VeggieBoards banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,691 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i know i know, the odds of it surviving are slim, and no i don't really want to get up at all hours of the night to feed it lol, but i can't just let it die, yaknow? even though it probably will anyways i feel like i need to give it a chance at least.
anyway it's a fledgling ummm maybe sparrow, not sure..., has lots of wing feathers but tail hasn't grown in yet and the head and chest are still stubbly and scraggly. probably not too far from flying. but when i found it it was just huddled on the grass really weak. it keeps trying to call out but it's so weak it has barely any voice, so i know the mother won't hear it. i waited outside with it for a bit to see if it would move on its own, but nope. so i brought food out to it thinking if it gets some strength back to call the mother it might be ok, but i don't see or hear a mother bird looking for it. could be that she's out gathering food for the rest of the babies so i'll go out and check again, and see if i can spot the nest. if it's reachable with a ladder we can place it back in the nest but the trees in that area are quite tall so i don't have much hope for that.

not sure if what i'm feeding it is good enough but it's all i could come up with. i had hamsters for a while, we ended up getting stuck with a pregnant one and therefore a litter of babies. i had been feeding the babies a mixture of grains and cereals mixed into a mush with unsweetened soymilk. i know birds don't typically get milk lol but i figured it'd add some protein so maybe better than using just water. so that's what i've been giving it just from my fingertips. it tries to eat a little bit but not much.

i'm not sure what else i can do for it =/
its feet and belly felt so cold when i picked it up, even though it's so hot outside. i think it's been there for a while, maybe overnight or since early this morning so the grass was dewy and cold under it, so i've got it on my lap in a towel. feels much warmer now at least. i don't think it's been there much longer than that though, it was just on the edge of my vegetable garden which we check on every day. though now that i think of it i'm not 100% sure if we did check it yesterday.

anyways i know it's best to leave it for the mother to attend to but there was no mother in sight and we have 3 dogs, i was really afraid the dogs would get it if i left it there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,691 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
googled and found this site, there's a great video explaining when you should and shouldn't intervene.
i don't know of any wildlife rehab in this area unfortunately but the bird seems uninjured and seems to have warmed up and fluctuates between alert and sleepy. i think it's not quite a fledgling or just barely, and maybe it is best to take this lady's advice from the video and put it up near the nest. i'm going to see if i can figure out where the nest is and nail up a container and see how it goes.
 

·
Herbivorous Urchin
Joined
·
9,717 Posts
Take it to the vet?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,131 Posts
I don't have any advice, really, but I wish you good luck in helping it! At my grandparents' house, when I lived with them, there were a lot of birds' nests in the backyard, and feral cats would hunt the baby birds that fell from the nest. One day I caught my cat playing with one of the birds and we saved the bird but it only lasted about a week before it died.
It was a lot younger, though, it was just fuzzy with no real adult feathers growing in yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,691 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
vet was unfortunately not an option, i don't even have the money to take my own animals to the vet right now.

anyway hubby and i went out to see if we could find a nest and lo and behold one of the dogs lays down and starts licking something that looks suspiciously like another bird. sure enough it was and this one was clearly injured, with blood on the wings. i don't think it was the dog though he just wandered over to it and started licking it and when i first found the other one in the garden the dog was nowhere near it (he actually had buggered off to the neighbour's yard to play with their dogs haha)

anyways i called the humane society which is of course closed for the evening, but they have an emergency line which is a glorified answering service (actually the woman said "i just work at an answering service, i don't know about these things") but from there i got a number for a rehab in the area. called that and got a woman who said she's temporarily closed but gave me another number to try. and finally got someone willing to help. she happened to be driving closeby otherwise we would have had to wait til tomorrow cause she's about an hour away or more. so she turned around and came straight here. she said the birds are actually mourning doves and that it looked like something got into the nest. she suggested cat but cats don't dare come near our yard with all the dogs around lol, i actually suspect crows. she took them and said she'll assess them and if she can she will rehabilitate and release them and if not they will be humanely euthanized. which is better than starving to death or getting eaten by a dog or other critter.
so i feel better.
once she said what they were hubby was like "ohhh is saw a dove near the driveway" my guess is they actually try to draw pray away from the babies and that's why they weren't nearby when we found the little ones. once the lady left we looked out near the garden and saw 2 adult mourning doves in a low branch near where we found them. they were waiting for us to go back inside so they could get back to the babies i guess. i feel bad that they'll be looking for them frantically but the injured one would not have survived without care and the other was so weak and so skinny, i think its chances were slim too even with the parents caring for it. so i think we did the right thing but i still feel bad for the parents

but now i know what a baby mourning dove looks like lol and now i know there is a rehab in the area, yay. i'm keeping the lady's phone number for future reference, though i didn't catch her name =/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Humanely euthanized? I don't think that's a good answer... I really hope they can be rehabilitated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Aww that's so sad...Poor baby birds. I'm frightened of them so I don't know what I would have done, but you've done awesome.

