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<div class="quote-block">Senator Frist admits fradulently adopting and killing cats<br><br>
. 11:21am Thu Jan 2 '03 (Modified on 5:25pm Mon Jan 6 '03)<br><br>
article#39858<br><br><br><br>
Frist acknowledged in a 1989 book that he routinely killed cats while an ambitious medical student at Harvard Medical School in the 1970s. His office said it had no record on how many cats died. Frist disclosed that he went to animal shelters and pretended to adopt the cats, telling shelter personnel he intended to keep them as pets. Instead he used them to sharpen his surgical skills, killing them in the process.<br><br>
WASHINGTON, Dec. 31 (UPI) -- Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., is being asked by an animal advocacy group to support legislation for better animal treatment to make up for fraudulently adopting cats from animal shelters then experimenting on and killing them while he was a medical student.<br><br><br><br>
A Dec. 31 letter from the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals asked Frist to make amends by pressing for reforms that would replace old-style tests where animals are subjected to painful and sometimes deadly procedures with newer, more humane approaches. They also requested that he help fund research to find non-animal alternatives.<br><br><br><br>
Frist acknowledged in a 1989 book that he routinely killed cats while an ambitious medical student at Harvard Medical School in the 1970s. His office said it had no record on how many cats died. Frist disclosed that he went to animal shelters and pretended to adopt the cats, telling shelter personnel he intended to keep them as pets. Instead he used them to sharpen his surgical skills, killing them in the process.<br><br><br><br>
The newly elected leader of the Senate Republicans revealed the practice in his book "Transplant: A Heart Surgeon's Account of the Life-and-Death Dramas of the New Medicine."<br><br><br><br>
"It was a heinous and dishonest thing to do," Frist wrote, in a passage quoted by The Boston Globe. On Tuesday, Frist's press aide, Nick Smith, told United Press International that "Senator Frist denounces the activities that he did while he was in medical school -- as he has done before."<br><br><br><br>
It is not clear if Frist's actions were illegal. Many states ban shelters from knowingly letting their animals be taken for such purposes.<br><br><br><br>
Massachusetts put such a ban in place in 1983. Frist was a student in the Boston area from 1974 to 1978. A total of 14 states have passed such laws. Four states -- Iowa, Minnesota, Utah and Oklahoma -- still have laws that allow labs to demand the release of animals for experimental use.<br><br><br><br>
But such regulations, called pound seizure laws, only govern the actions of the shelters.<br><br><br><br>
"The pound seizure law probably would not apply there because the shelter did not intentionally sell the animal to him for this purpose," said Debora Bresch, a lawyer and a lobbyist for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.<br><br><br><br>
"They thought they were adopting the animal out to him," said Bresch. "What he did was fraudulent and probably was illegal."<br><br><br><br>
"It would probably would be considered cruel back even then," added Stephen Musso, senior vice president and chief of operations of ASPCA.<br><br><br><br>
Though Musso said he personally had not heard about the Frist incident, he told UPI, "We wouldn't want to see anybody taking an animal out of an animal shelter and doing anything with it -- first of all that would be harmful; second of all, different than the intentions that they gave to the people at that shelter or humane organization."<br><br><br><br>
Attitudes toward animal experimentation have shifted, said Gary Patronek, director of the Tufts Center for Animals and Public Policy in North Grafton, Mass.<br><br><br><br>
"The fact that laws have passed prohibiting the practice of pound seizure in 14 states is evidence of the fact that society's attitudes have changed," Patronek told UPI. "The laws reflect the attitudes. If there isn't a broad social consensus about something, then typically the laws don't change."<br><br><br><br>
The demographics have changed also. By the end of 2000, a total of 34 percent of American households had at least one cat -- a sharp rise of 8 percent in only two years. The American Pet Products Manufacturers Association also said in their 2001-2002 National Pet Owner Survey that 39 percent of all U.S. households owned at least one dog in 2000, about the same percentage as in 1998.<br><br><br><br>
Though Frist's practice has been known for 11 years, the matter appears to be gathering new attention since his election as Senate majority leader. E-mail with copies of news articles mentioning the incident are bouncing around the Internet, said Bresch.<br><br><br><br>
One Frist supporter said the senator's opponents are fueling the interest in the issue.<br><br><br><br>
"What is happening here is that people are doing profiles of the senator, and they are desperate to find something wrong with him and to come up with something bad in his past," he pointed out.<br><br><br><br>
Whether Frist will come to the aid of animal legislative causes remains to be seen. His spokesman said they had not seen the PETA letter and therefore would not comment on it.<br><br><br><br>
PETA, normally more combative and high-profile, took a somewhat restrained tone in its letter. There was no mistaking PETA's opinion, however, as the organization asked Frist to make an effort on the animals' behalf.<br><br><br><br>
"There could be no better way of making some small amends to those animals whose trust you betrayed when you took them from shelters," the letter said.<br><br><br><br>
(With reporting by Nicholas M. Horrock in Washington)</div>
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Wow.<br><br><br><br>
Just...wow.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 

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Yeah, this truly says something about the guys character (or lack thereof). He lied and killed in the process for his own personal gain. What a ef-in looser!
 

