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So, I've heard that when consuming flaxseed, one shouldn't heat it up or else it converts to bad fats. But when I look at vegan dessert recipes, they tell me that flaxseed (ground) is excellent for replacing eggs, but wouldn't the heat from the oven make it turn bad?
 

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The Omega 3 fatty acids in flaxseed and flaxseed oil are highly susceptible to oxidation/rancidity so you really shouldn't cook with them. In addition to losing the healthful properties, the free radicals that are produced are something you want to avoid. I use flaxseed only for mixing in with cold foods like hummus or smoothies or sprinkling on salads, and I also buy them whole and grind them as needed.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>penny79</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2824621"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
It's perfectly safe to eat. You just don't get the benefit of the nutrition of the raw seeds.</div>
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This.
 

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I thought ground flaxseed could be added to stuff like rice, which doesn't get hotter than boiling- you just aren't supposed to fry with flaxseed oil. Am I mistaken?... because I think the unground flax seeds which make it through by blender are easier to chew after they've boiled a bit.
 

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I never knew that they were supposed to be dangerous to heat up. Aren't most of the flax seeds available at the store already heated, to prevent them from going bad?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Digger</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2824665"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
The Omega 3 fatty acids in flaxseed and flaxseed oil are highly susceptible to oxidation/rancidity so you really shouldn't cook with them. In addition to losing the healthful properties, the free radicals that are produced are something you want to avoid. I use flaxseed only for mixing in with cold foods like hummus or smoothies or sprinkling on salads, and I also buy them whole and grind them as needed.</div>
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I wasn't aware of this! Thanks for the info!
 

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This is why I don't understand why fish is touted as a good source of Omega 3 fatty acids. If the fatty acid bonds are that easy to break with even low heat, people who eat cooked fish aren't getting any, and people who eat raw fish are getting more than they bargain for, in terms of unwanted passengers.<br><br>
I'm not sure baking with flaxseed is dangerous though. You just won't get any Omega 3. If that fatty acids do turn from cis to trans, I don't think there's enough of them in a typical quantity of flaxseed used in a recipe to cause great harm.
 

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My understanding was that it's okay to bake with ground flaxseed, only as others say, you will lose some of the omega-3s, and that what you want to avoid is cooking with flaxseed oil. Flaxseed oil should be consumed raw; whereas with ground flaxseed it's okay to consume it cooked, but to ensure you get your omega-3s you're better off also making sure you consume them raw as well.<br><br>
I don't use flaxseed oil, and occasionally I bake breads and muffins and things with ground flaxseed. I also sprinkle flaxseed on random things like soy yogourt, soups and stews... it will go with pretty much anything, actually. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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