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Dumb question...which vegetables should be refrigerated and which should not? For instance, tomatoes seem to lose taste when they are in the fridge for a while. However, it seems that carrots keep best in the fridge. Is there a list out on the web for this? Or do we just assume that if they refrigerated at the grocer's then they should be refrigerated at home?
 

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Part of it would definitely depend on the temperature of where you lived and how long you wanted to keep the food for. Since fruit and vege stores typically don't keep anything in refrigerators I'd say that's not the best indicator to go by.
 

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Tomatoes shouldn't be kept in the fridge, you're right. They get mealy and tasteless.

Onions and potatoes should be kept in a cool, dry place.

Most fruit (apples, oranges, bananas, etc) can be kept on the counter or table. Apples tend to make other fruits ripen faster, so you might not want to keep them next to bananas or other fruits which quickly get overripe.

Most other vegetables should be kept in the fridge, but root vegetables can be kept in a cool, dry place.

Hope this helps!
 

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For the most part, I store my fruits/veggies in the same way the store does.

Except for tomatoes? Some stores store them in the refridgerated section and like Medesha has already stated, *DON'T* put tomatoes into the fridge.

Ewww!!

HTH,

Michelle
 

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After an avocado becomes ripe, you can put it in the fridge to keep it from getting over-ripe so quickly, and it will still taste wonderful.
 

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Oh yeah, some more tips.

-green leafy veggies (spinach, lettuce, etc). I wash and core these items (or separate into leaves, for big items like swiss chard), wrap them in paper towel, and put them in a large ziploc-style freezer bag. Same with fresh herbs, only a small ziploc bag. The paper towel absorbs moisture and keeps them fresher, longer.

-avocados: place in a paper bag to ripen more quickly, or in the fridge as delicious said to halt ripening. If you use half an avocado, remove the pit from the unusued half. Stretch a square of plastic wrap tightly over the exposed flesh. Replace the pit, and wrap in plastic wrap again. The key is to minimize the flesh's contact with air to keep it from turning brown.

-celery: if celery starts to get limp and wilts, place it upright in a glass with a few inches of water in the bottom. It will crisp right up, usually within an hour.

-onions: if you're the kind of person who might have old pantyhose with runs lying around the house, cut one leg off the hose. Place an onion in the hose, tie a knot above it, place a second onion in the hose, etc. until you have a string of onions. Hang the string or store in a cool, dark place. When you need an onion, simply snip off the lowest one. It keeps the skins from shedding all over your cupboards, and keeps them tidy.

I'll probably think of more later.
 

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Don't store your onions and potatoes together, unless you want your potoatoes to deteriorate.

I like to put bannana fruit in the fridge. It turns the skin black, but it stays fresh and tastes fine.
 

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I have a question about ginger root. I store in a cool dark place, like other root vegetables, but once I cut off a piece, what do I do? I feel like once it's cut and the flesh is exposed, it should be refrigerated, but then it doesn't seem to keep too long or too well. What does everyone else do?
 

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The most common methods are keeping it in the freezer (it grates pretty well frozen, or you can thaw for a few minutes before using) or keep it in the fridge, immersed in sherry.

Personally I just buy the jars of pre-minced stuff, but I'm lazy.
 
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