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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i realize that a lot of indian cuisine is vegetarian, but how do you cope with ghee if you were to travel there? has anyone been with success?
 

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What is your objection to Ghee?

I've been to India many times and its very easy to eat ghee-less actually.

South Indian cuisine is mostly vegetarian to (Hinduism) so you'll have a wealth of options. Unlike the rest of Asia which is heavy in meat and fish
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks isowish.

i do not consume dairy, but more importantly, i am severely allergic (even though i wouldn't have it anyway, but just stressing the importance that i could not even slip up).

therefore, i was wondering, as i knowthat a lot of traditional cuisine does use ghee, would it be difficult to 'survive' there (and also not be able to consume rice or gluten).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by laurie15 View Post

thanks isowish.

i do not consume dairy, but more importantly, i am severely allergic (even though i wouldn't have it anyway, but just stressing the importance that i could not even slip up).

therefore, i was wondering, as i knowthat a lot of traditional cuisine does use ghee, would it be difficult to 'survive' there (and also not be able to consume rice or gluten).
Have you thought about getting a vegan passport? (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vegan-Passpo...01&sr=8-1)When eating out it should be able to ensure you'll at least get a vegan meal. As far as i'm aware gluten isnt used all that widely in indian cooking (only in obvious gluten containing items such as breads etc.). Rice i'd guess would be harder to avoid but pretty obvious in most dishes. Travelling with a restricted diet can be hard but it's never impossible. You'll survive, just be prepared that sometimes you might end up surviving on things that arent really a meal and theres always fruit and veggies. It seems to me that most countries are pretty westernised these days anyway so there'll always be something to eat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
i have dietary cards similar to that, but thank you!

i figure that the 'worst' scenerio is eating just fruits and veggies (which isn't bag, but enjoying cuisine there would be half the delight of going).

you're right, india isn't a gluten-filled place - chickpea flour is used in many of their foods, which is grand! i am worried about rice as an additive (rice vinegar) but maybe it's not as rampant there.

i'm also allergic to onions and garlic, so i think anything cooked might be out of the question. i just was really wondering about the ghee, though.

but thank you!

whenever i travel, i make sure it's a destination that has markets for fruits and veg, anyway.
 

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India is a country of many different religions each with their own dietary restrictions. Restaurants are used to dealing with these restrictions. For non-dairy items just tell the waiter you are 'brahman vegetarian' which is pure vegetarian, ie non-dairy, and they'll understand and serve you what you are looking for. I ate like a vegan king during my time in India. Just be sure to communicate effectively with your server.
 
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