I'm with vegkid on the humanely euthanized thing, but if it's what's going to be best for the little birds then it's better than them starving to death or dying painfully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by tabbyx View Post

Aww that's so sad...Poor baby birds. I'm frightened of them so I don't know what I would have done, but you've done awesome.

I'm with vegkid on the humanely euthanized thing, but if it's what's going to be best for the little birds then it's better than them starving to death or dying painfully.
I still fail to see why a professional wildlife rehabilitation center wouldn't have the option of keeping the birds and raising them instead of euthanizing them. Heck, there are people everyday who take in baby birds and raise them to adulthood on little more than internet research. I can understand it for the injured one, but the healthy one? Why would they need to kill it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
It it doesn't eat or doesn't start to thrive then it may be the only option. Sometimes it happens with young birds. The shock alone can kill them. It wouldn't happen just because she has too many or anything like that, just if they are definitely not going to make it. Obviously people who are in this business will know when a young bird or other creature is showing signs that they are not going to make it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by tabbyx View Post

It it doesn't eat or doesn't start to thrive then it may be the only option. Sometimes it happens with young birds. The shock alone can kill them. It wouldn't happen just because she has too many or anything like that, just if they are definitely not going to make it. Obviously people who are in this business will know when a young bird or other creature is showing signs that they are not going to make it.
That's true. Didn't think about the fact that it could refuse food or care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
I think contacting a wildlife rehabilitation organization is the best thing you could do in that situation. Sometimes there are also veterinary clinics associated with the wildlife rehabilitation organizations, and you'll be able to bring animals in an emergency type setting. Other times animals can be dropped off at the wildlife rehabilitation centers or someone from the organization will drive to pick them up. If animals are euthanized, it's normally in critical cases where the animal would have ended up starving to death, or where the animal is too injured to survive. In that instance, I still think it's better that the animal is brought to rehabilitation centers where the people are more qualified to assess their condition.

If the birds have a chance of survival, there are very specific requirements to hand feeding baby birds, and it's very demanding in terms of how often they should be fed and how accurate the proportions must be. Someone who doesn't know how to properly care for them would probably end up not feeding them enough (so the animal would die from starvation) or feeding them too much. I might have a little experience with hand feeding birds, but I still wouldn't try to care for a wild animal if there are wildlife rehabilitation centers or concerned veterinarians around. It's not as simple as looking a few things up on the net, and some people, despite having good intentions, might end up prolonging the suffering of that animal by attempting to care for them on their own (rather than bringing the animal to a wildlife center). I think it's in the best interest of the animal that they receive proper care from qualified individuals whenever that option is available.

It might be a good idea to keep the phone numbers of local wildlife rehabilitation organizations in your phone's contact list as well. Sometimes the organization has a website too, and they might also have information on how to transport injured animals and what to do in emergency type settings. I keep a few numbers with me for that reason, just in case.

This is a search for local wildlife rehabilitation centers (U.S. and international) if anyone is interested: http://wildliferehabinfo.org/ContactList_MnPg.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyFaile View Post

once she said what they were hubby was like "ohhh is saw a dove near the driveway" my guess is they actually try to draw pray away from the babies and that's why they weren't nearby when we found the little ones. once the lady left we looked out near the garden and saw 2 adult mourning doves in a low branch near where we found them. they were waiting for us to go back inside so they could get back to the babies i guess. i feel bad that they'll be looking for them frantically but the injured one would not have survived without care and the other was so weak and so skinny, i think its chances were slim too even with the parents caring for it. so i think we did the right thing but i still feel bad for the parents
I just noticed this... have you contacted the woman to let her know that the parents are still there? Oftentimes fledglings leave their nests and their parents will continue to feed them from the ground. In that case, it's really best not to interfere. If one of the birds was injured and needed medical attention, then I agree that they should be kept at the wildlife center. But if the other bird is healthy, you could contact the woman and let her know about the parents. Also, domesticated dogs can easily kill fledglings, so it's good that you've taken that into consideration. If you see any more fledglings, I would try to supervise the dogs while they're outdoors.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top