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I seem to have this idea that all plant-based fats are "good" fats and all animal-based fats are "bad" fats. I haven't done any research on this. I was wondering if I'm right about this, or totally wrong? Does anybody have an idea?
 

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Just look for the fats that have one or more double bonds between the carbon atoms of the fatty acid chain


Saturated fats are usually the ones that stay solid at room temperature such as butter, coconut oil, lard, and hydrogenated oils.

~Wondre
 

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But lots of margarine is non-hydrogenated now. Not all of it, but most, I think.

And, yeah, I THINK in general you will be safer with plant-based fats. Well, there may be some non-good veggie ones, but are there ANY healthy animal fats? And even the non-good veggie ones are non-good because we've made them non-good, right?

non-good.
 

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Well, there may be some non-good veggie ones, but are there ANY healthy animal fats? And even the non-good veggie ones are non-good because we've made them non-good, right?
Possibly omega-3 but, technically, fish don't even produce those themselves. Not that I've eaten any since the fall of the iron curtain anyway


Tropical vegetable fats like cocoa butter, palm oil, coconut oil etc. are inherently high in sat fats.
 

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Fatty acids can be saturated, mono- and poly-unsaturated (latter includes omega 3,6,9) and hydrogenated (both mono and polyunsaturated). Hydrogenated fats (also called trans fats) are thoroughly bad for you. Unsaturated fats are usually referred to as 'good' fats, and they also include the essential fatty acids (the aforementioned omegas). Saturated fats are ok in moderation (they're kinda unavoidable in small quantities), bad in excess.

Animal fats tend to have a bad name because of their high saturated fat content, not to mention cholesterol, and are best eaten in moderation.

Plant fats are usually 'healthier', although they too can contain saturated fats.

Bottom line, you need fat in your diet, so make sure you choose fats that are definitely not hydrogenated, aim for mono- and polyunsaturated ones, and don't be afraid of the saturated ones, but try to have less of them. (e.g. don't avoid nuts because they have saturated fats, just don't have a bagful a day).

Good sites to check nutrient content and facts about fats:

World's Healthiest Foods

Human Nutrition
 

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From Wikipedia:

The above study involved only 14 subjects, and it is unclear how the coconut oil used for the study was processed. The conclusion that coconut oil is unhealthy is consistent with prior concerns raised by the AHA.

Another study [[1]] by coconut oil advocates suggested that coconut oil reduces LDL and improves HDL.

A study done by the Lazaro Hospital showed that coconut oil reduced the viral load on HIV patients. 15 participants were involved in the study and 7 of them showed substantial improvement after consuming coconut oil daily for six months. [[2]] However, the study could have produced better results if the participants consumed more coconut oil.

Participants in the study who consumed more coconut oil lowered their viral loads quicker than those who consumed less coconut oil. Furthermore, there have been instances where people have consumed as much as 1 cup of coconut oil a day and have lowered their viral loads to undetectable amounts.[[
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazikeen View Post

Fatty acids can be saturated, mono- and poly-unsaturated (latter includes omega 3,6,9) and hydrogenated (both mono and polyunsaturated). Hydrogenated fats (also called trans fats) are thoroughly bad for you. Unsaturated fats are usually referred to as 'good' fats, and they also include the essential fatty acids (the aforementioned omegas). Saturated fats are ok in moderation (they're kinda unavoidable in small quantities), bad in excess.

Animal fats tend to have a bad name because of their high saturated fat content, not to mention cholesterol, and are best eaten in moderation.

Plant fats are usually 'healthier', although they too can contain saturated fats.

Bottom line, you need fat in your diet, so make sure you choose fats that are definitely not hydrogenated, aim for mono- and polyunsaturated ones, and don't be afraid of the saturated ones, but try to have less of them. (e.g. don't avoid nuts because they have saturated fats, just don't have a bagful a day).

Good sites to check nutrient content and facts about fats:

World's Healthiest Foods

Human Nutrition
Here, here!

or is it Hear, Hear ?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mazikeen View Post

Animal fats tend to have a bad name because of their high saturated fat content, not to mention cholesterol, and are best eaten [never.]
fixed
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amy SF View Post

I seem to have this idea that all plant-based fats are "good" fats and all animal-based fats are "bad" fats. I haven't done any research on this. I was wondering if I'm right about this, or totally wrong? Does anybody have an idea?
You are more or less totally wrong. Animal vs plant doesn't map to good vs bad. If you are a vegetarian, don't eat hydrogenated fat and have a reliable source of omega 3 fatty acids and DHA you probably won't die because of the kinds of fat you ate.

If you want to go further than that you'll have to learn the nomenclature.
 

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A lot of food companies are removing the trans fat out of their products, but they're being quite sneaky about it. I believe some of them replaced hydrogenated oils for palm kernil oils and such. Also, some replaced products are still hydrogenated, but differently (usually towards the end of the listed ingredients as opposed to the beginning) and are trans fat free. Are they still healthy to consume?

For example, the peanut butter that I eat has select roasted peanuts, maltodextrin, sugar, salt, and hydrogenated vegetable oil. Per tablespoon, it has 6 grams of fat

(1 gram of it is saturated and it's trans fat free)

Am I to assume that the remaining 5 grams of fat is healthy? Are there any other hidden unhealthy fats that they don't mention? Thank you.

Respectfully,

Josef
 
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