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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So at my annual pap smear my doctor told me about Gardasil, the new vaccine that protects against several types of HPV, therefore helping to protect against cervical cancer and genital warts. I'm not sure if this is available in the US or what, but in Canada it is now available. Unfortunately it hasn't been out long enough for it to be fully covered by health plan, I suppose they're still deciding if it's effectiveness is worth investing in. Anyway I was just wondering if anyone here has taken the Gardasil vaccine? What are your opinions on it?
 

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I got the 1st one, though it took them a while to convince me since I hate syringes, but I'm sure it's worth it. It makes your arm sore for the first day or so after getting it but that's all, I'm not sure what else to say about it.
 

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i think it's a ridiculous vaccine that offers hardly any protection at all.

first, there is no evidence that it protects against genital warts.

second, roughly 1/4 of HPV types are linked with cervical cancer, and of those, this vaccine only 'protects' against roughly 1/4 of those.

third, even if you take the vaccine, you can still get a form of HPV, including one of the strains that are linked to cervical cancer, and the vaccine itself isn't a guarentee that it will protect one against getting the forms of HPV that it supposedly vaccinates against.

and fourth, it doesn't protect against other origins of cervical cancer.

so IMO, why bother?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoebird View Post

i think it's a ridiculous vaccine that offers hardly any protection at all.

first, there is no evidence that it protects against genital warts.

second, roughly 1/4 of HPV types are linked with cervical cancer, and of those, this vaccine only 'protects' against roughly 1/4 of those.

third, even if you take the vaccine, you can still get a form of HPV, including one of the strains that are linked to cervical cancer, and the vaccine itself isn't a guarentee that it will protect one against getting the forms of HPV that it supposedly vaccinates against.

and fourth, it doesn't protect against other origins of cervical cancer.

so IMO, why bother?
But...type 16 and 18, against which the vaccine IS designed to protect, cause by far, the majority of cervical cancers (70% is the estimate). There may only be 1/4 of the strains that are linked to cervical cancer, but those few are responsible for nearly all of the cases identified.

Now, I have a lot of reservations still (primarily that I'm not yet convinced that it's safe), but I don't think your second point is particularly important. Additionally, there is some evidence that it provides protection against genital warts, caused by some strains of HPV.
 

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jen:

i'll look into the numbers again, but when i researched the vaccine, HPV wasn't the leading cause of cervical cancer, nor were those strains of HPV the only ones to cause it.
 

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Here's one of the pages that states the 70% number. No one, not even the vaccine makers claim that the associated strains are the only ones that cause cervical cancer, just that they are responsible for most of the cases.

http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/de...asp?page=16024
 

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Both of the young women I know who got cervical cancer had HPV. I think its a good thing to get, if you are not in an exclusive, trust filled relationship. I'm married, and do not have HPV, and I will not get the vaccine. For my daughter who is going to be born soon? Luckily I have several years before I have to worry about that for her, and the drug can be tested a while longer. But I would seriously consider it.
 

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If I am remembering correctly, the strain of HPV that causes cancer is not the same as the one that causes the warts (strains 6 and 11). So, yes the vaccine may not prevent you from getting genital warts but it prevents the strains (16, 18, 31, 33, 39, 45, 51, etc.) that can cause cancer. There are somewhere around 40 strains of HPV that are transmitted sexually and about a dozen or so that are 'high-risk'. I wonder how easy it is for a dr to determine which strain someone has and if it's 'high risk'.

Jen, I have read the 70% stat as well but in that 70% of cancer is caused by two strains of HPV (16 & 18). I don't know what percentage of cancer is caused by the other strains. I've also heard 100% of cervical cancer is directly related to HPV but I am not sure of the accuracy of that statement.
 

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Here's some interesting info if you are considering it: http://www.inciid.org/article.php?cat=&id=433

We don't know the long term effects of Gardasil and in my opinion it hasn't been tested to the point of my feeling comfortable that it's safe. It's scary that some states are pushing to mandate Gardasil before the long term effects are known.

