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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here had the chance to read, "Fast Food Nation"?

I read the entire book in a couple hours when I was in bed the whole day sick this past weekend.

What the heck is stinkeye!?
 

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Read it - for the type of book it is....it's good reading.

I think of this book as good transition material. I have two dog-eared copies I give to omni people "here, check this out - but give it back". They see the title and read it (other Excellent books like Vegan: The Ethics of Eating or Animal Liberation turn people off by the title.....too much too soon).
 

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well, it was way too expensive even on half.com! ($8 for a book!) but it looks like my library has a copy, so I'll look into it next time I'm downtown. Lots of people here have recommended it. (And I eat a lot of fast food.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The book was really more than I expected from the title. It not only talks about how animals are mistreated and seen as a commodity to be mass produced as quickly and cheaply as possible, but the effect this has on workers and society in general. There is also a great deal of focus on the economics of it all and the effects huge franchises like McDonalds have.
 

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im finished. im sending it to my fave human pal who is also part of our VB cult. if i ever get get off my ass and buy stamps.

maybe he will send it to you kpickell. pm me if you want it and i'll make him.

you look like Rusty, the cat i am taking care of for a bit. hopefully you are nicer and less stinky. no i shouldnt say that. Rusty is a down dude.
 

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I read it a while back, too. Actually, they have a couple of books that you can read while waiting for your food at Native Foods in Westwood, which is kinda cool. I read it over the course of several meals there. I'd already been vegan for several months, so I was more interested in it for the historical perspective than any insights he shared about the meat industry, which I'd already learned a lot about up to that point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
hey! I have it too, my parents actually bought it for me as a JOKE...but I read the first page and as I am not a big reader (I get bored of reading easily) I stopped...so maybe I'll give it a go since I am now off for the summer and mega bored!

Is it actually good? what exactly is it about..I mean what does the writer say..roughly?
 

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I read it and LOVED it! I especially liked how it went into the mistreatment of workers in fast food restaurants and meat packing plants. So often I forget that the meat industry isn't only bad for the cows, pigs, and chickens. The repetitive motion injuries sound awful often times, packing plants don't have the best benefits (I know--I used to work for a consulting firm that set up benefit plans for several meat packing/processing plants).

I also loved the section on the flavoring companies--that part was so surreal and so fascinating.

Highly recommended!!
 

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I read this book about 2 months ago and LOVED it. Like muppetcow, I was also really impacted by the information provided on the people who work in the meat industry; it's not just the animals suffering.

I had been waffling on some issues prior to reading this book, but after reading it my veg*nism is now iron-clad. The book is a fascinating read - I learned so much.
 

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FFN did not strike me as a particularly "vegan" book. The last chapter (or maybe it was an epilog) told of a restaurant in Colorado that served clean meat and paid a living wage with benefits to its employees. The book is about the trickle down effect on the health, economy, and agribusiness of the US. The book is not even close to being a dry read of facts as my last sentence might imply. It is about the people who give everything they have in good faith to earn a living and end up being treated as disposable goods. It gives a picture of the problems Latinos have trying to earn their way out of poverty in America and how they often end up as little more then slave labor to serve the fast-food machine. The mistreatment of animals is an issue, the abuse of the land is looked at, the American love of grease and its poor health, even some welfare issues are looked at. The fast food industry is benefited by the perpetuation of these abuses.

I do not remember a dry chapter in this well written book. The Author is a writer for a top-notch magazine and it shows in the writing and research.

Good follow-up reading (Ill be looking for epskis book to add to my list)

Mad Cowboy by Howard Lyman

Nickel and Dimed [subtitled: On (Not) Getting By in America] by Barbara Erenreich
 

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I think the most memorable fact in that book for me was that there's more fecal matter to be found in the average american sink(due to contaminated meat that's been washed in it) than there is on the average american toilet seat. So technically, you'd be better off eating a carrot that fell in your toilet than one that fell into your sink.

Eew *spew*
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Kamila

Good follow-up reading (Ill be looking for epskis book to add to my list)
You might be waiting a while. My screenwriting takes priority over my nonfiction, and I have a number of projects backed up on my desk... But I will certainly announce any movement on that book here before anywhere else.
 

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I read that during my transitional period. It was very inspiring for me at that poing. I also read Mad Cowboy, I think someone else listed, which is very interesting. And now I'm reading Food Revolution by John Robbins. It's pretty good. I haven't read the whole thing just skimmed and reread certain parts that appealed to me. It has a lot of good statistics and info.
 
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