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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

At first, when I stopped eating meat. I wasn't sure about what to eat. Now I feel like I have many more options than before. I have more variety in my diet and I am discovering new foods I like all the time. I ate a lote of vegetables before, but it was pretty expensive to buy both a lot of "good" meat and vegetables. The things that cost the most now are the occasional soy sausages.

I have a few questions:

Is it possible to maintain a vegetarian diet without eating meat substitutes like quorn, tofu and the like? Which one/ones of the existing meat substitutes are most and least processed?

At first I was pretty much always hungry, and I have realised I need to eat more often and with more variety than before. Some things make me really full fast though. What foods do you find to be really filling?

I wanted to have an English breakfast today, so I made scrambled eggs, with baked beans (from earlier this week), an avocado and some rye bread. I managed to eat a slice of bread, the avocado and a few bites of baked beans and eggs. Normally I need to eat more to get full. Did you notice that here was a period of adjustment when you started a vegetarian diet?
Maybe that you needed to eat more at first but as you found the foods that worked for you, you found som sort of balance?

I guess I sound like a broken record, but I don't have many vegetarian friends, and I just feel like sharing the fact that I feel amazingly good not eating meat. I feel lighter and just happy with my choice
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Hello and Welcome !

I'm also new to vegetarian eating even though I have always cooked and baked quite a lot using wholemsome and healthy ingredients. It is quite different when you give up animal protein and you always seem to be in a rut when trying to work out a day's menu.

I often have tofu, beans, lentils. I sometimes make seitan but find it very time consuming. I also do have eggs and this is one of the main reasons why I do not follow a vegan diet. It is a good idea to add tofu and quorn if not I think that in the long run you'll get fed up of eating beans and lentils.

I also find that you do need the extra carbs that are not processed and fat. I also add more fat to my diet by eating avocadoes, nuts and soya cream.

I have just bought a book on how to make veggie burgers and hope that this will enable me to add different protein substitutes for my main meals. I do find that the difficulty is coming up with a wholesome, healthy dinner. Breakfast, snacks and lunch are far easier to make.

Good luck !
 

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Yeah, your body gets so used to eating so much processed foods in order to get the nutrients it needs that your belly needs time to contract once you start eating healthy things that fills you with what you need faster. I eat about half of what my friends do, which is because my diet is filled with fruits, veggies, and rice, beans, etc. And no, if you are eating the protein and fat you require from more natural sources then you don't need tofu and quorn. Nuts, beans, mmmmm split peas! So many options!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thistle View Post

Hello.

At first, when I stopped eating meat. I wasn't sure about what to eat. Now I feel like I have many more options than before. I have more variety in my diet and I am discovering new foods I like all the time. I ate a lote of vegetables before, but it was pretty expensive to buy both a lot of "good" meat and vegetables. The things that cost the most now are the occasional soy sausages.

I have a few questions:

Is it possible to maintain a vegetarian diet without eating meat substitutes like quorn, tofu and the like? Which one/ones of the existing meat substitutes are most and least processed?

At first I was pretty much always hungry, and I have realised I need to eat more often and with more variety than before. Some things make me really full fast though. What foods do you find to be really filling?

I wanted to have an English breakfast today, so I made scrambled eggs, with baked beans (from earlier this week), an avocado and some rye bread. I managed to eat a slice of bread, the avocado and a few bites of baked beans and eggs. Normally I need to eat more to get full. Did you notice that here was a period of adjustment when you started a vegetarian diet?
Maybe that you needed to eat more at first but as you found the foods that worked for you, you found som sort of balance?

I guess I sound like a broken record, but I don't have many vegetarian friends, and I just feel like sharing the fact that I feel amazingly good not eating meat. I feel lighter and just happy with my choice
.
Hi and welcome! That English breakfast sounds delicious


There is definitely an adjustment period at first, and I've found eating more often and bigger portions is a nice bonus to cutting out meat. And it's very possible to be vegetarian without any tofu or meat substitutes if you don't like them or want to avoid them for health reasons. I suggest looking at vegetarian recipes and getting ideas for things you like, this is a fantastic site to start: http://vegweb.com/

And another good one: http://allrecipes.com/recipes/everyd...ng/vegetarian/

Also, one thing that really helped me when I first started was seeing what other vegetarians actually eat every day! Here are three great threads with literally thousands of ideas for breakfast, lunch and dinner:

http://www.veggieboards.com/newvb/sh...Breakfast!-%28
http://www.veggieboards.com/newvb/sh...or-lunch-today
http://www.veggieboards.com/newvb/sh...t-s-for-dinner

Hope that helps, enjoy!
 