More here:

http://www.nvic.org/Diseases/HPV/HPVHOME.htm

http://one.revver.com/watch/197846

Just 15 days after the Centers for Disease Control recommended that all 11 and 12 year old girls in America get three doses of Merck's HPV vaccine, GARDASIL, the very first GARDASIL reaction report was filed with the federal Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting system. The report described a 14 year old District of Columbia girl, who was injected with GARDASIL on July 11, 2006 and complained of severe pain at the injection site, lost consciousness, fell off the examining table, regained consciousness and experienced tingling, numbness, pain and twitching in her hands and feet, headache and blurry vision. She vomited in the parking lot, lost her speech and was sent to the Emergency Room, where she continued to exhibit difficulty speaking upon neurological examination. This first GARDASIL reaction report, which included collapse and loss of sensation in the hands and feet along with other neurological signs, was a prophetic warning. In the seven months following licensure of GARDASIL, many of the more than 600 vaccine reaction reports involve similar kinds of serious neurological symptoms among young girls and women.

http://www.nvic.org/Loe_Fisher/HPVDC.htm
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hang~Ten~Honey View Post

If I am remembering correctly, the strain of HPV that causes cancer is not the same as the one that causes the warts (strains 6 and 11). So, yes the vaccine may not prevent you from getting genital warts but it prevents the strains (16, 18, 31, 33, 39, 45, 51, etc.) that can cause cancer. There are somewhere around 40 strains of HPV that are transmitted sexually and about a dozen or so that are 'high-risk'. I wonder how easy it is for a dr to determine which strain someone has and if it's 'high risk'.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SotallyTober View Post

We don't know the long term effects of Gardasil and in my opinion it hasn't been tested to the point of my feeling comfortable that it's safe. It's scary that some states are pushing to mandate Gardasil before the long term effects are known.

Just 15 days after the Centers for Disease Control recommended that all 11 and 12 year old girls in America get three doses of Mercks HPV vaccine, GARDASIL, the very first GARDASIL reaction report was filed with the federal Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting system. The report described a 14 year old District of Columbia girl, who was injected with GARDASIL on July 11, 2006 and complained of severe pain at the injection site, lost consciousness, fell off the examining table, regained consciousness and experienced tingling, numbness, pain and twitching in her hands and feet, headache and blurry vision. She vomited in the parking lot, lost her speech and was sent to the Emergency Room, where she continued to exhibit difficulty speaking upon neurological examination. This first GARDASIL reaction report, which included collapse and loss of sensation in the hands and feet along with other neurological signs, was a prophetic warning. In the seven months following licensure of GARDASIL, many of the more than 600 vaccine reaction reports involve similar kinds of serious neurological symptoms among young girls and women.
It is downright SCARY what's been going on in the US in regards to this vaccine.

Pharmaceutical companies are some of the highest profit making organizations in the world! Of course they support any gov't efforts to mandate such a vaccine. And, unfortunately, as noted above, just because there's been FDA approval and gov't acceptance of a prescription medication doesn't mean that it's safe!

I have HPV and have had it for probably 5-10 years. I have to get pap smears more often than most women (1-2x/yr instead of 1x every 2 yrs). And I've been through a punch biopsy (where they punched out some of my cervix to study the cells) and a 'freezing' of my cervix. Now, these things were scary. BUT, after I found out I had HPV, my doctor and several organizations I consulted with told me that the majority of sexually active women have some form of HPV. Some forms cause genital warts (as noted above) and others cause cervical changes. The point is to learn about the virus and what you need to do to protect yourself. I've heard so so many stories about women coming down with a certain form of 'female' cancer but that haven't had a pap smear in the last 10 years or a mammogram in the last 5. AND I also learned that HPV is esssentially sub-clinical in men - meaning it can't be found by the naked eye and there really isn't any test for it. I tried to get my boyfriend at the time to get tested for it but his doctor acted like it was no big deal (though I had told him exactly what the literature said about how to get tested). I also learned what exacerbates HPV - smoking, stress, etc. and did a bunch of lifestyle changes ... the next pap after the freezing of my cervix was normal!

