healthy balanced diet it is very hard to not get enough protein. Those formulas are just a guideline to a suggested amount of protein. You aren't going to be healthy at 80 grams a day and deficient if you only get 79. The 70+ range is plenty and you are probably getting more than you think.<br>
I wouldn't use any of those protein supplements meant for bodybuilders. Too much protein can cause low calcium and bodybuilders usually have to take a calcium supplement if they are on a high protein diet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Nishani</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855290"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't get why you're asking this? If you're familiar with these sources of protein, why are you asking us where you can get a lot of protein without having to eat so much? Wouldn't you know that already?</div>
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From my original post: I am very familiar with protein sources and eat a variety of protein dense foods. <i>Even so I am finding it very difficult to meet my daily requirements without going over the number of calories I want to eat for the day.</i><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>lucky_charm</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855298"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
How much are you aiming for your daily calorie intake to be?<br><br>
Lentils have around 26g protein per 350 cals (100g)<br>
Quinoa has around 14g protein per 370 cals (100g)<br>
Low fat humous (obviously dependent on the brand) has around 10g protein per 200 cals<br>
Soya milk (dependent on brand) has approx 10g protein per 140 cals (250 ml)<br>
Oats have around 18g protein per 400 cals (100g)<br>
Spinach has around 4g protein per 28 cals (120g)<br>
Broccoli has about 9g protein per 100 cals (280g)<br><br>
I would say it would be quite easy to get 80g protein and stay under 2000 cal. The key would be lots of veg and wholefoods and avoid processed foods that are calorie rich and nutrient low.</div>
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I am staying under 2000 calories but I'd like to be closer to 1500.<br><br>
I feel like once I reach my weight loss goals it will be easier because I won't need as much protein but right now it's somewhat of a balancing act. I'm definitely eating some things that don't have the best protein to calorie ratios but I'm not trying to live on proteins alone. I'll try to incorporate some of the suggestions in this thread. Thanks for (most of) the replies.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dividedsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855187"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Based on the formula I found on Vegan Health and other sites I should be getting roughly 80 grams of protein a day. Once I am at my ideal body weight this number will be closer to 60. I've been keeping pretty accurate records of my eating habits lately and have been getting in the 70+ range but I also end up about 400-500 calories higher than I would like.</div>
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Heya, I'm no nutritionst...but I wonder if the ways of finding how many grams of protein you should eat per day is based on the assumption you're eating enough calories to maintain weight? IE: maybe you need less than 80g since you're eating less calories than needed to maintain weight, so if the same proportion of your food is protein but in grams it's less. Like I said I don't know but that just came to mind.<br><br>
Really though, I think if you're eating enough and being concious to eat high-protein foods at most meals you shouldn't need to worry. Nutritionism isn't an exact science, and if you're eating a healthy, varied diet with lots of fresh food and wholegrains (and a b12 suppliment!) ... I'm not expert to say this but I think you'll be just fine.
 

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I'm no nutritionist either, but I wonder if maybe you have misunderstood the recommendation slightly. Since you're trying to lose weight I'm assuming that means you are currently overweight. From veganhealth.org:
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">The RDA for protein is supposed to cover the needs of 97 to 98% of the population. It is currently set at .80 grams per kilogram of <b>healthy</b> body weight per day.</div>
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(My emphasis.) So apparently you should be going by your <i>ideal</i> weight instead of your <i>current</i> weight. After all, much of the proteins we eat goes to maintain muscle mass, so it only makes sense that overweight people (whose extra weight usually comes mostly from fat) would need less protein per body weight than people in the normal range.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Indian Summer</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855563"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm no nutritionist either, but I wonder if maybe you have misunderstood the recommendation slightly. Since you're trying to lose weight I'm assuming that means you are currently overweight. From veganhealth.org: (My emphasis.) So apparently you should be going by your <i>ideal</i> weight instead of your <i>current</i> weight. After all, much of the proteins we eat goes to maintain muscle mass, so it only makes sense that overweight people (whose extra weight usually comes mostly from fat) would need less protein per body weight than people in the normal range.</div>
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This is how I understand also, but I'm no nutritionist either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That does make sense. Thanks guys.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dividedsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855501"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
From my original post: I am very familiar with protein sources and eat a variety of protein dense foods. <i>Even so I am finding it very difficult to meet my daily requirements without going over the number of calories I want to eat for the day.</i><br><br><br><br>
I am staying under 2000 calories but I'd like to be closer to 1500.<br></div>
</div>
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Are you aware what starving your body of 500-700 cals per day will do to your body in the long run?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Nishani</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855607"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Are you aware what starving your body of 500-700 cals per day will do to your body in the long run?</div>
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I'm not "starving my body". I'm not an athlete. I'm not out burning up a ton of calories every day. I've done the math. I know what it takes to maintain my weight and what it takes to lose. I've lost over 100 pounds since 2007. I'm doing fine, thanks.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Nishani</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855607"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Are you aware what starving your body of 500-700 cals per day will do to your body in the long run?</div>
</div>
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1500 calories a day is not "starving." It's a perfectly reasonable number for weight loss.
 

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Most reasonable diets I've seen suggest from 1200 - 2000 calories depending on a few factors. Even on the biggest loser ( I know it's a TV show, but still) most of them are on about 2000 calories a day and they are doing training at a pro athlete level. So 1500 is a reasonable amount.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>whisper</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855870"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Even on the biggest loser ( I know it's a TV show, but still) most of them are on about 2000 calories a day and they are doing training at a pro athlete level.</div>
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That is a REALLY irresponsible amd unethical show. They're going for short-term results for ratings, they don't care about the contestants long-term health.<br><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dividedsky</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2855627"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm not "starving my body". I'm not an athlete. I'm not out burning up a ton of calories every day. I've done the math. I know what it takes to maintain my weight and what it takes to lose. I've lost over 100 pounds since 2007. I'm doing fine, thanks.</div>
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Women need at least 2,000 cals per day. If you're not meeting that requirement you most certainly are starving your body of what it needs to function properly and remain healthy.<br><br>
Living on 1,500 cals will certainly achieve weight loss now, but it's not very sensible because it comes at a cost to your health. Not only will you NOT getting the proper nutrition you need which puts you at risk for the disease process to begin in your body, but you are also messing with your basil metabolic rate (BMR). When you restrict calories your BMR begins to slow as a compensatory measure to conserve calories, and that is your enemy for weight loss in the long run as your BMR is one of the factors that controls the amount of calories you burn in your body.<br><br><br>
Can I suggest that you do yourself a favour Dividedsky and give up this old-school "dieting" of restricting calories cos it's all been debunked by the medical profession as having a negative impact on your body, and you're probably going to regret it in the future. The key to losing weight and keeping it off for good is to just eat sensibly and do some regular exercise that you can sustain for the rest of your life. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rockon.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rockon:">
 
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