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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hoshino Tsunehiko, Jack Kerouac and Cor van den Heuvel are three high-profile poets whose haiku do not follow the customary seventeen syllable rule when written up in English. I don't bother with a seventeen syllable rule when writing up my haiku in English either. Here's why:

"Trying to write haiku in seventeen syllables in English often results in using unnecessary words to fill out the count. Such words will destroy a haiku, which depends on concision and suggestibility for its effect. [The Japanese count syllables differently than we do --- they count shorter elements, onji, as 'syllables.' The word 'haiku,' for example, is three onji, while we count it as two syllables. Ten to fourteen syllables equal the time duration of seventeen Japanese onji.]" -- excerpt from pages xv & xvi of Baseball Haiku THE BEST HAIKU EVER WRITTEN ABOUT THE GAME, edited by Nanae Tamura and Cor van den Heuvel

Examples:

my son runs toward
the budding tree ---
their first base

by Hoshino Tsunehiko, director of the International Division for the Museum of Haiku Literature in Tokyo and leader of the haiku group Ten (Marten)

Empty baseball field
--- A robin
Hops along the bench

by Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), king of the Beats

the geese have gone ----
in the chilly twilight
empty milkweed pods

by Cor van den Heuvel, American haiku poet

gulls asquawkin'
--- early morning row
disturbs my slumber

by Gerrit Jonker, that's me -- :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The toad! It looks like
it could belch
a cloud.

-- Kobayashi Issa (1763-1828),
Japanese poet & lay Buddhist priest
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That wren --
looking here, looking there.
You lose something?

-- Kobayashi Issa
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
fallen autumn leaves
- blue jay flips one
finds hidden peanut

-- Ger Jonker
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
cross squirrel
chatters --- lineman
continues working

-- Ger Jonker
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After supper
on crossed paws,
The cat meditates

-- Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), king of the Beats
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
more rain
the cat and I
talk things over

-- Joseph Robello
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
already seen
the dog waits for the postman
at the fence gate

-- Slobodan Pupovac, Croatia
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
sap moon
stepping in moose tracks
to stay on the trail

-- Kristen Lindquist
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
clearing sky
a salmon falls back
into the roar

-- Chuck Brickley, USA
 
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Writing truly tradition haiku is hardly easy. I have written some 17 syllable poems, but they really are not proper haiku.

I guess that is the point....it is a challenge to try and write in that form. Also, though, the Japanese language is very very much geared to writing in that style, far more than English / Germanic languages, or even Romance languages.

some links:


Classic Japanese Haiku

Japanese Haiku, translated by Peter Beilenson [1955], from Peter Pauper Press book. Truly excellent translation.

Japanese Haiku: Part 1
https://www.sacred-texts.com/shi/jh/jh02.htm
Includes this one by Basho:

Must Springtime Fade?
Then Cry All Birds
And Fishes Cold Pale Eyes Pour Tears

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Jack Kerouac - reading his American Haiku

With accompaniment by jazz saxophonists Al Cohn and Zoot Sims

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJdxJ5llh5A
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Chinese Poems - Good Collection

This site presents Chinese, pinyin and English texts of poems by some of the greatest Chinese poets. Most of the featured authors are from the Tang dynasty, when culture in China was at its peak, but writers from other periods are also included.

Chinese Poems
http://www.chinese-poems.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

from the book Zen Flesh, Zen Bones...

Zen Anecdotes


88. How to Write a Chinese Poem

A well-known Japanese poet was asked how to compose a Chinese poem.
“The usual Chinese poem is four lines,” he explains. “The first line contains the initial phase; the second line, the continuation of that phase; the third line turns from this subject and begins a new one; and the fourth line brings the first three lines together. A popular Japanese song illustrates this:
Two daughters of a silk merchant live in Kyoto.
The elder is twenty, the younger, eighteen.
A soldier may kill with his sword.
But these girls slay men with their eyes.




to me, that is the real "hook" of a haiku...if you can create a set up like that and just completely deliver in the closing line.

But, at least to me, that is extremely difficult. I have rarely seen people hit that kind of mark. Fun to try though....
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
perched on ledges
erudite pigeons
recite high coo --- :)

-- CoffeehousePoet
 

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If you like comedy haiku, these are fun:

Zombie Haiku

+++++++++++


I think pretty much everyone who has written haiku has written a few comedy ones. Of course, if all people do is mock haiku, I don’t see much point in that.

I remember seeing a video of a Horowitz concert, with some huge Russian guy in the audience, just balling his eyes out at how beautiful the music was (I think it was some Beethoven).

I think some folks so inculcate superficial behavior into their minds and hearts that they lose any real sensitivity….also known as “life.” Just become some kind of lunatic jester…as if that is all that life could possibly be. Quite sad…

And then into the callously vindictive behavior…some kind of psychotic festival of ego competition, even with people who are not competing with anyone…about anything. And all that is really just brainwashing one’s own mind towards becoming a sociopath.

Guess what? We all lose! Yippie! Again, like the behavior of a psychotic 5 year old…just gleefully destroying everything….as if that is the be all and end all of life. Just throwing away gold and diamonds to sit in a pig sty and play with the mud…fully convinced that they are the geniuses and people who don't want to play in pig sty mud are lunatics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've featured quite a few haiku on this thread that were penned by high-profile poets (Kobayashi Issa, Hoshino Tsunehiko, Cor van den Heuvel, Jack Kerouac). I've also featured poets who've had their haiku published somewhere on-line by a poetry group. I, myself, have had only one haiku published by a poetry group so far. Anyway, when I started this thread, I was hoping others would post animal-themed haiku as well.

If you don't like a haiku, then just ignore it. Don't be a troll. If you do like it, then why not give it a "Like."


living room window ---
the bird looks at me
from the lawn

-- Ger Jonker,
published March 2022 in Espacio LUNA ALFANJE

www.facebook.com/photo?fbid=1341642569668691&set=a122288488270778
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Haiku, written up in English, should not be made up of 17 syllables --- imo. Still, I love this little 3-liner.


one tiny feather
all the colours of the bird
weightless on my palm

-- Beverly George
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
high ambitions...
chinstrap penguins
build upon their nest

-- Richard Thomas
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
late October ---
squirrels in the park
"trick or treat"

-- Ger Jonker
 
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