So ... just wanted to give my opinion as someone who's been there ...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hang~Ten~Honey View Post

If I am remembering correctly, the strain of HPV that causes cancer is not the same as the one that causes the warts (strains 6 and 11). So, yes the vaccine may not prevent you from getting genital warts but it prevents the strains (16, 18, 31, 33, 39, 45, 51, etc.) that can cause cancer. There are somewhere around 40 strains of HPV that are transmitted sexually and about a dozen or so that are 'high-risk'. I wonder how easy it is for a dr to determine which strain someone has and if it's 'high risk'.

Jen, I have read the 70% stat as well but in that 70% of cancer is caused by two strains of HPV (16 & 18). I don't know what percentage of cancer is caused by the other strains. I've also heard 100% of cervical cancer is directly related to HPV but I am not sure of the accuracy of that statement.
The vaccine protects (or is designed to protect) against strains related both to gw (chuckle) AND cervical cancer. Even the propaganda distributed with the vaccine doesn't say that HPV is the only cause of cervical cancer, but it's some overwhelming majority of cases.

I've seen some places recommending condoms as protection against HPV, but others saying that while they're better than nothing, they're not particularly effective.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamJen View Post

The vaccine protects (or is designed to protect) against strains related both to gw (chuckle) AND cervical cancer. Even the propaganda distributed with the vaccine doesn't say that HPV is the only cause of cervical cancer, but it's some overwhelming majority of cases.

I've seen some places recommending condoms as protection against HPV, but others saying that while they're better than nothing, they're not particularly effective.
Are they saying how effective this vaccine is? Or do they not know all of that yet. I don't think that anyone is saying that HPV is the cause of 100% of cervical cancer cases but that "HPV strains were detected in almost 100% of all cervical cancer cases" meaning that HPV is showing to be a factor in those cases when the virus does not go away on it's own.

Not having genital contact with anyone is what they say is the best protection and I am sure many people will be okay with that.
I am still skeptical of vaccines as a whole though. How long have they studied the effects of Gardasil?
 

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I think it's a good idea, overall, but it isn't recommended for women over the age of 25, and I'm 27, so i'm out of the vaccine pool anyway.
 

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Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

I think it's a good idea, overall, but it isn't recommended for women over the age of 25, and I'm 27, so i'm out of the vaccine pool anyway.
Yeah, I just turned 26 so I suppose I am out as well. I wonder why 25 is the magic cut off age?
 

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Originally Posted by Hang~Ten~Honey View Post

Yeah, I just turned 26 so I suppose I am out as well. I wonder why 25 is the magic cut off age?
my guess would just be that this is the age they tested up to in their trials so they could not guarentee its effectiveness for 'older' folks.

and i think the vaccine was ~100% effective against those strains that they list.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yeah from what I understand it is not 100% guaranteed to prevent cancer or genital warts, it's just a little something to help reduce the chances of catching something. I would like to get the vaccine but it's quite expensive and I'm trying to wait until it's been around longer. I don't care so much about its effectiveness since something is better than nothing, but I am a bit concerned about the safety of it.
 

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I'd get it if I were sexually active.

Vaccines will alwaysalwaysalways carry a risk. A boy who sits next to me in English just about died from heavy metal poisoning from vaccines. Knowing him well, I still marched in and got my Hep B shot with everyone else.

It's a terrible collectivist thing to say, but if a few people (yes, including me, since I'm getting the vaccines) get sick in order to wipe out a disease that could seriously hurt mankind (not necessarly the case for Gadasil, but for things like polio) I'd have to say it's worth it. The only reason the nonvaccinated kids don't get sick is because every other kid on the block took the risk and got the needle jabbed into their arm, if everybody was anti-vaccination, the nonvaccinated people would have a problem.
 
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