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Personally, i would suggest that you start the day with a raw food breakfast, it's less taxing on your digestive system and can make you feel more satisfied, quicker.

Did you eat full English breakfasts before you became vegetarian? Those things are a heart attack waiting to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your answers and all the links!I feel like I'm getting a hang of this now. I've been reading up on nutrition and I seem to get a lot of info on how people who used to be vegetarians feel like they have done a lot of damage to their bodies. Is malnutrition really that common among vegetarians or does this just apply to people that eat pasta with tomato sauce for every meal
? Will I not get all the vitamines I need if I don't eat meat substitutes?

Quote:
Personally, i would suggest that you start the day with a raw food breakfast, it's less taxing on your digestive system and can make you feel more satisfied, quicker.

Did you eat full English breakfasts before you became vegetarian? Those things are a heart attack waiting to happen.
I normally eat sandwiches or so for breakfast, and eggs very often. Sometimes I eat porridge of some sort. I like scramblede eggs, and I guess I used to eat an English breakfast once a month or so before. Since I'm not English it mostly consisted of bacon and eggs and some vegetables with that, sometimes baked beans. This is the first time I have made baked beans from scratch though. I'll have to check out som raw food recepies, but I like to eat some sort of warm food for breakfast to last a while.
 

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Malnutrition isn't common because of the vegetarian diet, malnutrition is common because of a person not eating a proper vegetarian diet. Many people who have told me that being veg wasn't good on their health either won't tell me what their eating habits were like OR when they tell me I realize their habits weren't healthy...many times they weren't eating enough calories or relied heavily on faux meat products. In your original post you asked if a person can eat this way without faux meats or things like tofu: yes! I have never been big on faux meats (I eat them maybe once every couple of months) and soy like tofu/tempeh does a number on my stomach. I'm a beans and seitan kind of girl. Just don't do seitan if you are gluten free
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by christinahudler View Post

Malnutrition isn't common because of the vegetarian diet, malnutrition is common because of a person not eating a proper vegetarian diet. Many people who have told me that being veg wasn't good on their health either won't tell me what their eating habits were like OR when they tell me I realize their habits weren't healthy...many times they weren't eating enough calories or relied heavily on faux meat products. In your original post you asked if a person can eat this way without faux meats or things like tofu: yes! I have never been big on faux meats (I eat them maybe once every couple of months) and soy like tofu/tempeh does a number on my stomach. I'm a beans and seitan kind of girl. Just don't do seitan if you are gluten free
I tried seitan yesterday actually. I used to love Italian tuna pasta with tomatoes, garlic and baby spinach. I made the same thing with Mock Abalone instead of tuna and It came out great. It tasted pretty much the same as with tuna and I always thought it was the tuna that made the dish so good. I'm happy I was wrong. I still have to find a vegetarian parmesan, I don't know if I can find that in Sweden. I was thinking I could use nutritional yeast instead.
I hate quorn and I'm not that big on tofu, I like soy sausages but I feel like I have to eat a lot of those to get full. I still have to try tempeh and another meat substitute I heard of, I don't remember what it's called though.
 

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Hey Thistle!!

Your questions are definitely warranted. When I first became a vegetarian it was somewhat confusing how I was going to get all of my vital nutrients. Turns out, it's super easy. There are so many whole grains that provide plenty of B12 and nutrients--such as quinoa, millet, brown rice, etc. These grains can be incorporated into SO many delicious meals. For instance..you can stuff peppers quinoa, cheese, and veggies. You could even make a rice & broccoli bake with cheese, milk, eggs, etc. These meals provide you with a complete & balanced diet--you have your protein, fat, vitamins, minerals, calcium, and all that good stuff!

I have a blog with over 200+ recipes on it, I try to make them healthy and delicious. If you want, you should check it out!

Good luck!!


Antonia
 
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