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I found out about this when he was urging Lott to 'do the right thing' and step down from the majority leader position. The guy is creepy 2 tha XTREME.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" src="http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/nm/20021220/mdf172399.jpg" style="border:0px solid;"> RAWRR
 

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looks like someone surgically removed dudes lips...hehehe<br><br><br><br>
definitely looks like scum to me..and doesn't it burn you up that he's paid with tax payer monies..like all of the rest of the elected officials..I wish I had a direct say so outside of voting on whether they get paid or not year to year..sort of like an annual review. Didn't do well this year? Promised on stuff you didn't deliver? Mislead the public with lies for your own benefit? Sorry, but we don't feel like paying you for not doing your job. I know, I know..some of them are good..but the older I get the more synical I get in regards to politicians and their true motives. And to think when I was younger (when I first started to vote at the wee age of 18) I believed that the majority of them were actually concerned with making the country/world better for all inhabitants. Boy, I sure did loose those rose-colored glasses fast.<br><br><br><br>
Whew..enough of my ranting...carry on
 

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I don't see what the big deal is. If he didn't kill the cats, the shelter would have killed them. My local shelter adopts out only a tiny percent of the cats they mop up from the streets. At least he learned something from them, before killing them. This is no less a legitimate use of animals than using them for food is, yet vegetarians don't villianize people who eat animal, well, at least I think we shouldn't.
 

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" He lied and killed in the process for his own personal gain. "<br><br><br><br>
I can't tell you how many million times I did the same kind of lying, for the same kind of reason. And it wasn't entirelyh for his own personal gain, either. He used what he learned, to help sick people. When I was 10, I said I was 9, so I could get into movies at the 9-year old rate. When I used to do extensive repairs on my car, and needed parts for my car, I lied to the parts suppliers, telling them that I was reselling them, and collecting sales tax on the sales, so that they would give me a discount, and not collect sales tax from me. Then I put them in my own car, and never paid sales tax directly to the state, and the end of the fiscal period, like I should have, sending them, instead, a form with the lie on it, that I never either used or resold the parts and that they are still sitting in inventory. I feel no guilt and no remorse.<br><br><br><br>
7-year statue of limitations on felonies -- but the state could coneivably still extract sales or use tax from me, if I had seizable resources to cover the amount.
 

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"At least he learned something from them, before killing them"<br><br><br><br>
Since he was aiming to operate on humans as opposed to cats I'd like to see <b>exactly</b> what he learned and what he could not learn through other means.<br><br><br><br>
death <b>|</b> experimentation > death<br><br><br><br>
The difference would appear to be suffering.<br><br><br><br>
I have not experienced anything through interaction with anti / pro Vivisectionists and people involved that would lead me to my own conclusion that animal experimentation has ever benifited any lifeform yet one can give countless examples of the suffering & destruction it has caused in humans, animals, the environment and too the industry which it creates.
 

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Matt, I don't think there are many humans who would have permitted him to practice his armementarium of various suturing techniques, on them, using various suture materials, and working in various layers of tissue, as well as in all the different organs, each of which has a different texture, and requires a different "touch." Suturing a simple multilayer muscle wound can take a lot of finesse. Doing it perfectly right means rapid healing. Doing it just a little bit off, can mean the development of agonizing seromas and hematomas, that cannot be remedied without cutting wound open again and starting all over again, or redoing part of the closure, again. Doing it just a little bit too tight can mean capturing a nerve within the suture, and causing lifelong chronic pain, for which there is no rememdy other than painrelieving drugs. Making the suture too loose can result in seromas and hematomas. Doing it just right requires practice and finesse, and observing how the healing goes, over the next few weeks, so you can equate different styles of suturing with different healing results.<br><br><br><br>
Suturing a cat muscle is exactly the same as suturing a human muscle. Suturing a cat liver is exactly the same as suturing a human liver. You can learn everything you need to know in regard to hands-on technique for suturing humans, by suturing the homologous organ of any mammal.<br><br><br><br>
Need to practice my suturing of a resected lung, with the lung's unique consistency and texture? There is no other way I could get needed practicing in suturing a lung resections, without having a resected lung to suture. There is absolutely no computer simulation device available to show the feel, temperature, and texture of putting a needle thru lung tissue, pulling a suture through it, and tying one of the scores of kinds of different knots that surgeons use.
 

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"I don't think there are many humans who would have permitted him "<br><br><br><br>
Just take our mothers and farthers from retirement villages, death row inmates and starving children. I don't see what the big deal is, they are going to die soon anyway.<br><br><br><br>
Oops, I forgot -We don't need permission from the animals. I'm sure they would agree once they saw it <b>our</b> way.<br><br><br><br>
I hardly have the surgical knowledge to assume anything based on what you have posted but would be interested in learning more about them. All I can say is that everything i have seen so far has shown me nothing except ignorance towards nature. Causing suffering to both animals and humans in 1 form or another, sooner or later.<br><br><br><br>
Using, Damaging or Destroying a life to benefit <b>our</b> own will do no good in the long run the way i see it & that is all it is -the way <b>I</b> see it.<br><br><br><br>
After all what do you get when you combine <b>-1</b> with <b>+1</b>
 

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By the way, I figure the implementation of a law or local regulation or simply a pound policy, against pounds selling cats to experimenters, has probably resulted in breeders breeding cats especially for this purpose, and so has probably meant that the number of cats experimented on has remained the same, and that the number of cats killed has increased. Cats can be bred cheaply and easily. I wouldn't be surprised if the cost of buying a cat from a breeder, that an experimenter pays, is the same or less as the cost that a pound charges, if you adopt a cat, or that pounds used to charge experminters when they used to sell cats to experimenters. Some laws do not make a real change in how the world works, and are put in effect to appease certain people or groups who are watching the lawmakers, and asking for the laws. The laws just don't have a real effect on the situation that the people asking for the laws, think that the laws will have.<br><br><br><br>
 
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