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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I don't like the thought that animals have died for what's on my plate, and I'm really concerned about the environment and know that a veggie diet is best for the earth. I would really like to start eating less meat and more veggie, my problem is that I have some food allergies. I am allergic to wheat (bread, pasta, couscous, seitan etc) and I can't eat beans (including soy). This sort of limits my options for protein on a veggie diet to nuts and eggs (and dairy but I'm not a big fan). I get very hungry and need a lot of food, and normally eat 4-5 meals a day. Please help me with some ideas for substantial filling veggie meals I can eat, I made a cashew nut curry last night which was very good, but I can't think of anything else.

Thanks
 

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Quorn is a good meat substitute that's high in protein. I don't get it anymore because I don't eat eggs, but I THINK most of the products are bean/wheat free, because it is made of fungus and egg? They make microwave meals, all sorts of 'meat replacement' things like kievs and nuggets, and mince and stuff.

You could do a day that's something like this...

Breakfast: wheat-free cereal with dairy milk/rice milk/oat milk, coffee or tea or juice or whatever you drink, a couple of pieces of fruit.

Snack: another piece of fruit, or some chocolate, or other snack.

lunch: a big veggie stir-fry with nuts and vegetables and sauce. Rice noodles don't normally contain wheat I don't think, you could add these if you want it to be more filling.

snack: salad or a vegetable soup

dinner: curries with quorn or nuts used to add protein, or just no protein-rich food at all some days. Believe it or not, you don't have to be paranoid about getting enough protein! It's a good idea you get a protein source in every day, but you don't need to panic as it's actually quite easy to get protein on a veggie diet.

Eggs can be cooked in quite a few different ways and so might be good for meals for you, but they should obviously only be eaten in moderation. Things like omelettes and scrambled egg are good things the center a meal around and don't have to be only eaten for breakfast. If you decide to move away from dairy, be careful because oat & rice milk and the like don't usually contain as much protein as dairy & soy milk.

I don't have much experience with avoiding wheat or beans, but I hope I was of a little help. I'm sorry that you have this extra challenge when going vegetarian and I hope it works out for you! Maybe you should start by cutting out meat for one day a week and increasing it from there?

 

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Also, I hope she wont mind me saying this, but the user HandcuffedAngel is a vegan who suffers from a lot of allergies (I think including some of yours) and might be able to give you an idea of what she eats
 
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quinoa (pronounced 'keen-wah') is a really good source of protein as well as loads of other excellent things (amino acids and minerals, etc).

it looks and acts like a grain but isn't one (its a dried fruit, apparently!) so is ok in a wheat free diet.

if you look in a health food store, big grocery store, or online natural food store, you can find loads of stuff made from it, including flour, pasta, breakfast cereal, (and i bet cookies and crackers) as well as the 'whole (not) grains' which you can use in place of rice or couscous in hot breakfasts, soups, salads, with curry or stir fry ... or wherever else you'd usually use a grain.

in the uk (i don't know where in the world you are!), you can even get quinoa in meaty style chunks!

http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-...il/303115.html

if you were really worried about protein (i think we're perhaps all led to panic a bit too much about protein, though), you could also probably use a rice or hemp protein powder, and throw some into a smoothie or some juice or something every now and then, for a bit of a boost. see examples here:

http://www.veganessentials.com/catal...luten-free.htm

http://www.veganessentials.com/catal...ng-harvest.htm
 

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I'm vegan and also intollerent to gluten products and have no issue at all. Though i could see it being harder without soy. There are lots of products out there for people suffering from allergies that are vegetarian and even vegan. Gluten free pasta and bread is fairly widely avalible as are cakes, cookies and other items, just check out you local wholefood store or supermarket. There is a vegetarian cookbook that has recipes for vegetarians with multiple allergies.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vegetarian-C...e=UTF8&s=books
 

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Hi. I'm okay with wheat but try not to eat too much of it. I am also soy allergic and can't eat fruit. Beans are a pretty big no no. I can eat small amounts but not a bean meal if you know what I mean. So I eat a lot of lentils, I know they are still a legume but they are super yummy and easy (especially the red one's). As for soy, it's in pretty much everything on the shelves so you have to cook a lot yourself. I make a lot of vege and lentil burgers and freeze them. I eat them as burgers but also as a "meat" on my plate, usually with a grain like quinoa or millet, cous cous or polenta and some steamed veges. Quinoa itself is good, cook it, throw in a tsp of vege marg or butter and a teaspoon of nutritional yeast flakes and serve it with steamed veges and some mushrooms. Mushies are another staple of mine, and are particularly nice when filled.

Milks you can use rice milk or my favourite almond milk (or any other nut or a nut and sesame seed and sunflower seed milk) and you can make creams, sour creams, nut cheeses etc etc with them.

Errrm if you google soy allergic or soy intolerant vegan it brings up quite a bit too. Hope this helps and just know it is totally doable to be veg and have food allergies


(PS, if you can eat chickpeas which I know are technically a bean I have a recipe for tofu made from them and am experimenting soon with a rice tofu, if it turns out okay I'll post the recipe for you
)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all your responses, I think not being able to have beans is more difficult than no wheat - I went almost vegetarian for a year before and virtually lived off them (probably what's caused me problems) so all the veggie meals I know are based around beans.

wildtigercubs, I can't eat chickpeas, but if you manage a rice tofu I'd love to have the recipe. I have a recipe for regular tofu, do you just make it in the same way but with chickpeas/rice?
 

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Lol, no I don't actually have a recipe. Wikipedia said that in Burma they make a rice tofu out of rice flour. I have the Burmese Tofu recipe (Tohu) which is made from chickpea flour which I made today. I'm going to experiment with making the rice one the same way just with rice flour instead of chickpea (I googled like mad but couldn't find anything). I'm not sure whether to use normal rice flour or glutinous rice flour though
But I'll experiment and if I come up with something edible I'll post it here for you


Beans can be a tough one, I find it difficult sometimes but it's not impossible. I think the hardest thing for me is I have to go through periods of eating low fibre. There's really not much vegan that's low fibre so it can be quite a challenge and hard not to live off bread and potato.
 
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