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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some of the products contain bee stuff. Other tahn that does anyone know if they are vegan? I emailed the site with no luck yet. I would love to know. They have body scrub for $4 and while I love Origins i can't pay $30 to buff my skin!
 

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Some of their stuff is. It will usually say on the back of the packaging if it doesn't contain animal ingredients. I emailed them once too, but they never responded.
 

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Today I was out of conditioner and ran up to my drug store to pick some Paul Mitchell ( not what I used, but I knew the store had it and that some are vegan friendly). Anyway, I saw a new product line called Binge, made by the people who make Freeman products. Their bottle of conditioner, called 2500 Calorie, states there are no animal ingredients. I didn't see any beeswax, ect,. so I bought it ( only 5.99 ) You can check out their website , <a href="http://www.bingehair.com." target="_blank">www.bingehair.com.</a> Seems pretty good though. They also have a skin care line as well. Sorry for rambling!
 

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Umm, 5.99 for less than 1/2 a pound of stuff doesn't sound inexpenive to me. It may be, compared to similar products, but I'd bet you could buy all the ingredient separately for less than $1.00<br><br><br><br>
couldn't find 2500 calorie. Could find ingredient lists for any of the products, either the totally Juicy, the Totally Nutty, or the as yet non-existant on the web site, Binge line. Also this web site is confusing to navigate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Erm...no one has time or the skills to make their own beauty products. How many of us actually whip up our own shampoo anyway?
 

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Erm...no one has time or the skills to make their own beauty products. How many of us actually whip up our own shampoo anyway?<br><br><br><br>
It's not that difficult. You just buy stuff, measure it approximately, and mix it together.<br><br><br><br>
I make my own eyeglass cleaner, and my own normal-saline nasal douche -- 2 products that are generally overpriced. Saline nasal douce is like $2.00 for a little 2 or 4 oz bottle. That is insane, since all you need is salt without iodine or free-flow additives (like diamond crystal kosher salt, which costs about $1.79 per pound), and distilled water, or even poland spring water will do fine (it is very close in quality to distilled). Then you mix in 1/2 a tsp of salt per 1/2 cup of water -- that is close enough. Then you rinse out a metered dose nose-spray bottle and fill it with the mix. The bottle will last thru about 50 re-fills before the metering mechanism wears out. So that $2.00 bottle of nasal douche costs you about $0.10, plus you get a hygienic metered dose applicator, instead of the simple spray bottle (which sucks nasal fluids back into it and allows micro-organisms in them to grow there).
 

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I've tried making my own shampoos with castile soaps but I have very thick long hair, with a tendency to get dry so I need exta conditioning. There are some things I don't mind buying, I need my hair looking pretty! I have a great book though on all kinds of homemade beauty products. I'm thinking of making some for girlfriens for x-mas this year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Saline solution and a deep conditioner for hair are two different things.<br><br><br><br>
I used to make my own solid perfumes, soaps and some cosmetics. Supplies sometimes can be a lot more pricey than buying premade.
 

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Muffcake, I'm not sure what "deep conditioner" for hair is. Hair doesn't need any conditioners. And it certainly doesn't need any "nutrition" as some idiotic advertisements claim: it is dead. Most ingredients seen in conditioners are superfluous. Hair will absorb moisture. I'm not sure if it will absorb oils or if it is normally simply coated with oil, supplied by the skin. But if you wash it excessively, such oils can be washed out. You replenish them by adding oils. Preferably ones that don't easily oxidize, go rancid -- that is, petroleum-based oils. Try mineral oil. Just a tiny amount. You can add a few drops to dishwashing detergent, before washing your hair with dishwashing detergent. This will replace the oils that the detergent washes out. Also, do not overwash your hair. Only use a tiny amount of dishwashing detergent -- not enough to wash all the oils out. And don't do 2 washes during one session. Just put a few drops each, from an eyedropper, of dishwashing detergent and mineral oil, in a cup, add a few tablespoons of water, mix, wash once.<br><br><br><br>
I try to get nonscented detergent. Then add a teensy speck, not even a drop, of your favorite fragrance that you may wear elsewhere -- that way you won't have competing fragrances.
 

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Soaps tend to leave a dull film on hair, no matter how thoroughly you try to rinse your hair. Dishwashing detergent is better. You don't want to thoroughly wash your hair. Just sort of half-wash it. Lest you remove too much oil. Oil is what gives hair "sheen" and a nice feel. But you don't want to add too much oil either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Erm, not to be rude but the advice you gave stinks. Dish washing soap is not made for dry hair. Adding oil would only mess with ones hair more. I work at a salon and know a thing or to.
 

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Well, Joy for Dishes works very well in my hair. I only use a tiny bit in the palm of my hand, smaller than the size of a dime, and rinse it out right away after I spread it thru.<br><br><br><br>
Se-colored and de-fragranced mineral oil is better and safer than ordinary motor oil, which has unidentified additives which could possibly be harmful to skin.<br><br><br><br>
Since hair is not living (except for a tiny portion at the base, under the skin's surface), there is no question about whether something is doing "unnoticed" harm to hair, the way there is about doing harm to living tissues, without it being immediately apparent. If it known to not be harmful to your skin, and after couple of hours after you put something in your hair, it doesn't appear to have done any damage to your hair -- then it hasn't done any damage to your hair. Hair is dead. Appearance is everything.
 

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If I started washing my hair with dish soap, my hair would start breaking off. I too worked at a salon, and as shallow as it may sound, I do take a particular degree of care in my appearance.
 

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I recommend dishwashing <b>detergent</b> and not dish <b>soap</b>. Soap doesn't rinse out thoroughly, and leaves a dull film on hair.<br><br><br><br>
Dawn, or Joy for Dishes, both remove a lot of oils, that is why you shouldn't use them more than every other day (unless you need to wash out motor oil that accidentally poured out on your head), and why you should only use a tiny amount, and not leave the suds in place for a long time. Put 2 tablespoons of water in a plastic cup, drop in <b>one drop</b> of Ultra Joy for Dishes, and mix in with the water; wet your hair; pour the 2 tablespoons of mixture on your head; lather up (it won't produce a large amount of lather) for about 20 seconds; rinse out right away. You will indeed strip your hair of it's natural oils, and added oils, if you use too much.<br><br><br><br>
I'd recommend fragrance-free dish liquid (they used to sell fragrance-free and color-free Dawn, but I haven't seen it recently), and adding a spec of your own fragrance to it.
 
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