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<a href="http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/07/30/1059480410060.html" target="_blank">http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/...480410060.html</a><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><b>Good news from ozone layer<br><br>
By Deborah Smith, Science Writer<br><br>
July 31 2003<br><br><br><br>
The hole in the ozone layer can be seen in the dark-blue areas in this image of Earth, but the problem appears to be easing in the upper stratosphere.<br><br><br><br>
Ozone destruction in the upper atmosphere has begun to slow - a first sign that the international ban on emissions of chlorofluorocarbons is working.<br><br><br><br>
The good news for the protective ozone layer was discovered by researchers analysing measurements made by three NASA satellites over the past 20 years.<br><br><br><br>
The team leader, Michael Newchurch, of the University of Alabama, said the recent changes they had observed were small but important. "This is the beginning of a recovery of the ozone layer. We had a monumental problem of global scale that we have started to resolve."<br><br><br><br>
He said the findings, to be published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, meant the ban on CFCs and other halogenated hydrocarbons should continue.<br><br><br><br>
Scientists had known from research in Australia and overseas that phasing out these chemicals from 1989 had already led to a slowdown in the accumulation of chlorine in the atmosphere. But the satellite study is the first to observe an associated reduction in ozone depletion.<br><br><br><br>
Professor Newchurch cautioned in a statement that this beneficial effect was restricted so far to the upper stratosphere, a layer between 35 and 45 kilometres above the Earth, where there is not a lot of ozone.<br><br><br><br>
"We don't see compelling evidence that the destruction of ozone is slowing in the lower stratosphere [20 to 35 kilometres up], where 80 per cent of the protective ozone layer exists," he said. It would take decades for the layer, which protects us from the sun's ultraviolet light, to be fully restored.<br><br><br><br>
The study was only possible because the satellites were able to detect one ozone molecule among a million air molecules, he said. Their "capability to do it consistently for 20 years without human intervention is absolutely astounding".<br><br><br><br>
Monitoring needed to continue. "We are not out of the woods yet. We have been surprised before by atmospheric changes and must continue to carefully measure our atmosphere to avoid being surprised again."<br><br><br><br>
Paul Fraser, of CSIRO Atmospheric Research in Melbourne, described the new study as a "significant result".<br><br><br><br>
Last year, Dr Fraser's team discovered that the level of chlorine in the atmosphere released by CFCs, the main source of chlorine pollution, had begun to fall.<br><br><br><br>
He said ozone in the upper stratosphere was particularly sensitive to chlorine levels but, because there was so little of it, it was important that signs of a slowdown also be detected in the lower stratosphere. Observations in Melbourne suggested this might be starting to occur, but were not yet conclusive.<br><br><br><br>
Many factors apart from chlorine levels, including amounts of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxode and methane, influence ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere.</b></div>
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Good news? I read this article:<br><br><a href="http://www.nature.com/nsu/030721/030721-10.html" target="_blank">http://www.nature.com/nsu/030721/030721-10.html</a>
 

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I don't think the ozone layer is affected by our being here as much as we think.<br><br><br><br>
I have read a lot on this subject, and discussed it with scientists I trust (one being my dad) and I have come to the conclusion the ozone depletion may be natural.<br><br><br><br>
Now we may be forcing its hand a little faster, but I think we may see the depletion reverse itself in the future, and it won't be because we "saved" it.<br><br><br><br>
Just my opinion - as well as a lot of other people MUCH smarter than I am.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by pghmountainbkr</i><br><br>
I don't think the ozone layer is affected by our being here as much as we think.<br><br><br><br>
I have read a lot on this subject, and discussed it with scientists I trust (one being my dad) and I have come to the conclusion the ozone depletion may be natural.</div>
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It is a natural thing, but we accelerate it. The proces is going faster and then it is going slower. The human involvement in it is higher then the natural.<br><br><br><br>
Only we have to watch out.
 

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I believe in the problems with the ozone layer. I burnt my nose in Punta Arenas (across Fireland) while sitting in the rain ar 12 °C in a park.<br><br>
Even small steps to reduce chlorine emissions are still warranted.
 

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That is wonderful news! I know that the problem is by no means rectified, but it is certainly a start. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
I tend to agree that although ozone depletion is a natural thing, we undoubtedly acclerate it.
 

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Unluckily, all ozone-damaging products which were banned in Europe and the U.S. at the time of going ozone-conscious, went straight to South American markets so that the companies that produced them wouldn't lose so much money.<br><br>
Rich countries would be happy with the companies as well as southamericans, because they were getting cheaper products! (money is everything it seems, how sad for both).<br><br><br><br>
What's more, practically all the stuff that is banned goes to poor countries' markets (especially medical products). And ecological gas is even more expensive than regular gas. Can you believe this? How are we going to change the world with people who think like this?
 

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That's some of the best environmental news I've heard in a long time. Now if we can just get George Bush out of the White House...
 
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