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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a friend who is possibly considering veganism. I've gotten back in touch with her in the past 6 months or so and we seem to always have discussions regarding me being a vegan and treatment of animals. She recently watched Forks Over Knives (seems to convince a lot of people) and has decided to become pescatarian for a while.<br><br>
I encouraged her to take it a step further and try going vegan for a meal per day for one or two weeks just to try it. I don't find vegetarianism or pescatarianism that much more humane than omnivorism, so, in my eyes, there's hardly a difference.<br><br>
My question is, should I try and promote veganism to her with the hope that she'll turn to it more quickly? Or, should I just kind of back off and not pressure her with the hope that she'll come around by herself and not risk turning her away from it?
 

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well, instead of going straight into trying to convince her to be vegan, start out by suggesting she try some vegetarian food. Tell her about Meatless Monday (look it up) and invite her along to vegetarian or veg friendly restaurants and recommend some of the more well received dishes, etc. Start out slow, be encouraging, and I'm sure things will be fine <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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If I were you I'd focus on food only. I'd share recipes, restaurant suggestions, invite her to potlucks, etc. I would not pressure her to take it further than pescatarian until she truly stops eating land animals. I would wait til she slips up and calls herself vegetarian and then gently remind her (joke) that she's just a wannabe vegetarian until she stops eating sea creatures.
 

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Yep, go for the food. I'm in a similar situation, and I'm just cooking for her and sharing recipes. She was asking a lot of questions, and Earthlings came up in an answer to one, so she watched that. Just continue to be a good example, answer questions when asked, and don't push. Your friend will get there at her own pace.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Green_Gentleman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3074882"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I have a friend who is possibly considering veganism. I've gotten back in touch with her in the past 6 months or so and we seem to always have discussions regarding me being a vegan and treatment of animals. She recently watched Forks Over Knives (seems to convince a lot of people) and has decided to become pescatarian for a while.<br><br>
I encouraged her to take it a step further and try going vegan for a meal per day for one or two weeks just to try it. I don't find vegetarianism or pescatarianism that much more humane than omnivorism, so, in my eyes, there's hardly a difference.<br><br>
My question is, should I try and promote veganism to her with the hope that she'll turn to it more quickly? Or, should I just kind of back off and not pressure her with the hope that she'll come around by herself and not risk turning her away from it?</div>
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You don't find vegetarianism much more humane than omnivorisim? Really? Why? Correct me if I'm wrong but IMO there is absolutely nothing different between a vegetarian vs vegan diet with the exception of a few sweeteners.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Forster</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3075174"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You don't find vegetarianism much more humane than omnivorisim? Really? Why? Correct me if I'm wrong but IMO there is absolutely <b>nothing different between a vegetarian vs vegan diet with the exception of a few sweeteners.</b></div>
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I'm confused...
 

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Keep in mind many people refer to ovo-lacto vegetarianism simply as 'vegetarian', correct me if I'm wrong but it even seems thats how this site is fundamentally structured.<br>
Green very likely meant ovo-lacto rather than strict vegetarian, as a great many people would. It seems to have somehow become the default definition of 'vegetarian'.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>AeryFairy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3075181"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm confused...</div>
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Honey, bone charred processed sugar (or whatever the term is), etc.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Auxin</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3075258"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Keep in mind many people refer to ovo-lacto vegetarianism simply as 'vegetarian', correct me if I'm wrong but it even seems thats how this site is fundamentally structured.<br>
Green very likely meant ovo-lacto rather than strict vegetarian, as a great many people would. It seems to have somehow become the default definition of 'vegetarian'.</div>
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That's probably it. I view "vegetarian" probably more strictly than some, just plant based food none of the lacto ovo stuff. Again probably my own misconception but to me the main differences between between vegan and vegetarian is how one approaches the use of animal products outside one's diet. I do what I can to restrict such uses, but it's much more difficult and I can live with removing +/-99% of the animal products out of my life.<br><br>
But even if Green_Gentlemen is including lacto-ovo in the vegetarian I still don't understand the statement they are not much better than omnivores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Auxin</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3075258"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Keep in mind many people refer to ovo-lacto vegetarianism simply as 'vegetarian', correct me if I'm wrong but it even seems thats how this site is fundamentally structured.<br>
Green very likely meant ovo-lacto rather than strict vegetarian, as a great many people would. It seems to have somehow become the default definition of 'vegetarian'.</div>
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Yes, I was referring to "ovo-lacto vegetarianism" as opposed to the other vegetarian definition. With that definition, chances are that hardly any of us are, by definition, vegan. It's likely that particles from animal products do end up in our food (like bone charred sugar). I've heard that most car filters were made animal hair. Don't have a car? Many houses are made with animal products. But let's not get into that....<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Forster</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3075346"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
That's probably it. I view "vegetarian" probably more strictly than some, just plant based food none of the lacto ovo stuff. Again probably my own misconception but to me the main differences between between vegan and vegetarian is how one approaches the use of animal products outside one's diet. I do what I can to restrict such uses, but it's much more difficult and I can live with removing +/-99% of the animal products out of my life.<br><br>
But even if Green_Gentlemen is including lacto-ovo in the vegetarian I still don't understand the statement they are not much better than omnivores.</div>
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If you're an omnivore, you eat animal products from animals that suffer throughout their lives only to meet an untimely death when it's economically profitable. As an ovo-lacto, you eat animal products from animals that suffer throughout their lives only to meet an untimely death when the animals are no longer economically profitable (dairy cows, egg-laying hens). This is what I mean. Though ovo-lactos aren't killing the animals, they really are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you want numerical evidence for how vegetarianism isn't much better or is worse, look no further:<br><br><a href="http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/08/11/want-to-kill-fewer-animals-give-up-eggs-not-meat/" target="_blank">http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/...eggs-not-meat/</a>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Green_Gentleman</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3075917"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If you want numerical evidence for how vegetarianism isn't much better or is worse, look no further:<br><br><a href="http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2011/08/11/want-to-kill-fewer-animals-give-up-eggs-not-meat/" target="_blank">http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/...eggs-not-meat/</a></div>
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That's the thing though as I really don't consider lacto-ovo as being a "vegetarian" diet. They are lacto-ovo's. Veganism encompasses more than (what I consider) a vegetarian diet, however IMO the non-diet aspects of veganism, while having a positive impact on reducing animal suffering, pale in comparison to the positive impact a strict vegetarian diet. So IMO vegetarians are much better than omni's with regards to animal exploitation.
 
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